Question Frontier Network - Coax for Multiple Routers?

Feb 18, 2020
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I am running Frontier FiOS with an ONT sending signal through Coax. I currently have one Arrus Modem/ wifi router (supplied by Frontier) receiving signal, but want to set up one or two additional wifi routers to extend signal, preferably without reducing bandwidth. Existing coax lines appear as though they would handle most of this routing, but I don't understand what type of signal is coming through the output coax and what equipment it needs to run through to become a workable ethernet signal. The attached schematic should help clarify. I am trying to solve for the yellow items and have labeled them for ease of reference.

Item 1) Where is the best place for me to splice this signal from? Before Frontier 2-way split? Change to 3-way split? After modem?
Item 2) What will it take for this coax signal to become identifiable to a standard wifi router?
Item 3) What will it take for this coax signal to become identifiable to a standard wifi router?

 
Feb 18, 2020
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You set up the other routers with Cat5e, not coax.

Coax from the ONT to the main router, Cat5e to the other routers and devices.
I'm confused as to what wiring you have available at each area. I think I've got answers to your questions once I know that.
Okay, thanks in advance for any ideas. There is one coax and one Ethernet coming out of the wall at Terminal 3. This Ethernet cord is not coming from the existing router so my best guess is that it's output from ONT but since I intend to keep running in coax mode I don't think it's useful. I want to hook up a WiFi router here.

The output by Terminal one is a coax from the wall wired to the ONT which is hooked to Frontier supplied 2-way splitter and Frontier Arris modem and router.

To my knowledge these are the only two "hot" coax outputs in the house. The third length of coax runs from a male nub on one wall into another room I'm trying to get to, so I'd love to connect something from Terminal One with signal to this wire to supply additional router.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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You set up the other routers with Cat5e, not coax.

Coax from the ONT to the main router, Cat5e to the other routers and devices.
I recognize this would certainly be an option if I ran new Cat5e through the home but I'm trying to utilise the coax which is already there from a previous owner. I have seen some how-to info online showing this is an option people have used in the past and I'm just trying to better understand some of the technical details.
 

USAFRet

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The main FiOS router is MOCA enabled. If the other routers are also MOCA capable, then I believe 'just coax' will work.

From the ONT (in the garage?), the ethernet signal is already injected into the coax. The main router extracts that and can provide regular ethernet via Cat5e or WiFi.
If the other routers are also MOCA capable devices, then those too should be able to extract that same signal and provide it out to devices.
You just have to be sure to turn most of the "router" function OFF. DHCP, etc. You want only one DHCP server on this LAN.

If the other routers are NOT MOCA capable devices, then you need a dedicated MOCA device.
Such as this:
https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Bonded-Ethernet-Adapter-ECB6200K02/dp/B013J7O3X0

That extracts the signal from the coax and converts into something a regular router or PC can use.

I have one of those to provide ethernet signal upstairs. (Verizon FiOS).
 
Feb 18, 2020
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The main FiOS router is MOCA enabled. If the other routers are also MOCA capable, then I believe 'just coax' will work.

From the ONT (in the garage?), the ethernet signal is already injected into the coax. The main router extracts that and can provide regular ethernet via Cat5e or WiFi.
If the other routers are also MOCA capable devices, then those too should be able to extract that same signal and provide it out to devices.
You just have to be sure to turn most of the "router" function OFF. DHCP, etc. You want only one DHCP server on this LAN.

If the other routers are NOT MOCA capable devices, then you need a dedicated MOCA device.
Such as this:
https://www.amazon.com/Actiontec-Bonded-Ethernet-Adapter-ECB6200K02/dp/B013J7O3X0

That extracts the signal from the coax and converts into something a regular router or PC can use.

I have one of those to provide ethernet signal upstairs. (Verizon FiOS).
Okay thank you thank you, that is all super helpful. I am understanding this a bit more now. One additional question I have would be regarding this terminal near the #1 in my diagram - where I have my current router and the split coax and all that - what is the best way to go from there to get to that other length of coax? Should I change the 2-split to a 3-split and lead a coax (or is that even possible? I don't understand why there are 2 to begin with.) or would it be better to add a MOCA device between that ethernet output and the next coax terminal?
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Good catch, thanks. That item actually is installed and it is the Arris MOCA, supplied by Frontier. I labeled it "modem" before I understood that. So do you know why I need the coax going to both that router AND the MOCA? That is how Frontier had this set up but I don't understand why there are two separate cords going to both or how that would even work. What I am trying to get to is an additional output here to lead to the other coax /MOCA/router that will live at top of diagram, so that's why I'm asking if I can make the 2-split into a 3-split etc
 

USAFRet

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A 3 split should work.

Basically, you need a MOCA device where you want an ethernet signal. That can be a MOCA capable router, or a dedicated MOCA device.
That spits out an ethernet signal to your devices.

And all the coax has to meet somewhere.
 

SamirD

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Jan 16, 2014
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Moca can be quite confusing but the gist of it is like USAFRet says--you basically need moca capable equipment and cable lines that are all connected to each other.

But I am also confused by you have both a moca device and a router at location 1. What are the model numbers of these devices? And exactly how are they wired to location 3.

For location 2--do you know where this coax wire terminates?
 

USAFRet

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Moca can be quite confusing but the gist of it is like USAFRet says--you basically need moca capable equipment and cable lines that are all connected to each other.

But I am also confused by you have both a moca device and a router at location 1. What are the model numbers of these devices? And exactly how are they wired to location 3.

For location 2--do you know where this coax wire terminates?
If that "router" is MOCA capable by itself, then you do not need another MOCA device.
But most routers are not MOCA capable by themselves.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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If that "router" is MOCA capable by itself, then you do not need another MOCA device.
But most routers are not MOCA capable by themselves.
Yes, strangely, though it's from Frontier themselves, it's apparently a non-MOCA router that they then supply with a MOCA device. I still don't understand the technical workings of how coax goes to both the router and the MOCA device separately and somehow that bridges them.
 

SamirD

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Jan 16, 2014
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Yes, strangely, though it's from Frontier themselves, it's apparently a non-MOCA router that they then supply with a MOCA device. I still don't understand the technical workings of how coax goes to both the router and the MOCA device separately and somehow that bridges them.
That's why the model numbers will help clear this up. I know Frontier makes moca capable routers too--just not sure why they would also give you a moca adapter as well.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Possibly my last question on this before I buy parts. I am either going to change from a 2-way splitter (Starburst MoCA 2-Way Splitter / 2x 3.5db) to a 3-way splitter (This one?: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00VU61AKC/ref=dp_cerb_1 ) or route the additional line from Cat5e to MoCa Adapter back to Coax - Would one of these create more signal loss than the other? I am leaning toward going with Router > Cat5e > MoCA Adapter > Coax > MoCA Adaptor or MoCa Enabled Router
 

USAFRet

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That's why the model numbers will help clear this up. I know Frontier makes moca capable routers too--just not sure why they would also give you a moca adapter as well.
Verizon did on my most recent install 5 years ago.

The router, of course. And also a MOCA device which I'm using to deliver the signal upstairs.
He gave it to me free, because I did so much of his initial work. All he had to do was install the new ONT, plug the router in, wait for it to sync.
Job sched for 2 hours, done in 30 mins.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Possibly my last question on this before I buy parts. I am either going to change from a 2-way splitter (Starburst MoCA 2-Way Splitter / 2x 3.5db) to a 3-way splitter (This one?: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00VU61AKC/ref=dp_cerb_1 ) or route the additional line from Cat5e to MoCa Adapter back to Coax - Would one of these create more signal loss than the other? I am leaning toward going with Router > Cat5e > MoCA Adapter > Coax > MoCA Adaptor or MoCa Enabled Router
If the wire from the ONT to the router is already coax...the ethernet signal is already injected into the coax.
You simply need a MOCA device to extract it at the desired location.

It does NOT need to come from the router.
 

SamirD

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Jan 16, 2014
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MOCA(?): Arris MEB1100
Router: Arris NVG468MQ
Thank you. Based on this, you shouldn't buy anything yet as there's a lot more questions now.

Both of these are moca devices. If there is coax going into both of them, then the MEB1100 is not necessary at that location and you should be able to move it to either of the other locations to see if you can get a moca connection there. I would do this first before you buy anything. Report back your findings.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Sorry for the late reply here but I finally attempted this.
  1. When I disconnect the MEB1100 - which hooks to an input on the NVG labeled "ONT", the router ceases to carry an internet signal (indicated by light on NVG device and confirmed with connected devices on network). It appears that both devices need to be connected in this way to function properly.
  2. If I hook both MEB and NVG in the same configuration into another coax terminal in the home (Junction 3 in my original diagram) they function properly the same they do when hooked in at their original terminal (Area near #1 on my original diagram)
  3. I have ordered 2 MoCA adapters and plan to use one with another (Non-MoCA ready) router I own to see if the combination of the two will function at Junction 3.
 

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