Question First PC Build advice please

Mar 30, 2022
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Hello everyone this is my first post and fist build so please forgive me for any obvious mistakes.


I’m looking at building my own pc this year. After doing some research and watching some videos I came up with this PC build, would these parts would be comparable and do you think this would be a solid PC?.

Corsair 5000D Airflow White Mid Tower Tempered Glass PC Gaming Case

MSI MPG EDGE MAX WIFI X570S AM4 PCIe 4.0 ATX Motherboard

AMD Ryzen 7 5800X 8 Core AM4

Corsair Vengeance LPX Black 32GB 3600MHz AMD Ryzen Tuned DDR4 Memory Kit

MSI NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Ti 8GB VENTUS 3X OC Ampere Graphics Card

Corsair MP600 CORE 1TB M.2 PCIe Gen 4 NVMe Performance SSD/Solid State Drive

Corsair 360mm H150i ELITE CAPELLIX WHITE RGB Intel/AMD CPU Liquid Cooler, (mounted on the top of the case).

2X Corsair White LL120 RGB 120mm Dual Light Loop 3 Fan + Lighting Node PRO Pack, (6 fans in total for intake on front and side of case).

Corsair White LL120 RGB 120mm Dual Light Loop 1 Fan Expansion Pack, (1 single fan for the back exhaust).

Also, after adding this all up it seems to be an expensive build haha, so I was wondering could I buy each part over the next 4-10 months and build the PC over time ?
 
What psu do you plan to use with the build? It is very common to buy pc parts as you go along with a build. Not everyone has the money to drop all at once for a new pc build. You may want to think about going 2 tb for your ssd. With games and programs these days it is very easy to fill a 1tb ssd.
Also, you may want to wait and buy your gpu last since Nvidia is going to start releasing new models of gpu's in September. The rest looks like a nice build.
 
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Mar 30, 2022
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Yeah, the psu is a bit of a difficult one for me as it’s my fist build but I’ve used a couple of psu calculators and I believe it would need a 850W so I was going to buy an ASU’s ROG Strix white edition to match the case haha. Yeah I was thinking of buying 2 of the 1TB SSD as I believe the motherboard does support two SSDs, either that or just buy 1 2TB SSD haha.

I’ve heard GPU prices have been really bad recently so I was going to wait for a few months to buy it just to see if it comes down which I suspect it will
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
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Lafong

Respectable
If you buy the parts over time and put them on a shelf for that time, you are taking a risk that some of them are dead or faulty. You would have no way of knowing while they are on the shelf.

Dead or faulty is very very unlikely for a CPU.

Less unlikely for power supplies and RAM or drives.

Much less unlikely for motherboards.

Take your chances or not.
 
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geofelt

Titan
What is your budget, and where might you shop?
It would seem that your objective is gaming.
In that case, your primary concern would be the graphics card and not the cpu.
If you are interested in multithreaded batch production, that is a different issue.
If you can handle the budget for a 3070ti, that is very good.
Prices are coming down, so you might wait on that.

I know you are anxious to buy and get started, but resist that urge.
Prices may change, and you do not want to pass any return window for defective parts.
Buy when you can assemble and test parts.
Today, the superior single thread performance of Intel 12th generation makes it a better gamer than the amd offerings.
You likely do not need the 16 threads of the 5800x.
Games rarely can effectively use more than 4-6 threads.
The i5-12400 with 12 threads would be a bit stronger as a gamer.
You would not need to spend big bucks on a 360 aio.
And, with integrated graphics, you could defer on the graphics card to get you started.
 
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This is all really helpful advice, I completely neglected Intel CPU’s but the BB60 Tomahawk seems to match really well with the intel core i7 12700F.

As I’m based in the UK I’d be looking at saving around 2-2,500 UK pounds (around $3,200).

The reason for waiting is mainly because I want to build a really good PC and I’d rather not spend £1,000 on a cheap set up and then spend more money improving it over time.

I think I may just try and save the money as I agree it would be heart breaking collecting the components overtime to realise after the build there is an issue with something.

I feel happy with most other parts including the fan set up so what I’ll do is concentrate on the graphics card, see maybe if I could get a better one like a 3080 TI
 
Last edited:
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Why_Me

Glorious
This is all really helpful advice, I completely neglected Intel CPU’s but the BB60 Tomahawk seems to match really well with the intel core i7 12700F.

As I’m based in the UK I’d be looking at saving around 2-2,500 UK pounds (around $3,200).

The reason for waiting is mainly because I want to build a really good PC and I’d rather not spend £1,000 on a cheap set up and then spend more money improving it over time.

I think I may just try and save the money as I agree it would be heart breaking collecting the components overtime to realise after the build there is an issue with something.

