News GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 Encoders May Vary: Check the Specs

watzupken

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Mar 16, 2020
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Graphic card manufacturers will likely not want to be clear which GTX 1650 will have updated/ better encoder. In doing so, who will then buy the TU117 version with the outdated encoder?
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Graphic card manufacturers will likely not want to be clear which GTX 1650 will have updated/ better encoder. In doing so, who will then buy the TU117 version with the outdated encoder?
Three words: Class Action Lawsuit.

If you aren't clear about what you are selling people and people end up with goods not fit for the intended purpose because you failed to list a materially significant difference between product variants, you are asking for trouble.
 
Three words: Class Action Lawsuit.

If you aren't clear about what you are selling people and people end up with goods not fit for the intended purpose because you failed to list a materially significant difference between product variants, you are asking for trouble.
That would probably be a bit of a stretch considering they are offering an improved encoder with this revision. That's pretty much the opposite of a bait and switch. Lots of products see improved revisions over time, and it's not like the existing cards are being advertised as having the better hardware. Anyone making a lawsuit would likely be much better off focusing on products that have clearly been downgraded from the original version. And if anyone cared about performance that much, they should probably just pay $10 or so more for a 1650 SUPER. : P
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
That would probably be a bit of a stretch considering they are offering an improved encoder with this revision.
Which revision are you talking about? The article warns that TU117 now exists in both GDDR5 and GDDR6 flavors so "GDDR6" cannot be used as a reliable indicator of getting a TU106/116 GTX1650 anymore, hence the risk of getting less than you thought you were.
 
Which revision are you talking about? The article warns that TU117 now exists in both GDDR5 and GDDR6 flavors so "GDDR6" cannot be used as a reliable indicator of getting a TU106/116 GTX1650 anymore, hence the risk of getting less than you thought you were.
The original GTX 1650 (and the 1660) used GDDR5 from the start though, with the GDDR6 versions of the 1650 only appearing in recent months. And those tend to be a bit faster than the original version overall, so again, an upgrade rather than a downgrade. It's just that you can't clearly tell whether a card has the better video encoder or not based on the memory type alone, since some GDDR6 cards are using 1650 silicon, while others are using cut-down versions of higher-end chips. I guess the better encoder could be thought of more as a bonus for those cut-down cards, rather than something the others are missing, unless they were specifically being advertised as having it.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
I guess the better encoder could be thought of more as a bonus for those cut-down cards, rather than something the others are missing, unless they were specifically being advertised as having it.
If you sell multiple variants of a thing with a materially significant differences such as missing feature, you do open yourself up for liabilities for failing to disclose materially significant differences when people eventually discover that a feature that they could have reasonably expected to have due to other similar products having it actually isn't there.

People have expectations of how HDDs should perform, HDD manufacturers tried foisting SMR units on the market without marking them as such, now they are facing class actions for failing to distinctively mark those drives to let people know what's up.

You can add features and improve performance without telling people about them but once the expectation of those features and performance being available is out there, quietly rolling them back is legally risky.
 
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