Build Advice First time building my own PC, can anyone check my parts?

Aug 24, 2019
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I'm building a PC and I'm not 1000% sure about compatibility between parts, power supply needed, better replacements for my picks, etc.

PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YPFDCb

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($145.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: AMD Wraith Max 55.78 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.88 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M Steel Legend Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: OLOy WarHawk RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($132.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11 GB GAMING X Video Card ($1290.00 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ NZXT)
Power Supply: Antec EarthWatts Green 500 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply
Total: $1831.72
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-11 23:44 EDT-0400

I am buying used 1080ti and power supply, the rest is all new. I also am using the stock cooling for everything, as the CPU comes with a cooler the 1080ti has a cooler built-in.

Any advice about part incompatibility, replacing parts, or building the PC in general is greatly appreciated!
 
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Aug 24, 2019
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  1. No SSD?
  2. That PSU is junk, get a better one, never cheap out on psu!
What is your major usage?
budget and country?
I have a 1tb hard drive currently, I don't want to buy another one to replace a perfectly good one. Also, the PSU has 650 watts, is it just low quality?

My budget is around $100-120 max for a psu, unless they are extremely low quality.
Major usage as in the point of the computer? I game a lot, but it'll probably be mining some crypto when idle.

Also, I live in Canada.
 
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16 gb is more than enough for gaming.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($103.98 @ Vuugo)
Memory: OLOy WarHawk RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($90.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING AMP Video Card ($899.00 @ Canada Computers)
Case: Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Total: $1463.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 01:05 EDT-0400
 
Reactions: magnus2307

FALC0N

Splendid
Personally, I wouldn't drop $2000 on your first build. If you aren't sure about something as simple as compatibility, then you might consider doing something much smaller to start with. My first build was $150 of parts (case, psu, board, CPU, and RAM) combined with pieces cannibalized off my prebuilt systems. My second build, which was the one I actually used, was MUCH better due to the additional experience with the trial run.
 
Reactions: magnus2307
Aug 24, 2019
21
1
15
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16 gb is more than enough for gaming.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($174.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty B450 GAMING K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($103.98 @ Vuugo)
Memory: OLOy WarHawk RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($90.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING AMP Video Card ($899.00 @ Canada Computers)
Case: Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon Canada)
Total: $1463.94
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 01:05 EDT-0400
That was a mistake, I was looking for 16gb, but thanks, ill use the one you chose out!
 
Aug 24, 2019
21
1
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Personally, I wouldn't drop $2000 on your first build. If you aren't sure about something as simple as compatibility, then you might consider doing something much smaller to start with. My first build was $150 of parts (case, psu, board, CPU, and RAM) combined with pieces cannibalized off my prebuilt systems. My second build, which was the one I actually used, was MUCH better due to the additional experience with the trial run.
I have disassembled two computers I have near me already, but I wouldn't buy a bad pc just to learn then pay for a brand new one right after. I've also been told it's fairly simple to build a PC so I hope that's the case too.
 
Your original post said 500w, later you said it is 650w.
Which??
GTX1080ti will be happier with 600w.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
That psu is only middling quality.

I will never again build without a ssd for the "C" drive. It makes everything you do much quicker.
240gb is minimum, it will hold the os and a handful of games.

If you can go 500gb you may never need a hard drive.
With ssd prices down, even 1tb is reasonable.

Plan on using the 1tb drive for backup and storage.
 
Reactions: SgtScream
Aug 24, 2019
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Your original post said 500w, later you said it is 650w.
Which??
GTX1080ti will be happier with 600w.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
That psu is only middling quality.

I will never again build without a ssd for the "C" drive. It makes everything you do much quicker.
240gb is minimum, it will hold the os and a handful of games.

If you can go 500gb you may never need a hard drive.
With ssd prices down, even 1tb is reasonable.

Plan on using the 1tb drive for backup and storage.
I'll see about the SSD, if it makes that big a difference I might buy one for the C: drive. I also just chose the wrong power supply, I'm getting a 650 watt power supply now.

Thanks for the tip!
 

FALC0N

Splendid
I have disassembled two computers I have near me already, but I wouldn't buy a bad pc just to learn then pay for a brand new one right after. I've also been told it's fairly simple to build a PC so I hope that's the case too.
It's always simple once you have done it before or when everything goes right, but it seems to me that 90% of build issues come from first time builders. Do you REALLY want to make all your rookie mistakes on 2k worth of hardware? There is no right or wrong answer to that question. Just go into it with both eyes open.

All that said, completely disassembling and reassembling an older system is the next best thing. That Is an inexpensive way to gather some hands on experience.
 
This might help:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 
Aug 24, 2019
21
1
15
0
This might help:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
This is very detailed, I’ll follow it when building my pc. Thanks!
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
One thing I would suggest is to drop the extra Wraith cooler since it's already included with your CPU. You're essentially buying the same part twice. I also have never heard of that RAM brand. Stick with the known brands - G.Skill, Corsair, ADATA, Hyper X, and so on.
 
Aug 24, 2019
21
1
15
0
One thing I would suggest is to drop the extra Wraith cooler since it's already included with your CPU. You're essentially buying the same part twice. I also have never heard of that RAM brand. Stick with the known brands - G.Skill, Corsair, ADATA, Hyper X, and so on.
I am using the stock cooler, I thought it was the one I chose. Also I'll stick with those brands, thanks man.
 

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