I feel happy with most other parts including the fan set up so what I’ll do is concentrate on the graphics card, see maybe if I could get a better one like a 3080 TI
This gives you a rough idea of what you're looking at cost wise.

https://www.scan.co.uk/products/msi-mag-b660-tomahawk-wifi-ddr4-intel-b660-s-1700-ddr4-sata3-pcie-40-3xm2-25gbe-wifi-6-bt52-usb-32-a
MSI MAG B660 TOMAHAWK WIFI DDR4 £187.99

https://www.cclonline.com/product/368422/BX8071512700F/CPU-Processors/Intel-Core-i7-12700F-Desktop-Processor-2-1GHz-Base-4-9GHz-Turbo-12-Cores-8P-4E-20-Threads-Socket-LGA1700-65W-TDP-25MB-Cache-No-Graphics-Intel-Laminar-RH1-Cooler/CPU0753/
Intel Core i7 12700F £299.77

https://www.technextday.co.uk/product/deepcool-ak620-universal-socket-120mm-pwm-1850rpm-black-fan-cpu-cooler
DeepCool AK620 Fan CPU Cooler £50.97

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/deepcool-ak620-review
 
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Yeah I’ve swapped to that motherboard and CPU I think that would definitely work better and it seems to be compatible with all the other parts.

To be honest I much prefer the look of an AIO with 3 fans mounted in the top of the case, I know you shouldn’t really choose aesthetics over function haha but I think 6 intakes on the front and side, the AIO mounted on the top with 3 fans and one fan on the back of the case would hopefully create positive airflow and cool everything down really well.
 
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geofelt

Titan
Some thoughts:

There is no arguing about looks.
It is in the eye of the beholder.
But, like women's skirt lengths, fashion will change and what looks good now may change.
Remember, pretty is as pretty does.

On the practical side, unless one is going to overclock a processor, or needs many threads for processing, overclocking and the need for ultra cooling is no longer necessary.
For the most part, a 280 aio cooler is no more efficient as a cooler than a top tier air cooler.
Air is cheaper, more reliable, easier to install, and will never leak.

In the fall, intel should launch the 13th gen processors.
They will not be much different than 12th gen.
If buying new, you can expect better price/performance.
(Otherwise, why would Intel even bother?)
If you look at current lga1700 motherboards, you will get a good idea of what is coming.
On a high end build, do not go cheap and buy a F suffix processor.
It is most useful for testing and problem resolution.

It used to be that a top power supply was a safe early purchase.
Perhaps not so much today with pcie power changes.
If you are in the market for a new psu, here are some thoughts:

1. Buy the capacity you need and then some.
Here is a link to what you need; it depends on the graphics configuration:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

I have no problem overprovisioning a PSU a bit. Say 20%.
It will allow for a stronger future graphics card upgrade.
It will run cooler, quieter, and more efficiently in the middle third of it's range.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.

2. Buy only a quality psu. Try to buy a tier 1 or 2 unit from a list such as this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html
Seasonic is generally very good.
Look for a unit with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
A good psu is a long term investment.

A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
If it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive. Do not buy one.

3. It is unlikely that the price premium paid for gold rating will ever be returned to you in electricity cost savings.
There IS value in higher efficiency in that the cooling fan will need to run less and the unit will generally be quieter

4. Modular costs more. Consider that you are likely to be using most of the power leads regardless. There will normally be a decent place to store unused leads away and out if sight or the cooling airstream. Also, if you have a length restriction, the leads that plug into a modular psu will not bend as much as a fixed attachment consequently taking more room, not less.


I have noticed that in the fall, Seasonic has very good units on sale.


When building a top pc, do not forget about the monitor.
Bust your budget for a good one.
It will last for several generations of pc.
To my mind, larger/higher resolution units are more immersive to the gamer.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a long #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
A small led flashlight is also useful.

I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch-_-12-119-009-_-Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

  1. Install windows.
  2. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
  4. Opinions vary on updating the bios. On a new build, I will update to currency right away. My thought is that I have no big loss if
I encounter a problem. Use the usb option, not the windows option.
 
Mar 30, 2022
14
3
15
0
Some thoughts:

There is no arguing about looks.
It is in the eye of the beholder.
But, like women's skirt lengths, fashion will change and what looks good now may change.
Remember, pretty is as pretty does.

On the practical side, unless one is going to overclock a processor, or needs many threads for processing, overclocking and the need for ultra cooling is no longer necessary.
For the most part, a 280 aio cooler is no more efficient as a cooler than a top tier air cooler.
Air is cheaper, more reliable, easier to install, and will never leak.

In the fall, intel should launch the 13th gen processors.
They will not be much different than 12th gen.
If buying new, you can expect better price/performance.
(Otherwise, why would Intel even bother?)
If you look at current lga1700 motherboards, you will get a good idea of what is coming.
On a high end build, do not go cheap and buy a F suffix processor.
It is most useful for testing and problem resolution.

It used to be that a top power supply was a safe early purchase.
Perhaps not so much today with pcie power changes.
If you are in the market for a new psu, here are some thoughts:

1. Buy the capacity you need and then some.
Here is a link to what you need; it depends on the graphics configuration:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

I have no problem overprovisioning a PSU a bit. Say 20%.
It will allow for a stronger future graphics card upgrade.
It will run cooler, quieter, and more efficiently in the middle third of it's range.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.

2. Buy only a quality psu. Try to buy a tier 1 or 2 unit from a list such as this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html
Seasonic is generally very good.
Look for a unit with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
A good psu is a long term investment.

