Question From Intel 4th gen to 10th gen CPU

Sep 16, 2020
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I currently have an Intel Core i5-4670K CPU with an RTX 2060 GPU playing games such DOOM Eternal, GTA V and Witcher 3 at 1080p 60Hz. I just saw the Watch Dogs Legion requirements and I wanna be ready for it when it comes out.

This current CPU is from 2013 and it may bottleneck future upgrades sooner or later.
Basically I'm looking for the safest moment to upgrade CPU/Mobo/RAM combo and keep my current GPU so when it's time to upgrade it, my new CPU is ready to handle it.

I got the chance to buy a 10th gen combo with an i5-10600K but before doing this I saw many details, it lacks of PCIe 4.0, newer GPUs will have it (RTX 30 already have it) and I heard DDR5 memory is already out there too.

My question is should I upgrade my i5-4670K to an i5-10600K right now?

If y'all see this CPU upgrade unnecessary yet, my second option is look for a better monitor instead, still 1080p but 120 or 144Hz.

My whole actual rig is this:
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4GHz Quad-Core
  • CPU Cooler: Intel stock
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z97X-SLI
  • Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3-1866 CL9
  • SSD: Samsung 850 EVO 250GB 2.5"
  • HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB
  • GPU: Asus RTX2060 6GB DUAL Advanced
  • PSU: Thermaltake SMART 750W 80+ Bronze
  • Monitor: Asus VX228H 21.5" 1920x1080 60Hz
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
DDR5 isn't coming to mainstream until next year at the earliest with AMD's AM5 and Intel's LGA1700 sockets, so it isn't a consideration for any upgrade this year. If you want PCIe4 on an Intel platform, you will have to wait for Rocket Lake either late this year or early 2021.

From benchmarks so far, the RTX3080 is doing fine on 3.0x16 with its 10GB of VRAM but things could be different on the RTX3070 with only 8GB. We'll see how much it benefits from 4.0x16 in VRAM-intensive scenarios where 8GB isn't enough anymore when the reviews land.
 

Rodrigodrt

Honorable
Nov 21, 2014
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Well, I did basically the same thing you're planning to do, went from 4770k (the best processor of all galaxies) to a 10700k, but the 10600k when overclocked performs the same, just less cores, personally i ignored pcie 4.0 for a few reasons, I already have samsung 850 PRO with a 10 year warranty wich i havent used even 5 yet, so im sticking to it, i see no reason to go m2 cause loading times are virtually the same, second, gpus wont get any boosts from pcie 4, they cant saturate the pcie 3 yet, so thats also fine, third, its likely that pcie 5.0 will be out reaaal fast, its already on the make since 2017, so god knows, maybe in 2-3 years, bam, pcie 5.0, so you could leap from 3 to 5.

if you need right NOW, 10600k is currently the best option, well if you have the extra buck you could 10700k just for more cores, but really no need for that, HOWEVER, if you can hold ot it a bit more, the 11gen intel will support pcie 4.0 anyways, and should drop by first half 2021... it may be overal just slightly better than the 10 series plus a needless pcie 4 support but then again... shrugs.

I bought 10700k as said, and couldnt be happied, things is a monster, and frankly much cooler than haswell was, i get like tooopps random peaks of 75c with a 5.2 oc, with 5.0 oc, it doesnt even hit 70 :)
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
its likely that pcie 5.0 will be out reaaal fast, its already on the make since 2017, so god knows, maybe in 2-3 years, bam, pcie 5.0, so you could leap from 3 to 5.
The PCIe5 standard was finalized in 2019, only a year ago. The only stuff available for it besides the specs is testing equipment and a few prototype devices. It'll take considerably better PCBs, connectors and more precise on-chip circuitry to handle signaling at 32Gbps. Since PCIe 4.0 is pushing the limits of what can be done on FR4-like PCBs already, it is entirely possible that 5.0 and beyond will be deemed too impractical and costly for the consumer space.

The likely next step is on-package photonics - keep the ultra-high-speed electrical signaling on-package to eliminate connector and PCB bottlenecks, and use optical fibers to connect things that require ludicrous bandwidth together.
 

Rodrigodrt

Honorable
Nov 21, 2014
632
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11,290
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The PCIe5 standard was finalized in 2019, only a year ago. The only stuff available for it besides the specs is testing equipment and a few prototype devices. It'll take considerably better PCBs, connectors and more precise on-chip circuitry to handle signaling at 32Gbps. Since PCIe 4.0 is pushing the limits of what can be done on FR4-like PCBs already, it is entirely possible that 5.0 and beyond will be deemed too impractical and costly for the consumer space.

The likely next step is on-package photonics - keep the ultra-high-speed electrical signaling on-package to eliminate connector and PCB bottlenecks, and use optical fibers to connect things that require ludicrous bandwidth together.
good info, of course there was a lot of rumors about intel not adopting pice 4.0 because they just were gonna skip it for pcie 5.0 , but you know, i like to treat it just like a possibility
 

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