Question GeForce GT 710 Card - monitor 1 of 2 keeps flickering?

Event2020

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Feb 7, 2017
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My System is a dedicated music DAW.
Asus American Megatrends 1905 BIOS
Asus P8H77-V Motherboard
32 gig fast RAM
Windows 7 64 bit (kept updated with all latest appropriate drivers and updates)
3 Samsung Evo Hard Drives
Duel Monitor Display 2xHP w1907v
1 Monitor in to the Grapics Card VGA Port and the other into the DVI-D port via a DVI-D to VGA Adapter.


The windows install has been slim lined taking out bloat ware and system services not needed for audio production and has been stable as a rock and extremely fast.

I have just purchased and installed a ASUS Nvidia GeForce GT 710 Graphics card and I only installed the Graphics Card driver and the HD Audio Driver. I did not need nor want the 3D stuff as I will not use it and it could cause conflicts with my resource hungry soft synths and so on.

Since installing the card the primary monitor (the software sees it as Monitor 1) flickers on and off and when I say flicker I mean the video feed to the monitor and not the mains power.
The feed will be fine for 10 - 15 seconds then will go to black for a second before coming back. In another 30 seconds it happens again, maybe 10 seconds it happens again and so on.
This happens only to the primary monitor (Monitor 1) and Monitor 2 performs perfectly.

This is what I have tried to cure it.
Spoke by web chat to Asus tech support - utterly useless and they admit they have little tech training beyond trying a couple of quick fixes none of which worked. At the tech supports suggestion, I tried moving the GT 710 to my only other PCI slot but it made no difference - the tech support then simply said return it to the place of purchase.

Swapped the video cables around so that Monitor 1's now went to Monitor 2 - no difference

Swapped the cables at the back of the card so the one that was in the VGA port was now in the adapter on the DVI port and the other was now in the VGA - No difference.

Removed the GT 710 from my computer and uninstalled all GeForce software and drivers that came on the install CD.
Plugged each monitor in turn in to the Motherboards own VGA port to test it was not a monitor or cable issue and ran a couple of CPU intensive programs - both monitors performed perfectly.

Downloaded the latest driver set I can find for the GT 710 (431.60-desktop-win8-win7-64bit-international-whql.zip) and performed a clean install for just the Graphics Card driver and the HD Audio only - no difference the issue still happens.

I do not know what else to do - to me this seems like a driver issue but I may be wrong.

The last time I had computer issues, many years ago and several computers back, the issue was caused by bad driver programming and clashing IRQ's.

Does anyone have any suggestions?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Samsung does not make EVO hard drives. They make EVO solid state drives, SSDs. That's an important distinction. Yes, it's semantics, kind of, but still somewhat important to accurately describe.

Try doing a clean install using ONLY this driver, and use the Display driver uninstaller FIRST. (The 431.60 drivers you used are NOT the latest Windows 7 64bit drivers for that card. Up to date driver package is 436.3)

https://www.geforce.com/drivers/results/151273


Also, I would check to see if there are any newer BIOS firmware versions for your motherboard and if there are, update. It would probably be an equally good idea to check your motherboard's product page to see if there are any updated drivers for LAN/Ethernet adapter, audio and chipset. Do not rely on the Windows supplied native drivers even if it looks like there are no problems with those drivers. Use the ASUS supplied drivers from the motherboard product page.
 

Event2020

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Hi Darkbreeze



Thank you for your reply and help.



I downloaded the driver pack you suggested and performed a clean install of the Graphics Display driver only, no HD audio or 3d stuff, and I do not install the GeForce experience either. On a Music DAW you want as little non music apps as possible.



I am sad to say it made no difference and the issue is still happening.



I should had clarified when I said win 7 is kept updated - what I should have said is all system drivers are kept updated from ASUS and so on. I do not allow windows update to run plus the PC is not even connected to the net.
 

Event2020

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My PSU is a OCZ ZS Series 750w

The retailer is TGC Computers

I think you are right about returning it which sux

I do not suppose it could be a motherboard problem could it?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, it definitely COULD be. Did you have another, different graphics card, prior to getting this one? IF you did, was that one not working as well?

How old is that ZS series PSU, because from what I'm seeing that unit is likely around 8 years old. That's an awfully long run for a power supply that was VERY mediocre to begin with. Especially one with rather poor voltage regulation and ripple suppression from the start. I'd highly recommend that no matter what else you do, you seriously consider a replacement unit, and get a good one this time. And by good, I don't just mean lots of watts on paper. Something with seriously substantial quality. For your purposes, you might actually want to REALLY, REALLY consider paying the extra for a unit with passive operation that largely will never require the fan to come on and that has terrific electrical noise properties since it seems sound and audio are your primary use case for this machine and a low quality power supply can introduce all sorts of audio artifacts and hum as well as other problems such as ground loop noises as well.

Aside from the general recommendations in the spoiler below, I can make a specific recommendation if you like on a unit that I think would be well suited for your purposes. Just for reference, here are the low points in the original reviews done for your current model.

  • At this price it faces really strong competition from units that utilize modern designs/components (e.g. DC-DC converters)
  • Mediocre ripple suppression at +12V and 5VSB
  • +12V registered a very high voltage drop in the third part of Turn on Transient Tests (PSU off to full +12V)
  • Main ATX cable is a little short and may cause compatibility problems in large cases
  • Distance among the peripheral and SATA connectors is too short (85 mm)
  • Wires among the peripheral and SATA connectors are not sleeved
Let's start with the biggest misconception out there, which is that if a unit has high watts it will be ok or is good. Well, that couldn't be further from the truth.

There are plenty of 750-1000w units out there that I wouldn't trust to power a string of LED lights and might in fact be a much worse choice than a unit with a significantly lower listed capacity.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, how many watts or amps it says it can support is irrelevant.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it is a PSU platform that we already know is good anyhow. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, whether or not it has an 80plus certification is irrelevant.

Whatever you do, don't EVER buy a power supply based on whether it has RGB or lighting, or looks like it might be a quality unit. Some of the biggest hunks of junk out there look just as good as a Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium, but I assure you, they are not. So far there are very few very good units out there that have RGB built in. Maybe one or two models, but rest assured you'll be be paying for the lighting, not for the quality of the power supply.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Seasonic. Seasonic isn't just a brand, they are a PSU manufacturer, unlike many of the PSU brands you see they make their own power supply platforms AND a great many of the very good PSU models out there from other brands like Antec, Corsair and older XFX are made by Seasonic.

Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions.

Most common currently, in order of preference, would be the Seasonic Focus series, then Focus plus, then Prime, then Prime ultra. It's worth mentioning that there are generally Gold, Platinum and Titanium versions within each, or most, of those series, but that does not necessarily mean that a Focus plus Platinum is necessarily better than a Prime Gold. It only means that it scored better in the 80plus efficiency testing, not that the platform is better.

Again, don't let yourself get tangled up in the idea that a higher 80plus rating specifically means that it is a better unit than another one with a lower rating, unless you know that it is a good platform from the start. All these Focus and Prime units are pretty good so you can somewhat focus on the 80plus rating when deciding which of them to choose.

Super Flower. Super Flower is another PSU manufacturer. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.They also make most of the good units sold by EVGA like the G2, G3, P2 and T2 models.

Super Flower doesn't have a very broad availability for the units with their own brand name on them, and are not available in a lot of countries but for those where there is availability you want to look at the Leadex and Leadex II models. The Golden green platform is fairly decent too but is getting rather long in the tooth as a platform AND I've seen some reviews indicating a few shortcomings on units based on this platform.

Even so, it's a great deal better than a lot of other platforms out there so you could certainly do worse than a Golden green model. Units based on the Leadex and Leadex II platforms are much better though.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, but still not what we'd call terrific, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, RM, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles. I'd only choose this model if it is on sale or the aesthetics match up with your color scheme or design. Still a good power supply but maybe a little aggressive on the fan profile. This may have been cured on newer Edge models so reading professional tear down reviews is still the best idea.

Antec Earthwatts Gold units are very good also.

BeQuiet. BeQuiet does have a few decent models, BUT, you must be VERY selective about which of their models you put your trust in. From model to model their are huge differences in both quality and performance, even with the same series. If you cannot find a review for a BeQuiet unit on HardOCP, JonnyGuru or Tom's hardware that SPECIFICALLY says it is a very good unit, and does not have any significant issues in the "cons" category, I would avoid it. In fact, I'd probably avoid it anyhow unless there is a very great sale on one that has good reviews, because their units are generally more expensive than MUCH better units from Antec, Seasonic, EVGA and Corsair.

EVGA. They have BOTH good and not very good models.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most models failed testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models.

Good models are the B2, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master.

They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

This is just ONE example of why I say that. Very new and modern CM unit. One of the worst scores ever seen on JonnyGuru for a well known brand name product. Doesn't look to be much better than a Raidmax unit. Sad.

Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 600W review

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

Power supply discussion thread

The Powerspec units sold my Microcenter are a mixed bag. Some of them are fairly decent using the same platform as the Sirfa High power astro lite platform, so not total dumpster fire type units, but not particularly good either, and some of their units are simply garbage and should be listed below in the DO NOT USE category, but I'm leaving them out because there are really no reviews of them and since there are a few units from them that are ok-ish, I'm giving them a "use at your own discretion but buy a better model if you can" grade.

A gray label CX or CXm unit would probably be an upgrade from one of those Powerspec models, without any doubt.

Certainly there ARE some good units out there that you won't see above among those I've listed, but they are few and far between, much as a hidden nugget of gold you find in a crevice among otherwise ordinary rocks and don't EVER assume a unit is good just because of the brand.

If you cannot find an IN DEPTH, REPUTABLE review on Tom's hardware, JonnyGuru, HardOCP, Hardware secrets (Old reviews by Gabe Torres), Kitguru (Only Aris reviews), TechPowerUP, SilentPC crew or a similar site that does much more than simply a review of the unboxing and basic tests that don't include reliable results for ripple, noise, voltage regulation and a complete teardown of the unit including identification of the internal platform, then the unit is a big fat question mark.

I recommend not trusting such units as companies generally always send out review samples of any unit they feel is going to get a good review, and don't send them out if they know they are going to get hammered by the reviewer. No review usually equals poor quality. Usually.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

Acbell, A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.
 

Third-Eye

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The GT 710 is so low power that even a "garbage" PSU would be fine running it. It draws it's power from the PCIE slot. Th OPs system has been running fine, so If 19watts additional power draw is not too much for it to handle, it has to be the video card itself that is faulty and should be returned for a replacement.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The concern with the PSU is far and away not related to capacity concerns, and nobody voiced that it was, so I'm not sure what your comment is in reference to.

The PSU recommendation is for other concerns, although the fact remains that ANY number of issues with a power supply could be a problem. That particular model had major problems with the transient response times, resulting in a major voltage drop, which if bad enough could likely result in a failure to initiate at all due to the level of voltage drop. While that is probably not the case, it reasonably could be relevant, even with a low powered graphics card, especially if that unit has degraded to the point where it is only capable of supplying a fraction of it's original capacity and after 8 years of use that's not only possible but likely.

And, a "garbage" PSU is never ok. For ANY system. Ever. If by garbage, you mean an OEM unit, those are usually not garbage, just low capacity, for prebuilt systems like Dell, HP and Lenovo, but I'd agree that many of the other prebuilt companies out there definitely DO use a wide assortment of garbage power supplies. And my advice then, would be to take them out and throw them in the trash even if you're using integrated graphics.

It certainly does not HAVE to be the card that is bad. Any number of things could be at fault including the motherboard. Still, I'd agree that the graphics card is the number one suspect but I'd want to know more about the history of this configuration before committing to that. Such as, whether there was previously a card installed that quit working or any attempts to use a different card that failed. The fact that the integrated graphics work makes it LESS likely there is a problem with the motherboard but it certainly doesn't eliminate the possibility.

If the CPU has been out of the build at some point, or if a discreet card has never before been used, it's even remotely possible that there is a bent pin on the CPU somewhere that is preventing the discreet graphics PCI circuit from working normally. Lots of possible reasons.

The fact that this card was bought through TGC computers, somebody I've never heard of, makes me a lot more suspicious of the condition of the card though. I'd definitely recommend returning the card and trying a different card. At least then we'd know if the problem WAS for sure the card, or if not, we'd eliminate that possibility so we can look at other potential issues.
 
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Event2020

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Hi everyone and thank you for your replys.

I have spent the day trying various things but the issue still remains.

I have now tried a total of three different Graphic Cards, 3 different graphic cards now, ASUS HD 5450 Silent, ASUS GeForce GT 710 and a ASUS Radeon R7 240, and they made no difference with the flickering happening regardless. The ASUS GeForce GT 710 and ASUS Radeon R7 240 are both brand new.

