[SOLVED] Fresh build is giving me a headache, persistent reboot/blue screen problems

Nov 15, 2021
1
0
10
0
To begin this is my first endeavor into the world of custom PC building. I assembled my machine with the help of a friend who is somewhat experienced in this world but my problems have thrown both of us for a loop.

My setup:
CPU: Ryzen 5800x
Cooler: Deep Cool Castle 240EX AIO
Motherboard: Gigabyte Aero X570s
GPU: EVGA 3080 XC3 Ultra
RAM: T-Force 16 gb 4000 (x4)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 2 Tb
PSU: Corsair SF750 Platinum

plus an excessive amount of case fans and RGB

Full specs: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/AnEnormousPanda/builds/#view=xXK48d

Currently when running high demand games or even nothing at all my PC restarts. I've discovered I can replicate the problem running COD Vanguard on ultra settings in 1440p and then kicks me back to the screen where I can enter the BIOS. Occasionally it kicks me back to a blue screen and displays "WHEA_Uncorrectable_Error" and then reboots (this is becoming more common).

My friend and I speculate that it may be a power supply issue but tracking power consumption with MSI Afterburner as far as I can tell my setup doesn't get anywhere close to the 750w my PSU can provide.

Looking for some advice from those that know more than I. I really want this PC to work so I don't have to go back to my old gaming laptop. My next step as far as I can tell is upgrading to an 850w PSU and crossing my fingers.

Will clean up wiring when problems cease.

 

geofelt

Titan
I can see a couple of potential problems.
1.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
Ram must be matched for proper operation.
It looks like you have two separate kits.
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

To save time, run with just one single kit to test.
You can sometimes compensate for errors by increasing the ram voltage in the motherboard bios.

2. Run hwmonitor or such to measure minimum and max temperatures. At idle, you should see 15-20c. over ambient and
<95c. under a stress test. Your radiator mount shows the intake and out flow hoses to be higher than the cpu pump.
That is not bad, but if there is air in the system, your cooling flow will not be good. In time, all aio coolers will get air intrusion, requiring a replacement.

3. While 750w should be sufficient for a 3080, it seems that those cards can have very high demand spikes.
See if you can't test with a stronger quality psu.
Strong Quality SFX power supplies are not easy to find.
This cm unit is white and has a 10 year warranty.

4. Is the bios up to date?

5. You are likely to do better running windows 10 for now, and not windows 11.

6. It looks like you have custom psu cables.
Unless they are supplied by Corsair explicitly for your psu, they may not be doing the job.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: kurdtnz
Looking for some advice from those that know more than I.
What is that glass thing over graphics card? It probably impedes heat dissipation from graphics card.

Check cpu and gpu temperatures.

Can you show screenshots from CPU-Z - memory and spd sections?
You may want to try with 2 modules (instead of 4) and test stability.

And AIO radiator should be turned upside down. Currently there will be air bubbles in upper part of radiator, they will get circled to cpu block.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Krotow

Victorino95

Honorable
Nov 20, 2016
13
0
10,510
0
Can you check your event viewer for a memory dump? run WinDbg with the dump file and maybe post the results. That error is hardware related according to the lists found Online.
 

geofelt

Titan
I can see a couple of potential problems.
1.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
Ram must be matched for proper operation.
It looks like you have two separate kits.
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

To save time, run with just one single kit to test.
You can sometimes compensate for errors by increasing the ram voltage in the motherboard bios.

2. Run hwmonitor or such to measure minimum and max temperatures. At idle, you should see 15-20c. over ambient and
<95c. under a stress test. Your radiator mount shows the intake and out flow hoses to be higher than the cpu pump.
That is not bad, but if there is air in the system, your cooling flow will not be good. In time, all aio coolers will get air intrusion, requiring a replacement.

3. While 750w should be sufficient for a 3080, it seems that those cards can have very high demand spikes.
See if you can't test with a stronger quality psu.
Strong Quality SFX power supplies are not easy to find.
This cm unit is white and has a 10 year warranty.

4. Is the bios up to date?

5. You are likely to do better running windows 10 for now, and not windows 11.

6. It looks like you have custom psu cables.
Unless they are supplied by Corsair explicitly for your psu, they may not be doing the job.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: kurdtnz

ASK THE COMMUNITY