[SOLVED] Frequent crashes to desktop on older (but still capable) system ?

Jan 31, 2021
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My specs are as follows:
Intel 2600 (Early 2011)
MSI P67A-GD65 (Early 2011, updated to last BIOS)
14GB DDR3 (1333 mHz)
Gigabyte RX 570 4GB "Gaming OC" (bought Q3 2018)
Antec HCG850 Bronze (850W Bronze)
Windows 10 Pro (latest)

My problem:
Over the course of the last one and a half years I have had stability issues in a number of games. Examples of these include Kingdom Come Deliverance, Nier Automata, Dark Souls 3, Apex Legends and Need For Speed Heat. By instability, I'm specifically referring to crashes to desktop and some BSOD with the message "MEMORY_MANAGEMENT". These occur very frequently - every 20-30 minutes, sometimes less.

What I've tried:

The temps aren't a problem: 60 °C on the CPU and 70 °C on the GPU. I've ran memory tests, with no errors being reported. I've tried multiple different versions of AMD's drivers. I disabled as many background apps and overlays as I could (including Steam and Radeon overlay).

My request:
I assume my pc is too old. Yet I've seen many people online claim that the CPU is still a-okay today. Would I (based on your experience) have the same issue 5 years from now after spending $1000+ on a new rig? Is it merely a problem with AMD GPUs? Is there anything else I could try?
 
Reactions: Jesga_5T
The aging issue will affect all systems that are used for gaming, mainly because:
  • Capacitors (electrolytes) on mainboard and inside PSU dries out and explodes. Some of those are visible damaged, you can see the top lid are pressed outwards and re no longer flat, or have leaked fluid on the bottom (typical issue with the one that doesn't have pins that goes through the PCB board.
  • Thermal paste dries out so that the component (chip, voltage regulator, etc) heats up and stop working properly.
  • Soldering points got cracks and there got a point of failure in a current path. This is mostly a problem where heavy components are mounded, often in ad around voltage regulators, but also underneath surface mounted chips - if latter, almost impossible to self-repair.
Your request : This is one that is impossible to fully answer, because it totally depends on the factors
  • quality of the products.
  • Your skill as a pc builder when it comes to handling delicate parts (eg. when inserting RAM - do you just press them down or do you also take bending of the mainboard in consideration and place it on a flat surface - preferably on the anti-static sheet that was in the package ; and do you always have esd damage in mind when handling the components?)
  • How often the system in use (numbers of shutdowns and startups from cold)
  • How much power is used (the more powerful CPU/GPU the more stress for PSU and onboard voltage regulators).
My own experience in the past (may not apply today) is that a gaming rig can last from 4 - 8 years before some component become faulty).
 
The aging issue will affect all systems that are used for gaming, mainly because:
  • Capacitors (electrolytes) on mainboard and inside PSU dries out and explodes. Some of those are visible damaged, you can see the top lid are pressed outwards and re no longer flat, or have leaked fluid on the bottom (typical issue with the one that doesn't have pins that goes through the PCB board.
  • Thermal paste dries out so that the component (chip, voltage regulator, etc) heats up and stop working properly.
  • Soldering points got cracks and there got a point of failure in a current path. This is mostly a problem where heavy components are mounded, often in ad around voltage regulators, but also underneath surface mounted chips - if latter, almost impossible to self-repair.
Your request : This is one that is impossible to fully answer, because it totally depends on the factors
  • quality of the products.
  • Your skill as a pc builder when it comes to handling delicate parts (eg. when inserting RAM - do you just press them down or do you also take bending of the mainboard in consideration and place it on a flat surface - preferably on the anti-static sheet that was in the package ; and do you always have esd damage in mind when handling the components?)
  • How often the system in use (numbers of shutdowns and startups from cold)
  • How much power is used (the more powerful CPU/GPU the more stress for PSU and onboard voltage regulators).
My own experience in the past (may not apply today) is that a gaming rig can last from 4 - 8 years before some component become faulty).
 

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