Question FX 6300 + GTX 750 TI FPS Question

sergiu.ciocan93

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Apr 26, 2018
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Hello to everyone,

I have a question regarding my system performance.

I've been watching some YouTube gaming reviews with the same configuration as mine getting ~50-60 FPS on games like GTA V at some low-medium settings at 1080p.

Are those reviews legit, as I am only getting ~45 FPS at 1280x1024? If yes, how can I fix this?

I am not complaining about the fps I get as the games are totally playable for me, but I am just curious.

Also, earlier today my PC started to freeze from nowhere. I fixed this by disabling AMD Cool'n'Quiet. Strange.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would update your motherboard BIOS to the latest version if a newer version is available and do a clean install of your graphics drivers after using the DDU to first remove all previous Nvidia drivers.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory tab. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.


Fourth,

Make sure the problem is not just a bad cable or the wrong cable IF this is a no display issue. If it is NOT related to a lack of display signal, then skip to the next step.

This happens a lot. Try a different cable or a different TYPE of cable. Sometimes there can be issues with the monitor or card not supporting a specific specification such as HDMI 1.4 vs HDMI 2.0, or even an HDMI output stops working but the Displayport or DVI output still works fine on the graphics card. Always worth checking the cable and trying other cables because cables get run over, bent, bent pins or simply were cheap quality to begin with and something as simple as trying a different cable or different monitor might be all that is required to solve your issue.


The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Sounds like you need a better CPU cooler, or need to clean the one you have. Maybe re-apply thermal compound.

Also overclocking to consider.

And if you have a cheaper motherboard, the VRMs could be overheating and throttling the processor.

Sometimes lower resolution is also worse. Takes the load off your GPU, but makes the CPU work harder to run the game engine. So more FPS from the CPU might lead to faster overheating. Whereas with a higher resolution and the GPU running at max, the CPU would have idle time and stay cooler.

OS optimization could play a factor. They probably turned EVERYTHING off to get as clean a capture as possible.
 

sergiu.ciocan93

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Apr 26, 2018
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Sounds like you need a better CPU cooler, or need to clean the one you have. Maybe re-apply thermal compound.

Also overclocking to consider.

And if you have a cheaper motherboard, the VRMs could be overheating and throttling the processor.

Sometimes lower resolution is also worse. Takes the load off your GPU, but makes the CPU work harder to run the game engine. So more FPS from the CPU might lead to faster overheating. Whereas with a higher resolution and the GPU running at max, the CPU would have idle time and stay cooler.

OS optimization could play a factor. They probably turned EVERYTHING off to get as clean a capture as possible.
I have a DeepCool Gammaxx 300 that I bought it less than a month ago.
Also, according to HWMonitor, my CPU don't get over 48 Celcius degrees under load (118 F).

My motherboard is an AsRock N68--GS4 fx R2.0 , does not allow overclock and I am not into it anyway.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, I'm pretty sure that DISABLING Cool N Quiet would not be indicative of a cooling issue, if it resolved the problem. I would think it would be the other way around if anything.

What are your FULL hardware specifications including motherboard, memory kit, EXACT power supply model number (Or series), etc.?
 

Third-Eye

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Jun 26, 2011
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I've gotta say that some of this advice is kind of terrible. In my 20 years of buildings and maintaining computers, updating the bios is pretty low on the priority list. You should really only update the bios when you have exhausted most or all other options you can think off or researched. I've seen too many people brick their boards on the advice of flashing the newest bios without doing any reseach on the various versions available for their board as well as a hardware failures during the flash process.

The FX-6300 and a GTX 750 TI can reach up to 60fps at low-medium settings at 1920x1080, but you are unlikely to maintain 60fps constant without lowering the resolution to below that. If you used 1366x768 you could probably increase graphics to medium settings and get 50-55fps.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
In my 20 years of buildings and maintaining computers, updating the bios is pretty low on the priority list.
Seriously? I won't even bother saying what I THINK about that comment, because it's blatantly uninformed. All I can think of is that your 20 years experience must have ended 10 years ago, because that's about when the advice about only updating the BIOS as a last resort was last a recommendable policy. These days, it's not only usually the FIRST thing that should be done, because manufacturers use BIOS updates much like driver updates USED to be used, but in some cases are absolutely essential for some newer hardware to even WORK with some architectures especially if a board has a very early BIOS version.

Not to mention, if you HAVE a Ryzen system with an early BIOS, and refused to update, then you'd MOST likely end up with a system that couldn't run any memory at speeds higher than 2400mhz, IF you were lucky to even get them to run with more than one stick at ANY speed or timings.

Manufacturers don't take a lot of time putting hardware through vigorous beta testing like they used to do in order to eliminate the majority of potential issues BEFORE they release it, and there is FAR more hardware out there that requires a BIOS update in order to resolve hardware level issues with motherboards that were released before that particular hardware was, than there used to be in the old days. Even though the FX platform is somewhat older, most of those motherboards are still UEFI models, not legacy BIOS.

I haven't seen anybody brick a board by updating the BIOS in YEARS, despite participating in 20 or more threads per week for the last 5 years straight where a BIOS update was performed. I think you are possibly stuck far in the past when it comes to modern hardware recommendations and troubleshooting.

Regardless of that angle however, I WILL agree that this is MORE likely by far to be a driver related issue if in fact ANY issue even exists other than simply having old and outdated hardware that was low end to begin with. There could be a number of differences between this system and the systems you are seeing ~10-15fps higher performance on such as different storage medium, different amount or speed of RAM, comparing to systems that are overclocked when yours is not, different model of GTX 750 TI with higher clocks or overclocked, even a different board can make the difference due to different or poor driver development or power delivery on that particular model.

Just a poorly maintained or very old Windows installation that is need of a clean install to clear out the cruft could account for that performance difference.
 
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sergiu.ciocan93

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Apr 26, 2018
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Yeah, I'm pretty sure that DISABLING Cool N Quiet would not be indicative of a cooling issue, if it resolved the problem. I would think it would be the other way around if anything.

What are your FULL hardware specifications including motherboard, memory kit, EXACT power supply model number (Or series), etc.?
Motherboard: AsRock N68-GS4 FX R2.0
CPU: FX 6300
GPU: GTX 750 Ti
PSU: Seasonic S12II-520 80+ Bronze, ATX12V, 520W
RAM: Klissre (a brand from China that I had no problem with) 8 GB DDR3 1600 Single Channel (I am waiting for another 8GB stick for dual channel)
CPU Cooler: DeepCool Gammaxx 300
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I read that as I disabled a feature that runs the fan slower and the computer stopped freezing as indicative of a cooling issue. If the temps look good, then it can be disregarded.

Does Cool & Quiet mess with the CPU voltage in any way?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Cool N Quiet has zero direct affect on fans. It is the same as Intel speedstep in that it reduces CPU frequency and voltage when there is no or light loads, if it does not need to be at the higher frequency and voltage. So yeah, it definitely has an effect on CPU voltage, but it has no direct relationship with fans other than because the CPU drops into a downclocked state with reduced voltage it reduces the core temperature which in turn would GENERALLY also reduce the fan speed of the CPU cooler and MAYBE the case fans, depending on how things are configured.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
RAM: Klissre (a brand from China that I had no problem with) 8 GB DDR3 1600 Single Channel (I am waiting for another 8GB stick for dual channel)
Brand isn't always particularly important in every case, although for quality it certainly CAN be, because there are only a few companies worldwide actually making the components used on these memory modules anyhow, but don't be too surprised if you discover at some point that the memory from China that you "had no problem with" suddenly becomes the memory that "I now have problems with" because the assembly and production practices of that cheap manufacturing process tell out over time.

The fact that you don't have 16GB, could be relevant compared to those other systems but more importantly the fact that you are running in single channel with half the bandwidth of most gaming systems is PROBABLY a factor to some degree or other when looking at why similarly equipped systems are doing significantly better. Also, don't be too surprised if you get that other stick and it doesn't want to play nice with the one that's installed now since they were not factory tested together. They certainly CAN work together, but there are no guarantees when memory is purchased separately. Ever.
 

sergiu.ciocan93

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Apr 26, 2018
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Brand isn't always particularly important in every case, although for quality it certainly CAN be, because there are only a few companies worldwide actually making the components used on these memory modules anyhow, but don't be too surprised if you discover at some point that the memory from China that you "had no problem with" suddenly becomes the memory that "I now have problems with" because the assembly and production practices of that cheap manufacturing process tell out over time.

The fact that you don't have 16GB, could be relevant compared to those other systems but more importantly the fact that you are running in single channel with half the bandwidth of most gaming systems is PROBABLY a factor to some degree or other when looking at why similarly equipped systems are doing significantly better. Also, don't be too surprised if you get that other stick and it doesn't want to play nice with the one that's installed now since they were not factory tested together. They certainly CAN work together, but there are no guarantees when memory is purchased separately. Ever.
Thank you for your response.

About the other RAM stick... I ordered exactly the same model as the one I already have.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's good, but it doesn't always matter. It is better to use the same part number because it increases the probability that they will work together when they didn't come together, but it is still not a guarantee. See this post for why that is.

Same part number, exactly. Three different configurations of memory components on the module. And that's a high end manufacturer, not a lower end budget Chinese company that is likely to throw whatever parts they have on hand into the box for use during any given production run.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/amd-ram-compatibility.3210050/#post-19785792
 

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