Info For "BAD_SYSTEM_CONFIG_INFO" errors -- A Solution

Mar 5, 2019
15
2
15
0
Recently, I suffered through the "BAD_SYSTEM_CONFIG_INFO" error that occurs when messing with the MSCONFIG processors
and something not being compatible when you change that (to 1 processor, or to 6; either way, I've read where some had the
same error going either way).

So, okay, apparently the only reason to even change the number of processors in the MSCONFIG (Boot...Advanced) area is to
make the computer boot faster and utilize all the processors/cores you have. And, memory, too--as there's a setting there for that
(0 meaning all of the memory being available). But more modern BIOSes and computers automatically take care of that, I guess.

Anyway, I got the error after changing the number of processors to 6 (as I have a six-core Ryzen 5) and set memory to 0 (to use
all of my 32GB of RAM). Rebooted, and it wouldn't go back into Windows 10. Tried EVERYTHING that I read online about it
(using another computer, of course, which I fortunately have). Did the Repair attempts, the roll-back of earlier Restore Points,
etc. Nothing worked. It would not boot, would just go back into the error screen (blue) and route you this way or that to try
and troubleshoot.

Well, I wound up biting the bullet and re-installing Windows 10. And only now did I stumble across the solution, so I thought
I'd pass it along. I did a search on here and saw that MANY people have had this problem over the last few years.

Here's the page (you may have to use Translate, for English):
https://nilcemar.blogspot.com/2012/04/corrigir-badsystemconfiginfo-no-windows.html

Here's the relevant, most important quote:
"
  • On the screen that appears on the command prompt, type bcdedit / deletevalue {default} numproc and give <enter>.
  • Enter now: bcdedit / deletevalue {default} truncatememory and give <enter>.
  • Close the command prompt.
  • Restart your computer and voila!
  • Life saved without formatting the windows !!
"

Just get to the Command Prompt any way you can, and type in what's in bold above.
It gets rid of the setting in MSCONFIG, if you put one there and your Windows messed up because of it.

Once I got Windows 10 back up, as I've been installing new programs and such, I've also been making
more backups, and even a DVD Repair Disc, just in case I ever have to catch back up after such an error.
I've left MSCONFIG alone now, even knowing it's bound to say only 1 processor, when I have 6. I never
had a problem with it before, when setting earlier Windows versions to something (like 2, for a dual-core
Athlon or something). Just sometimes a motherboard or something doesn't like it. And, I'm not too
worried about it, I have Windows booting in 10-to-15 seconds (and can probably tweak it faster
outside of MSCONFIG).

At any rate, wish I had known of this guy's solution the other day.
 

Phillip Corcoran

Titan
Moderator
"So, okay, apparently the only reason to even change the number of processors in the MSCONFIG (Boot...Advanced) area is to
make the computer boot faster and utilize all the processors/cores you have."


You seem to not understand that what MSCONFIG is intended to be used for -- it's a troubleshooting utility & should be left alone except when problems are encountered.
It is not a tweaking tool.

Windows uses all the CPU cores by default, so there's no need to mess with MSCONFIG to make Windows do that.
 
Mar 5, 2019
15
2
15
0
"So, okay, apparently the only reason to even change the number of processors in the MSCONFIG (Boot...Advanced) area is to
make the computer boot faster and utilize all the processors/cores you have."


You seem to not understand that what MSCONFIG is intended to be used for -- it's a troubleshooting utility & should be left alone except when problems are encountered.
It is not a tweaking tool.

Windows uses all the CPU cores by default, so there's no need to mess with MSCONFIG to make Windows do that.
Oh, I know. You're not supposed to mess with it (much).
But, it can make booting faster, and did with Vista--but...my CPU was of lesser number of cores.
I guess compatibility varies. Sometimes you can set it and not have a problem; other times, nope.
At any rate, I don't touch that setting (or, really try not to touch anything in MSCONFIG) anymore.

Starting Task Manager and clicking on Performance screen, one can see if (or how many) cores/processors are active and being used,
despite whatever MSCONFIG says (even if it says 1 processor/core).
 
Mar 5, 2019
15
2
15
0
Could it be there's a language difference? There's only 1 processor on my motherboard. Happens to have 4 cores.
Look at your 'CPU Usage History' on the Performance tab of Task Manager. If you see multiple small graph/screens there, that's
the number of processors Windows is using.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Again, language. Mainstream motherboards socket 1 Processor. There are supermicro server motherboards that socket 12 Processors. Msconfig is not task manager. Msconfig is counting the physical amount of cpus. Task Manager uses cpu 0 through cpu x to count the thread total, not the processor total. Sockets: 1, Cores: 4, Logical processors: 8, for my i7.
 
Mar 5, 2019
15
2
15
0
Again, language. Mainstream motherboards socket 1 Processor. There are supermicro server motherboards that socket 12 Processors. Msconfig is not task manager. Msconfig is counting the physical amount of cpus. Task Manager uses cpu 0 through cpu x to count the thread total, not the processor total. Sockets: 1, Cores: 4, Logical processors: 8, for my i7.
I know what you're trying to say, but these days 'processor' and 'cpu' are synonymous (even in Windows itself).
A 'central processing unit' may have many 'processors' or 'cores' (the latter two also synonymous).

I never said MSCONFIG was TASK MANAGER--I distinguished a difference between them.
This graphic shows my current (Vista) machine. It has no problem with it set to 2 (and the dropdown menu only shows 2)
That's SINGLE CPU with TWO processors or cores. Taskmanager, shown at the right in the image, shows the activity from
the two cores (aka processors, generally), but we know there is only a SINGLE CPU in the machine, despite Taskmanager
saying 'CPU Usage History' and showing two activity windows.

 

Similar threads


ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS