Folder name too long to copy/transfer windows 10

wir

Apr 17, 2018
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Hi
I am getting from some folders in windows a message that says the folder name is too long to transfer. How can I overcome that?

Thanks for your time and help
Paula
 

stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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If you’re cloning the drive to make a backup copy, then cool. However, if you’re trying to reuse the existing Windows directory for a new MB, don’t bother wasting your time.

First of all, Windows will most assuredly fail with a BSOD upon boot. And even if it does boot, the HW change alone will force a Windows product reactivation. Secondly, per Microsoft’s licensing, OEM copies of Windows are non-transferable to a new computer per the EULA.

So if you’re looking to use an OEM copy of Windows, you’ll need to purchase another license anyway at which point you might as well install a copy fresh.
 

stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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The entire path can't be more than 260 characters in length. After accounting for the system, that's down to 247 characters if your folder/file structure in a single path.

You have three options:

1. Truncate the path by renaming files and folders.
2. Share a folder in the middle of the path, then address it directly via a UNC path which will set it as the root starting point.
3. Use the ROBOCOPY command.
 

wir

Apr 17, 2018
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Hi.
The trouble is these are windows folders and if I change the name I dont know if they will work, plus there are hundreds of them and I am not even sure where they are, so I would have to stop all the other copying and do it all over again. it has already taken 8 hours and there is not way to tell what has been copied and what hasnt!

ms:displayname=Suchergebnisse%20in%20"Windows"&crumb=location:G%3A%5CWindows\wow64_microsoft-windows-r..t-v2-core.resources_31bf3856ad364e35_10.0.16299.15_en-us_672fe277115598ec

as an example
Paula
 

Rumbletum

Distinguished
Feb 2, 2012
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I have only experienced this on a few folders, and sorting them out was time consuming, so I understand your reluctance where hundreds are involved. Suggest you research stdragon's suggestions. Just a thought, would creating an image of your disc achieve waht you are trying to do?
 

stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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What are you ultimately trying to accomplish?

-Are you just wanting to copy each and every file so nothing is missed?
-Clone a drive so that volume boots in Windows?
-Just copy your own user data?

If you're unsure, I'd recommend using the ROBOCOPY /MIR command. Just be aware that the destination drive will mirror what's on the source, so if you already have data within the path of your destination, it will get erased and overwritten with what's now on the source drive.

Example: ROBOCOPY "c:\Videos" "d:\Videos" /MIR

I don't recommend doing a robocopy to the root of the destination drive if you can at all avoid it as there are system files at the root you'd rather not overwrite; though not the end of the world if you do however.

Here's the Microsoft explanation below:

Simple Usage :: ROBOCOPY source destination /MIR

source :: Source Directory (drive:\path or \\server\share\path).
destination :: Destination Dir (drive:\path or \\server\share\path).


If you're wanting to robocopy over the network, the following is what I personally prefer.

NET USE \\server(or IP)\IPC$

ROBOCOPY "\\SourceServer\Share" "\\DestinationServer\Share" /MIR /FFT /Z /XA:H /W:0 /tee /LOG+:c:\robolog.txt

If the SMB share is open to everyone, or both servers are on the same domain, you probably wont need the NET USE to authenticate manually. As such, just execute the robocopy command.
 

wir

Apr 17, 2018
13
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stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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Yes, Acronis TrueImage 2018 works very well for cloning drives. It will even resize the partition for you. I use it to create a bootable ISO and clone drives all the time. That way, you don’t have to be booted in Windows to do it:)
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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From your other thread...you're trying to "copy" too much.

You need to just discover your personal data.
The entirety of the current Windows OS is of no use, because you're going to do a full reinstall.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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Starting a new thread halfway through your situation often (usually?) leads to incorrect answers.
THe people responding here don't know the backstory of why you're trying to do this.

The original thread:
http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-3687743/installing-mobo-cpu-ram.html

New motherboard, CPU, etc.
Leading to a full OS reinstall.
Which means you should copy your personal data off the existing drive.

NOT the entirety of the OS install.
Nor a clone, or robocopy, or whatever.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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ASRock Z68 Pro3 + Intel i3 2500
moving to...
ASUS PRIME B250-PLUS + Intel Kaby Lake i3 7100


It may boot up, it may fail completely.
A "clone" does not change that.
Prepare for if it fails.
 

stdragon

Commendable
Apr 5, 2018
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If you’re cloning the drive to make a backup copy, then cool. However, if you’re trying to reuse the existing Windows directory for a new MB, don’t bother wasting your time.

First of all, Windows will most assuredly fail with a BSOD upon boot. And even if it does boot, the HW change alone will force a Windows product reactivation. Secondly, per Microsoft’s licensing, OEM copies of Windows are non-transferable to a new computer per the EULA.

So if you’re looking to use an OEM copy of Windows, you’ll need to purchase another license anyway at which point you might as well install a copy fresh.
 

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