A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
If it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive. Do not buy one.

3. It is unlikely that the price premium paid for gold rating will ever be returned to you in electricity cost savings.
There IS value in higher efficiency in that the cooling fan will need to run less and the unit will generally be quieter

4. Modular costs more. Consider that you are likely to be using most of the power leads regardless. There will normally be a decent place to store unused leads away and out if sight or the cooling airstream. Also, if you have a length restriction, the leads that plug into a modular psu will not bend as much as a fixed attachment consequently taking more room, not less.


I have noticed that in the fall, Seasonic has very good units on sale.


When building a top pc, do not forget about the monitor.
Bust your budget for a good one.
It will last for several generations of pc.
To my mind, larger/higher resolution units are more immersive to the gamer.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a long #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
A small led flashlight is also useful.

I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

  1. Install windows.
  2. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
  4. Opinions vary on updating the bios. On a new build, I will update to currency right away. My thought is that I have no big loss if
I encounter a problem. Use the usb option, not the windows option.

I have to say I was sceptical of posting on a forum as I have never done such a thing ever but doing this today has really put my mind at ease. This will really come in handy when setting the PC up for the first time, the only problem I have is I can’t load windows on a USB as I don’t currently have a device to do so :(, I only suppose you could buy a USB with windows pre installed maybe

I definitely agree with the PSU, I’m going for a corsair RM750 white fully modular, the price for this isn’t too bad in the UK as it goes so I think this is best.

Do you think then it would be best having three fans on the front and a dual fan 240 AIO mounted on the top of the case?, I’m looking at buying the Corsair 5000D as it seems perfect for a first build.
 

geofelt

Titan
When you buy windows, you get the code on a usb stick.
That is what you boot from to load windows to the C drive.
If you want, you can use your own usb stick and load the code on that directly from microsoft.
You can run free for 30 days.
After that time a watermark will show up on your display(not too distracting).
You will also get nagged to activate.
Later, you will need to pay for the activation code.
 

geofelt

Titan
I like the Corsair 5000D as a case.
It has excellent airflow and is suitable for a good air cooler.
Do you know that an aio cooler will not last forever?
Air will enter the system through the tubes and it will need to be replaced.
Think 6 years.
Mounting an aio is a catch 22 thing.
If you mount in front, taking in cool air, the cpu is cooled best, bht the heated air is what the graphics card and motherboard vrm's use for cooling.
OTOH, if you mount on top, the radiator will use warmed motherboard and gpu air as a source and not cool as efficiently.
Noctua maintains a database of cpu suitability for their coolers.
Here is the chart for the 12700K as an example:
https://ncc.noctua.at/cpus/model/Intel-Core-i7-12700K-1579
The top coolers like the NH-D15s will cost less than $100.
 

Lafong

Respectable
Oh I see, so when you buy windows they provide you with the usb to load into the PC
That may be possible from some sources, but you can also just buy the Product Key.....a long combination of numerals and alphabet characters typically sent to you by email.

You would then go to Microsoft web site and use their "Media Creation Tool" to make the Windows installer using YOUR OWN usb flash drive. Any will do if at least 8 gb in size.

Install and then use the Product Key you bought to activate.
 

geofelt

Titan
Oh I see, so when you buy windows they provide you with the usb to load into the PC
Exactly. What you are paying for in windows is the license activation key.
The code, itself is free.
You can buy the code loaded on a usb for perhaps$20 more than just the activation code delivered via email.
For example:
https://www.newegg.com/microsoft-windows-10-home-full-version-32-64-bit/p/N82E16832588506

There is a cheaper oem option which is only valid on the original motherboard.

I might add, do not be seduced by an extra low price for windows.
There may be issues such as activation malware and...
If the price is more than 10% discounted look for a legitimate seller.
 
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Mar 30, 2022
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That’s makes more sense, I believed you would buy a usb with windows 11 home then install, but I see you buy the windows 10 home usb then use your own bought product key to install.

do you think I would get enough air flow and positive airflow with 2 exhaust fans on the top and three fans on the front for intake ?
 

geofelt

Titan
The case comes with one 120 mounted in the rear; keep that.
It will direct front intake airflow over your cooler, motherboard, and graphics card.
Leave the top open.
Top exit fans would tend to divert air out the top before it can do much cooling.
For the front, a 120mm comes mounted.
You could add two more.
What air comes in the front will exit the case somewhere, taking component heat with it.
I like 140mm fans; they move more air quietly at lower rpm.
Personally, I would buy two 140mm fans and not use the second 120mm fan that came with the case.

Think about it...
One 140mm front intake fan would take care of feeding this noctua NH-D15s with white covers:
https://www.newegg.com/p/13C-0005-00255
I dont know that I would pay extra for white, but that is just me.
The second 140mm fan is about the equivalent same as three 92mm fans commonly used on a graphics card.
 
Reactions: MaRk196
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The only other thing I’m nervous of is the wiring and where things go haha, but like you said download the manual for the motherboard and read It over, I think this will help as well
 
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