To address the ASUS GeForce GT 710 purchase from TGC computers, they are a fairly big outfit and the box was still sealed with what looks to me like the original security seal (but I suppose there may be a way to fake that but is it worth it on a £38 card?).

The ASUS Radeon R7 240 came direct from Amazon who are selling it themselves (and not for-filled on behalf of a 3rd party seller).

The ASUS HD 5450 Silent is the original card that I installed when I built the system 7 or 8 years ago and it has performed perfectly until a couple of days ago when this flickering issue started.

Also this afternoon using a spare SSD I did a clean install of Windows 7 64 bit and the issue was still there. I then performed all of the graphic card swapping and cable tests/swapping as I outlined in my previous post and again the issue was still there.

EXCEPT....
I only discovered this today - If I hard boot the machine (not a reboot but a power off) with only one monitor then there is no issue. Regardless of whether I use the VGA port or the DVI and no matter which cable I use the flickering is gone. If I then turn the computer off and reattach the 2nd monitor, upon booting the flickering returns on Monitor 1. It is worth clarifying that it does not matter which monitor I use, as long as there is only one attached to the computer then there is no flickering.

I have tested this on all three cards and the results are the same.

I am no expert at all but I do wonder if there is anything on the Motherboard that can be causing this now. There must be a control set or driver (I may be talking rubbish) that regulates or controls the video signal from the CPU? and then sends it to the PCI slots?

I don't know - maybe not but it seems strange that the same results are found for all thee Graphics cards...
 

Event2020

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Quick update.

Not sure if the issue is getting worse or I have just stumbled across this.

When I only have one monitor installed (as the primary) if I open Screen Resolution and increase it to a high - middle ground setting (it is one I normally use) it starts flickering and the higher I set the resolution the worse the flickering gets.....
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Let me invite somebody in who is probably a bit more knowledgeable with monitor and display issues. Aside from the PSU other motherboard which seem to be the only common denominators, I'm not sure what the issue could be to be honest. I'm assuming you ARE using the outputs on the graphics card only yes?

Also, I don't notice that you've ever mentioned what CPU you are using?
 

Event2020

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Hi Darkbreeze

First allow me to say thank you for your help thus far, I really do appreciate it and I would welcome any suggestions from the other forum member you mention.

My CPU is a Intel Core i5-3550.

I do not run it over clocked and, unless it turns out that it is this that is causing this issue, it has performed flawlessly. My computer handles 24 tracks plus of stereo audio at 96Hz 32 bit floating point with out breaking a sweat although if I load up lots of plugins and FX on each channel it can cause issues but it is rare I do that.

I do hope that it is not a CPU issue (said with nerves) :cautious:
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My intention was not that you should need to replace the CPU, only to know whether or not it has integrated graphics. Which it does.

So again I'll ask, we are talking about both monitors being connected to the graphics card when this happens, and neither of them connected to the motherboard video output from the CPU correct?

Have you TRIED connecting the second monitor to the CPU integrated graphics from the motherboard to see if the problem persists? You may need to make a configuration change in the BIOS in order to use both discreet and integrated graphics, but there is no reason you shouldn't be able to do so at least as a troubleshooting tool and maybe as a permanent or temporary solution if it works.

I think we are coming around to the point where we have to start thinking that yes, this might be a motherboard issue. Replacing the motherboard is probably not a viable option either as those LGA 1155 boards are hard to come by now and expensive when you do find one, if it's worth having. A lot of them, even new old stock units, are risky as well because after all these years there is high risk of capacitor degradation even on units that have never been run. I would certainly not advise purchasing any used motherboard from that generation, that's a waste of money plain and simple.

If the motherboard turns out to be bad, it would likely be a much better, although more expensive, decision to simply upgrade the whole platform.
 

Event2020

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I apologise if I missed you asking about this but I will elaborate:

The flickering happens when the monitors are connected to any one of the three graphic cards I now own and NOT to the Motherboards ports.

I did mention it in my original post but as part of my testing I plugged each monitor in turn in to the Motherboards own VGA port to test it was not a monitor or cable issue and ran a couple of CPU intensive programs - both monitors performed perfectly.

However using the MB's ports I am unable to expand the desktop from one across to the other and it causes terrible lag within my music software and during playback of audio to the point of being unusable.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That shouldn't happen. Do you have the latest drivers installed for your integrated graphics IN ADDITION to the drivers for your graphics card?

Also, I would try doing a clean install again, of the drivers for your graphics card, and DON'T hold back on any of the optional features such as the audio or 3d. Sometimes some of the driver features are required for other parts to work correctly, even if we think they wouldn't be. Worth a try anyhow.
 

Event2020

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I know I updated the LAN and Chipset drivers from the ASUS download page for my Motherboard while trying to cure this issue.


I do not remember if I have updated the VGA drivers which is shown on that web-page as:
Intel Graphics Accelerator Driver V9.17.10.2884 for Windows Win7 64bit & Win8 64bit---(WHQL).

I am downloading as I type this and will install them anyway and report back.
I will also do a clean install of the Graphic Card drivers as you suggest and I will allow
all options/drivers to install - at this stage it is worth trying anything.

There are also USB & SATA drivers on the website and I can not remember if I have installed
the last available updated set but it is the kind of thing I would do as a matter of course.

I will mention, in case it matters, I do not use the MB's on-board audio, I have a separate
pro sound card which has never given any issues.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that is understandable however the drivers for all onboard hardware SHOULD be installed regardless. The drivers for your sound card are for the operation of that device only, and drivers for them will be installed regardless of whether they are the correct, intended drivers, or some other generic driver that Windows decides to use in lieu of the correct drivers being installed. That alone can cause problems with other hardware. It is always a good idea to install all drivers for your motherboard, as outlined on the product page, unless you know there are better or newer drivers available through the hardware manufacturer (Realtek for example, in the case of audio, etc.) or getting the chipset drivers directly from either AMD or Intel.
 

Event2020

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I used the NVIDIA GT 710 for this as it is newer than the original HD 5450 and in the install app I chose "Clean Install" and installed all options.

It all seemed to install ok but when it tried to launch the NVIDIA GeForce Experience app it gave the following error:

"NVIDIA GeForce Experience
Something went wrong
Try rebooting your PC and then launch GeForce Experience
ERROR CODE: 0x0003"

I rebooted and tried to launch the GeForce Experience app but got the same error message.

I also tried to install the VGA driver/s from the ASUS web-page and I received the following error message.

"This computer does not meet the minimum requirements for installing the software"

I do not understand this as it is the software for their VGA on their motherboard - oh well

Either way none of this has cured the issue, the video still flickers.

As far as the on board sound goes, I have it disabled in the BIOS as this is the recommended setting from my main music software creator. I am not saying it could or could not be the issue rather it has been set this way for 7 or 8 years without any issues.

As I understand it, the thinking behind this (and turning off any system services that are not needed) is that every little service or driver can potentially place a load or make a call on the CPU causing spikes or glitches. A lot of software synths are very resource heavy so every little thing counts and this kind of paring down is still carried out on modern music PC's.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, I'm sorry. I should have said "except for GeForce experience", since you are not gaming and the only need for that is for gaming. Try the clean install again, unselect the GeForce experience option. That's not used for Nvidia settings anyhow. The Nvidia control panel is used for settings.

Disabling the onboard sound is different than not having the drivers for it installed. Windows is going to use drivers for that device, to reserve it's use in the event that you choose to enable it at some point, whether you like it or not. So you can disable it, that's fine, but you still want the most current drivers for it installed and THEN disable it.
 

Event2020

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Ah I understand what you mean about the on board sound driver in which case, yes it would have been installed by windows as I only disabled it within the BIOS once I had Windows up and running.

I will try the clean install of the Nvidia now (minus the GeForce Experience)
 

Event2020

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Something that did happen is if I right click the desktop on Monitor 1 while it is flashing and select Screen Resolution, it shows the correct monitor driver and the recommended resolution, when the signal flickers again (while the screen resolution box is open) it reverts to generic monitor and lowest setting windows allows, then it will flicker again and show the correct monitor and resolution, then flicker again back to the generic and so on...
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, the person I asked to chime in on this said that he doesn't see much we haven't covered already. I'm sorry man, but short of it being an issue with the quality or type of cables being used, or a problem with the motherboard, I'm at a loss. I'll try to find some additional input though because maybe I'm missing something obvious.

Personally I think I'd try a new PSU first. It's possible that your PSU is simply right on the edge of still being able to support a single display and even though these are very low powered graphics cards, driving an additional output might just be enough to amplify whatever issue the unit is having enough to become apparent. It's the only other thing that I can think of short of it being a motherboard or driver issue.
 

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