Question Fried Motherboard need advice.

Aug 16, 2022
5
0
10
0
There was a power outage and after that my pc won’t boot, nothing I did worked but the pc had power, fans worked and lights turned on everywhere. Didn’t know what to do so I took it to a technician and he told me that my mother board is fried. Now I’m wondering if I should get the same one, get a better one and if I should also upgrade my CPU or something. PC was working fine and didn’t have any problem running any games I played.

Fried Motherboard: Gigabyte B450M DS3H
GPU: RTX 2070 Super
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
RAM: 2x16 Corsair Vengeance 3600mhz

also been told that if My motherboard fried I should consider switching PSU. So was wondering what I need to consider when getting an new Motherboard and a new PSU
 
There was a power outage and after that my pc won’t boot, nothing I did worked but the pc had power, fans worked and lights turned on everywhere. Didn’t know what to do so I took it to a technician and he told me that my mother board is fried. Now I’m wondering if I should get the same one, get a better one and if I should also upgrade my CPU or something. PC was working fine and didn’t have any problem running any games I played.

Fried Motherboard: Gigabyte B450M DS3H
GPU: RTX 2070 Super
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
RAM: 2x16 Corsair Vengeance 3600mhz
Did the technician give you confidence that the CPU, memory and GPU are functioning normally? That's important because a fried CPU in particular can easily fry a new motherboard when installed and powered on. Assuming everything's OK you've still got a very good system spec-wise. I'd replace the motherboard with a decent B550m board.

But if time isn't an issue and you're itching to use this as an excuse to upgrade then wait a couple months for the new tech (new generations of CPU's, motherboards, memory and GPU's) to drop. It will almost certainly be more expensive...but then it may also bring on further price reductions of the current stuff. So you could (somewhat briefly perhaps) get a new motherboard and a 5800X3d CPU quite a bit cheaper than right now.

If money's also no issue then wait for the new tech to come available.
 
I'm still trying to understand how power outage fried a motherboard...

What kind of power outage was it?
Typically, it's not the power outage that takes out hardware. It's the accompanying power surge that can also come when power is restored.

It also happens that the outage occurred because of a lightening strike close-by. The surge from same lightening strike can blast through surge protectors weakened by previous surges.
 
Aug 16, 2022
5
0
10
0
I'm still trying to understand how power outage fried a motherboard...

What kind of power outage was it?
My dad was setting up new light switches all around the house and he accidentally caused the power to fall while I was playing. Tried to turn on my pc and the fans and everything would work but the pc wouldn’t boot. I’m not a technician but the technician I took my pc to said my motherboard is fried.
 
Aug 16, 2022
5
0
10
0
Did the technician give you confidence that the CPU, memory and GPU are functioning normally? That's important because a fried CPU in particular can easily fry a new motherboard when installed and powered on. Assuming everything's OK you've still got a very good system spec-wise. I'd replace the motherboard with a decent B550m board.

But if time isn't an issue and you're itching to use this as an excuse to upgrade then wait a couple months for the new tech (new generations of CPU's, motherboards, memory and GPU's) to drop. It will almost certainly be more expensive...but then it may also bring on further price reductions of the current stuff. So you could (somewhat briefly perhaps) get a new motherboard and a 5800X3d CPU quite a bit cheaper than right now.

If money's also no issue then wait for the new tech to come available.
Would you recommend I switch PSU after that sudden power outage or not?
 
My dad was setting up new light switches all around the house and he accidentally caused the power to fall while I was playing. Tried to turn on my pc and the fans and everything would work but the pc wouldn’t boot. I’m not a technician but the technician I took my pc to said my motherboard is fried.
Now THAT seems suspicious. Just throwing a circuit off-line shouldn't do something like this. It's really no different from turning the switch off at the PSU.

If the system saw a surge that got through the PSU to the motherboard...yes I'd say it should also be replaced.
 
Aug 16, 2022
5
0
10
0
Now THAT seems suspicious. Just throwing a circuit off-line shouldn't do something like this. It's really no different from turning the switch off at the PSU.

If the system saw a surge that got through the PSU to the motherboard...yes I'd say it should also be replaced.
It isn’t the first time it happens tho, since I got my pc 2 years ago this has happens around 20-30 times. I’m gonna ask tmrw the technicians opinion but I wanted to ask here first for an unbiased opinion. How would I know if I should also switch PSU?
 
Typically, it's not the power outage that takes out hardware. It's the accompanying power surge that can also come when power is restored.

It also happens that the outage occurred because of a lightening strike close-by. The surge from same lightening strike can blast through surge protectors weakened by previous surges.
That was what I'm thinking.

Any house should have the most basic protection against a sudden power surge?
 
Aug 16, 2022
5
0
10
0
If it changes anything I am not from the US, I’m from Israel so some things regarding buildings,houses and apartments are different here.
 
If it changes anything I am not from the US, I’m from Israel so some things regarding buildings,houses and apartments are different here.
Aahhh, yes. In some countries it even goes against the law to work on your own house wiring, e.g., Australia. But electricity is the same, just different methods and products used to make it safe.

As far as knowing if you should replace the PSU: it's very hard to know. If you have a basic knowledge of electronics you can make a few checks (like check voltages with a meter) while it's safely disconnected from the motherboard. But voltages being within tolerance with no load isn't enough, you really have to put a significant load on the PSU and check voltage then.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY