[SOLVED] Future Proofed (6+ years) 1440p gaming computer

alexswede

Commendable
Apr 26, 2017
79
3
1,535
0
I've been saving up for a new computer for a while now, seeing as my current one has so many switched out components that if i want to replace one now i would have to replace 5 others aswell. I recently bought a 1440p monitor based off a lot of positive feedback i got from friends as well as forums. Im still rather young, so i dont have a full time job, so i want to get a new rig that's as future proofed as possible, but still for a reasonable price (nothing insane, like 5000$ or something). Im looking to be able to play most games from now to 6+ years at 1440p and a stable 60+ FPS. Here is what i came up with based on pre built models as well as some research ive done of different computer parts and how they work best with each other (im no engineer or computer builder myself). Please let me know what i should change out. Thanks in advance for replies.

Corsair Crystal 570X RGB Tempered Glass Red

Intel Core i7 9700K 3.6 GHz 12MB

Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2080 8GB GAMING OC

Gigabyte Z390 AORUS PRO

Ballistix16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 2666MHz CL16 Sport AT

Corsair Force MP510 960GB

Seagate BarraCuda 2TB 7200rpm 256MB

be quiet! ShadowWings 2 140mm

be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4

be quiet! Dark Power Pro 11 1000W

Windows 10 Home English 64-bit OEM
 

13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
To set expectations nothing is future proofed for 6+years.
3 years ago 8 core was on the extreme/server processors only, now it's common and being taken advantage of.
1 year ago no-one was considering ray tracing as being feasible, and current implementations are to seed the market really, in another 2 years?

So it is reasonable to expect a rig like that to last for 3 years on the GPU side and more on the CPU side.

I'd mentally set aside some funds to do a GPU upgrade in 3 years time, see what you want to spend now, and boost the CPU so that's not as much of a constraint in 3 years.

The PSU is too big, go to 600-650W and put that money into the CPU.
 
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alexswede

Commendable
Apr 26, 2017
79
3
1,535
0
To set expectations nothing is future proofed for 6+years.
3 years ago 8 core was on the extreme/server processors only, now it's common and being taken advantage of.
1 year ago no-one was considering ray tracing as being feasible, and current implementations are to seed the market really, in another 2 years?

So it is reasonable to expect a rig like that to last for 3 years on the GPU side and more on the CPU side.

I'd mentally set aside some funds to do a GPU upgrade in 3 years time, see what you want to spend now, and boost the CPU so that's not as much of a constraint in 3 years.

The PSU is too big, go to 600-650W and put that money into the CPU.
What would you recommend on the CPU side of things then? and isn't a 600W PSU just borderline for that kind of rig? Thanks for your reply
 

13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
150W for a CPU is top end for normal CPU's anything else is bleeding edge and will give little extra return.
250W for the GPU is top end (it was getting down to 200W), so that's 400W, add in 50 for everything else and you are about at the sweet spot, so 650 would be very nice.

As for the CPU it all comes down to budget, the 9900k is a beast, but difficult to tame and manage. The 9700k doesn't seem to be great value as you've lost HT in exchange for cores, but 8 solid cores is good (and without historic i7's having HT I'd not complain about that).

Do you need the 'pro' board? is it less likely to fail, maybe a little, but that's all. I think dropping $5k (USD, AUSD is different) on a PC is a bit mad, and you can make some choices that reduce that, i'd be thinking more like $2.5k for something great.

Use PCpartpicker, it's great for testing the overall costs of builds.
 

alexswede

Commendable
Apr 26, 2017
79
3
1,535
0
150W for a CPU is top end for normal CPU's anything else is bleeding edge and will give little extra return.
250W for the GPU is top end (it was getting down to 200W), so that's 400W, add in 50 for everything else and you are about at the sweet spot, so 650 would be very nice.

As for the CPU it all comes down to budget, the 9900k is a beast, but difficult to tame and manage. The 9700k doesn't seem to be great value as you've lost HT in exchange for cores, but 8 solid cores is good (and without historic i7's having HT I'd not complain about that).

Do you need the 'pro' board? is it less likely to fail, maybe a little, but that's all. I think dropping $5k (USD, AUSD is different) on a PC is a bit mad, and you can make some choices that reduce that, i'd be thinking more like $2.5k for something great.

Use PCpartpicker, it's great for testing the overall costs of builds.
Ive heard some bad things against the 9900k (heating, unreliability when OC for example) which made me look at the 9700k, whihc after some research, didnt seem to be that bad as most people mentioned that hyper threading isnt worth switching to a lower core CPU. Some people do tell me to use the i7- 8700k, but i dont know if i feel comfortable using an older model (i know it isnt that old) in what i want to consider a beast pc (currently my CPU is bottlenecking my GPU, so im trying my best to match them or make the CPU a beast.) What would you recommend for the specs i listed?
 

crystalcity

Proper
Dec 5, 2018
108
7
185
2
That build would be fine for me for 12 years.

Just swap out GPU at year 3 or 4 if need be. GPU swap is a lot quicker than whole new system build.
 

alexswede

Commendable
Apr 26, 2017
79
3
1,535
0
That build would be fine for me for 12 years.

Just swap out GPU at year 3 or 4 if need be. GPU swap is a lot quicker than whole new system build.
im sure it will last a rather long time, but i would like to play most games 1440p 60 FPS for at least 3-4 years if possible, thats the goal at least
 

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