News Forget Water Cooling, Check Out This $7,300 Passive CPU Cooler

ex_bubblehead

Champion
Moderator
I'm in full agreement with the Colonel. The images accompanying the story are obviously raytraces from Blender or such. And, with only one point of contact between each ball there's no way there will be much in the way of heat transfer. I call scam without even needing any numbers.
 

ben_xman

Reputable
Mar 18, 2016
15
0
4,510
0
With every sphere in those stacks the transfer efficiency is horribly decreased. There is next to no surface area touching between each ball meaning after only a few cm, or heck, right there at the point that grouping meets the base barely any heat is being transferred.

Why offer a steel version? Are they unaware of how inefficient steel is at conducting heat?

Why 3D print the bases instead of just molding or milling it? Looks like the design would be far easier to mold or mill from stock than to spend the many more hours and expensive resources like filament and electricity 3D printing it. That's not going to add any sort of performance or structural benefit.

It's just a flashy design trying to be sold by looks (and wow, it costs so much upfront, so very Apple of us) without any real engineering thought put into it. I'd be surprised if it works any better than older intel stock coolers with the fan removed. Much less anyone actually getting one with how prototype it looks right now.
 
Last edited:

spongiemaster

Prominent
Dec 12, 2019
609
286
760
0

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
A couple hours in Blender/Rhino, and a day to print...I could make make something that looks exactly like that.

Show us one actually installed.
thinking too hard, the spheres can be shaped into the top of a plastic bottle, looks like they were shaped in the top pf a plastic bottle.
spheres, glue, bottle and the tops are made,
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
129,458
5,232
165,040
20,037
Why 3D print the bases instead of just molding or milling it?
Because "3D printing" is cool and edgy.

"3D printed heat transfer base, heat exchanger based on pebblebed reactor design. Carbon fiber infused individual spheres specifically sized as to location and contact with all its neighbors, resulting in optimal thermal transfer."

A little more massaging of the text, and anything sounds cool enough.
 
Reactions: thisisaname

escksu

Prominent
Aug 8, 2019
153
41
610
0
If its a real product, there is only 2 materials that could work and so costly. Graphene and pyrolytic graphite. I am guess those grey balls are graphene - copper foam balls or pyrolytic graphite balls.

But one downside. Regardless of superior thermal conductivity, you still need adequate air flow, else it wont work
 
More importantly, it's unknown how the CPU cooler is fastened to the CPU socket on the motherboard.
Zip Ties.

This reminds me of that "Sketchy Heatsinks" series on Linus Tech Tips, where they attempt to make their own CPU cooler using various methods. Though this one may look better, assuming the renders are reasonably accurate and they don't just send you a melted blob of aluminum.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZHtlY6aDMw


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vL72lQ6dRZU


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3B1kjxO0sxM
 

derekullo

Distinguished
Top 10 Thermally Conductive Materials
Diamond
Silver
Copper
Gold
Aluminum Nitride
Silicon Carbide
Aluminum
Tungsten
Graphite
Zinc

https://thermtest.com/thermal-resources/top-10-thermally-conductive-materials

Obviously the best materials for a $7000 fan-less supercomputer heat-sink would be diamond balls suspended in a silver framework mounted to a TR4 socket.

Silver melts at 961°C and diamond melts at 4027°C in the absence of oxygen so this would technically be feasible.

Sadly neither diamond nor silver is organic, with silver even being antimicrobial.
 

GenericUser

Distinguished
Nov 20, 2010
156
31
18,740
12
I've never used etsy, so I'm just going to guess they must have absolutely awful return/refund policies for someone to want to risk selling frivolous garbage.
 

Avro Arrow

Distinguished
BANNED
"There doesn't seem to be any heat pipes, though, which raises the question of how it transfers the heat to the balls. And we can't quite figure out what the term "organic" in the title means. "
:homer:

On a more serious note, my guess is that the "organic" refers to the balls themselves which appear to be made of carbon with their non-reflective surfaces.
 
Last edited:

HotRod5353

Distinguished
May 20, 2011
13
4
18,510
0
Only 7000 dollars? Can't someone come up with another cooler... not as good or as easy as water cooling , and sell it for 7 million dollars.
 

Olle P

Distinguished
Apr 7, 2010
662
48
19,040
24
In a pebble-bed reactor, convection flow is enough to keep it from melting down. There could be something to the design.
That's in line with my thoughts also, but with some caveats.

.., you still need adequate air flow, else it wont work.
That's one of the caveats. Probably won't be much natural convection through the pellet stacks.

Pebble beds only work where there is some medium to transfer heat. Air will not flow through this so there is no transfer medium.
It's possible to force air through. Pebbles are often used in filters for compressed air, so that shouldn't be a problem, but then if won't be fanless...

As for mounting: Screws with their heads on the other side of the motherboard holding the base down? We don't get to see the size of the base.

I can see this product as "possible", but with big questions regarding its efficiency, both in absolute terms and relative to price and weight.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS