Build Advice Gaming PC Build (Any good?)

Jun 1, 2020
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Hello!
A few days ago i posted a Lumos build that i discovered i had done a terrible job of configuring. Using the suggestions there, i started over from scratch.
Primary use is gaming, wuth some streaming and video editing mixed in.
Budget is up to about $2700, although preferably a bit less. Ideally, would like to place the order by the end of the week.

Anyways, i think it's markedly better than my last attempt, but would truly appreciate any suggestions, or if there are any changes that i should make.

Build:

http://www.cybertronpc.com/c/WXln

https://www.cybertronpc.com/cart

Processor: AMD Ryzen™ 7 3800X 3.90GHz Octa-Core
Motherboard: ASUS TUF GAMING X570-PLUS Wi-FI
Memory: 2x Patriot Elite Viper
Graphics Card: NVIDIA® GeForce® RTX 2070 SUPER™ 8GB6
Operating System Storage: Samsung 512GB 970 PRO PCIe 3.0 NVMe M.2
CPU Liquid Cooling: CLX Quench 240 Closed Liquid Cooler
Secondary Storage: Seagate 1TB 2.5in SATA3 BarraCuda SSD
Chassis Selection: Gamdias Talos P1 Mid-Tower Black
Chassis Fans: 4x Standard 120mm Case Fans
Power Supply: 750 Watt GAMDIAS Kratos M1
Price: $2,113
 
Jun 3, 2020
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I would switch out the RAM for 2 x 8 gb 3200 Mhz (at least) sticks. Two 16 gb sticks of RAM is a bit overkill imo.

And I second on choosing a better quality PSU. I would go for either the EVGA or Thermaltake modular PSUs they have listed. Make sure it's at least 80+ bronze.

Everyone else looks fine for the most part from what I'm seeing.
 
Reactions: cranky_messiah
Jun 1, 2020
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I'd choose a better quality PSU.

The 3800X doesn't justify the extra cost over a 3700X IMO. (unless the price difference is small or zero)

Are you not comfortable assembling parts yourself?
Unfortunately, i am not.
Think the 3700 was about $80-$100 cheaper? I will have to double check.
EDIT: i wasnt even close. There is only a $12 difference between 3700x and 3800.
 
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Jun 1, 2020
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I would switch out the RAM for 2 x 8 gb 3200 Mhz (at least) sticks. Two 16 gb sticks of RAM is a bit overkill imo.

And I second on choosing a better quality PSU. I would go for either the EVGA or Thermaltake modular PSUs they have listed. Make sure it's at least 80+ bronze.

Everyone else looks fine for the most part from what I'm seeing.
Awesome, thanks!
Out of curiosity, what is wrong with the PSU? For future reference...
 
Jun 3, 2020
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Awesome, thanks!
Out of curiosity, what is wrong with the PSU? For future reference...
I just personally would go for a brand I'm more comfortable with and I know that has quality products. This PSU is 80+ bronze certified which is good but isn't modular which isn't a HUGE deal considering you won't be building the rig yourself but it's good, in my experience, to have a fully modular or at least a semi modular PSU at your disposal down the line in case you ever get that itch to build a PC yourself or need to switch out something.

It just gives you more head room and compatibility for the future.
 
Reactions: cranky_messiah

QwerkyPengwen

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ok. here's a build for just about $2K

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X63 98.17 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($149.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($178.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Sabrent Rocket Q 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($129.97 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB KO GAMING Video Card ($709.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Thermaltake Toughpower Grand RGB 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.99 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1967.38
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-03 21:51 EDT-0400



And if you wanted to maximize the $2700, you could get this instead


PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor ($415.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X72 Liquid CPU Cooler ($169.99 @ NZXT)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($178.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Sabrent Rocket Q 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($129.97 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB Black Video Card ($1206.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Thermaltake Toughpower Grand RGB 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($129.99 @ Best Buy)
Total: $2624.88
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-03 21:50 EDT-0400



However, if you don't already have a decent monitor for gaming, and peripherals, then I would go with the first build, and put the extra money of the budget towards those things.
 
Reactions: cranky_messiah

QwerkyPengwen

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And to clarify on some things in my buids.
The Meshify S2 is plenty well sized enough for any component to fit inside, and with the front mesh panel you get fantastic aiflow.
It also comes with 3x140mm fans installed, one at the rear, and two at the front.
It supports up to a 360mm radiator at the top, or a 280mm at the top or the front, so no need for additional fans as the AiO's chosen, along with the pre installed fans will fill all your fan spots.

Despite what you might think about Thermaltake, their higher end PSU's are high quality, and so you don't need to worry about it.

And not once did I ever choose a component based on it having RGB, it just happens that when you get into the higher tier bracket of components you just get it by default. I chose all components based on reputation, quality, performance, and price.

The 3700x while it has a lower base clock TDP, once you start overclocking it it won't matter, and can perform virtually the same as the 3800x, but for less money.

I then chose the RAM based on your needs and based on performance with Ryzen.
I chose 32GB because you mentioned video editing, which can get RAM hungry.
And I chose 3600MHz with a lower CAS latency for improved performance from the CPU.

Obviously I opted for larger NVME storage for main OS, apps, and for having room to video edit off of along with specific games that see worth while improvements from running them off an SSD, and the 2TB HDD is for all the other games and files and such. It is 7200 RPM with a 256MB cache for an unbeatable price.

I stuck with the same motherboard you chose simply because it's a quality motherboard with a fantastic BIOS (Asus has great BIOS on their boards), and it has all the features and support for the things you are going to slap onto it.

And then naturally I chose a higher tier graphics card because the budget allowed for it, and went with a quality brand that I use and trust and know that the cooling on, as well as the performance on, is good (especially when overclocking)

The AiO I chose was based on the same principle of quality and performance.

I hope this all helps. Cheers.
 
Reactions: cranky_messiah

GarrettL

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Where in the US? Do you have a Micro Center near you?

I'm running the same build you are looking at, but I have 16GB of RAM and that has been more than enough.

And trying to find a good quality PSU for a fair price is tough right now. I'm running a Seasonic Focus gold 650 watt.

The NVMe slots are golden imo. I'm running two 1TB NVME drives and would suggest upgrading to a 1TB if you can. You'll get hooked on them.

Great pc build sir, you'll love it.
 
Reactions: cranky_messiah
Jun 1, 2020
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Where in the US? Do you have a Micro Center near you?

I'm running the same build you are looking at, but I have 16GB of RAM and that has been more than enough.

And trying to find a good quality PSU for a fair price is tough right now. I'm running a Seasonic Focus gold 650 watt.

The NVMe slots are golden imo. I'm running two 1TB NVME drives and would suggest upgrading to a 1TB if you can. You'll get hooked on them.

Great pc build sir, you'll love it.
Awesome! Thanks for the advice! I have taken your suggestion and upgraded to the 1TB NVME, and downgraded to 16gb RAM.
What size PSU would you recommend? The 650 is fine? The PSU is what killed my last PC, so now i'm paranoid...
Unfortunately, i do not know of any Micro Centers in the area. Ive actually never even heard of it, to be honest. I live in the boonies of Ohio.

Sincere thanks for the advice, suggestions, and encouragement!
 
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I hope this all helps. Cheers.
Unforunately, i am not comfortable trying to build it on my own. That being said, that was a lot of very helpful information that helped me reconsider some things and look at some of the components differently, and i will store away the rest for future reference. I sincerely appreciate you going above and beyond in providing helpful information!
 

QwerkyPengwen

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I'm sorry, but this Cybertron PC place is ripping you off big time.

Here's the exact same build more or less from your original post, but using PCPP.

You can see that they are charging a huge amount of money more in markup.

You'd be better off literally building it yourself. Not complicated. Not technical. Not hard. Plenty of YouTube videos that explain what you're doing.
But you could also buy the parts, then pay somebody on Craigslist to put it together for you for a small fee and maybe watch them and have them teach you a few things. Plenty of them lying around.

But if you want to do with the system integrator, then by all means, do what you gotta.
This has just been my opinion since I don't like wasting money or getting ripped off and don't like it for others.

Retail price of build using PCPP is about $1700
And this place wants over $2000.
I had to make up numbers for the power supply and case since they weren't available to buy online, but I guarantee you they wouldn't cost more than what I valued them at, especially for this company that get's these things in bulk and on discount.

Even if we get generous and tack on an additional $50 for the case and PSU for a total of an additional $100 making it $1800, they still want $2100 for the PC, which means they are charging you an additional $300 for combined build fee/tech support/warranty handling, and markup on the parts themselves, because again, they get these parts cheaper than you would because you would have to pay retail and they wouldn't, meaning that the PC itself costs them personally less than the $1700 I came up with using PCPP, which means they are charging you more than $300 additional.
I would estimate the build costs them at least $200 less meaning they are charging probably at least $500 additional on top of the cost of the build.

Which is a rip off.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 3.9 GHz 8-Core Processor ($328.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: Patriot Viper Elite 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-2666 CL16 Memory ($124.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 970 Pro 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 120 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($116.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Best Buy)
Case: GAMDIAS Talos P1 ATX Mid Tower Case ($100.00)
Power Supply: GAMDIAS KRATOS M1 B 750 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($100.00)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($109.99 @ B&H)
Total: $1720.92
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-04 15:39 EDT-0400
 
Jun 1, 2020
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He already moved on to a build thread.
Well, i actually got delayed on this... car broke down on Tuesday and wanted to see how much repairs were before ordering this! But i'm in the clear.

Anyways, placing the order today, but wanted to check a couple of things real quick first:
-Shouldnt i upgrade my system memory to 3200mhz?
-Should i change my secondary storage from SSD to an NVME?
-Least importantly, is there really much reason to upgrade the sound card and ethernet from the stock options? Or should i be fine with those?
 

GarrettL

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You want 3200 at a minimum.

The onboard sound is good, not audiophile quality if that’s what your looking for. But it’s good.

You only get PCIe 4.0 speeds on the NVME drive closest to the cpu. It does not have a heat sink on this slot. Check to see if the NVME you are using requires one or comes with it. The Sabrent’s don’t always come with one.
Only the lower slot comes with a heat sink as part of the motherboard assembly. And this slot runs through the chipset, don’t put a 4.0 drive here, waste of money. You don’t get 4.0 speeds in this slot, so a good SSD or 3.0 NVMe will perform almost the same.
 
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QwerkyPengwen

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Hmm. For the system memory, is it worth the extra $150 to go from a 1TB Samsung EVO Plus, to a 1TB 970 Samsung Pro (both being NVME)?
That's entirely up to you.
Once you drop yourself into the Samsung to begin with you are no longer in the realm of practical or logical.
You are in the realm of "oh look, it has 1 digit higher number in potential speed..... Imma get it cuz why not" regardless of the price because all you care about at this point is having what is, on paper, the best of the best. So asking others if it's worth spending even more money on is pointless. You can only ask yourself that question and answer it as well.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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That's entirely up to you.
Once you drop yourself into the Samsung to begin with you are no longer in the realm of practical or logical.
You are in the realm of "oh look, it has 1 digit higher number in potential speed..... Imma get it cuz why not" regardless of the price because all you care about at this point is having what is, on paper, the best of the best. So asking others if it's worth spending even more money on is pointless. You can only ask yourself that question and answer it as well.
I wasnt aware what the actual difference was, to be honest. Someone recommended it, but i couldnt actually see any difference justifying the extra money. You just confirmed my suspicions that it is not worth it.
Not clear what you mean by Samsung in general, though... I'm assuming a 1TB Corsair or Seagate nvme is just as good?

Thanks!
 

QwerkyPengwen

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The crucial p1, sabrent rocket q, or the Intel 660p are totally fine for the normal user that just wants to game, do normal pc tasks, and even some video editing but they cost about $100. Paying $200 for samsung is for those who are either going to capitalize on the potential of the SSD's performance, or want it just because they have the money to burn and want the higher tier product.

It's like when people buy a high end 2080 Ti for $1300. They don't usually buy it because they NEED it's performance capabilities for anything important, they buy it because they have the money to burn for it and simply want the best available.

But other people here might have a difference in opinion on that so.... * Shrug *
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
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I ended up reversing course at the last minute and getting a Corsair 680x with these same components. I couldnt find a case that i liked on that site; the one i had chosen had terrible reviews, and the rest either had subpar reviews or were just plain ugly.
 

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