Ford Turning Off PCs at Night to Save $1.2M

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jomofro39

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The fact that this is just NOW news, explains to me why the American auto industry is failing. FAIL. Get it together. I bet next year we will learn that they are starting to turn off lights in rooms they do not use.
 

daniel266

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The americans are the one that cant turn off the pc they think that it doesnt matter ..hope that the reccesion make them think ..
 

babybeluga

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I bet they paid the consulting firm (who told them how to save money by turning off their computers) $1 million for this revelation.
 

loomis86

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This all sounds like BS to me. Are they going to power down the UPS system too? How bout the building HVAC systems? Security systems? PCs go into sleep mode pretty quick and don't use much energy.
 

Sicundercover

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This is a short sighted idea. People tend to forget about the ware and tare caused by the constant expansion and contraction caused by heating and cooling from turning machines off all night long.

This will reduce the life expectancy of the machines thereby costing more money for replacing them in the long run and increase the amount of old computer parts in landfills.

Smarter Move : Ford putting solar panels on top of the massive structures they own.
 

danwat1234

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The junior college that I attend (Portland Community) does shut down their PCs at night, however, they ALL turn on (in class rooms, labs,offices, etc..) at 7:30 in the morning, regardless of whether or not the PCs will be used in the morning. Furthermore they are not configured to go into sleep mode ever.

Bah.. I think that I'm going to have to write the IT Department an email!

So many people don't realize how much of our energy is created by fossil fuels.
 

tipoo

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They probably discovered it by accident too. A janitor at the office accidentally flipped a switch that turned them off then they noticed the savings in their power bill.
 

Judguh

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That works for a company that large.

The company that I work for... not so much. We roll out updates and patches weeknights and weekends. Its just much easier to have the users leave their machines on than wasting extra time to figure out why you can't remote into that person's computer. Depends on the scenario I guess.

Overall - good for Ford! Keep on innovating!!
 

NewJohnny

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[citation][nom]sicundercover[/nom]This is a short sighted idea. People tend to forget about the ware and tare caused by the constant expansion and contraction caused by heating and cooling from turning machines off all night long. This will reduce the life expectancy of the machines thereby costing more money for replacing them in the long run and increase the amount of old computer parts in landfills. Smarter Move : Ford putting solar panels on top of the massive structures they own.[/citation]
Why would someone downvote you? He's right, this is what killed all those hp laptops from 2006-07. The nvidia chip unbonded from the boards due to thermal stress. It's also what kills lightbulbs.
 

theroguex

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[citation][nom]sicundercover[/nom]This is a short sighted idea. People tend to forget about the ware and tare caused by the constant expansion and contraction caused by heating and cooling from turning machines off all night long. This will reduce the life expectancy of the machines thereby costing more money for replacing them in the long run and increase the amount of old computer parts in landfills.[/citation]

Your argument is flawed. Do you even know how companies like this work? They lease the computers for probably no more than 2 years. Then, they get new ones. The old ones are refurbished and resold to other businesses and/or individuals.
 

RazberyBandit

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If only GM and Chrysler had thought of this 2 or 3 years ago. Maybe they wouldn't have needed a bail-out.

It boggles my mind why companies, especially huge ones that can see incredible savings, haven't been doing this for years. It saves money, plain and simple.
 

anonymousdude

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[citation][nom]NewJohnny[/nom]Why would someone downvote you? He's right, this is what killed all those hp laptops from 2006-07. The nvidia chip unbonded from the boards due to thermal stress. It's also what kills lightbulbs.[/citation]


Those hp laptops that died were due to a fault on nvidia's part not hp.
 
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Ford's expert team of financial correspondents must be really proud of themselves. I mean, it is common sense after all- given that it took them a few decades to figure it out. Good job Ford, you guys really deserved it.
 
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At my company we all received laptops already 7 years ago. Multiple savings: laptops generally use less energy, half of the people needed one anyway to be able to work on the move, you can take them to meetings and finally you are forced to switch them off at the end of the day because it's not secure to leave them on your desk at night...
 

belardo

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With Windows7, which its sleep / hibernation modes actually work - for the first time for a MS-OS... I have my settings for putting my PC in sleep mode after 1hr... in case I forget or fall asleep.

There is no flashing light, no fans, nothing. A press of a key on the keyboard or power button will get me back to the login/lock screen in 2~3 seconds... not bad. If I had an SSD, it maybe could be 1sec :)

So having a PC running idle all night is a waste of power, wear and tear on the drives, etc. If I'm going out for an hour, I'd shutdown or sleep before I go.

Electric bills are already high enough.
 

rackley

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I used to work at Ford and I remember this guy. He has no regard for impact on end user productivity - the people who actually make the company run. Why not hibernate the systems instead? You'll get the same power savings with far less impact to users. Doesn't he realize the Office documents are not the only things that run on computers? Engineering apps? Browsers? Notes taken in Notepad? Opened emails? There is very little thought behind this. FAIL for employees, BIG BONUS for him because he can flash some big numbers. Just like he did for previous projects.
 
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