Question Genuinely stumped, need immediate help

valaniftbuisness

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Dec 18, 2017
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I have been fiddling with my computer for the past 5 hours. Nothing will display on my monitors, I tried changing out the PSU, moving the graphics card to a different spot, unplugging everything and plugging it back in and nothing will work. Please, if anyone has any idea on what's going on is appreciate it. ( and before you say, yes the monitors work, they display my Xbox just fine.)
 

valaniftbuisness

Prominent
Dec 18, 2017
14
1
525
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specs are
Intel Core i5 8600K
Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060
16 GB DDR4 Ram
1200W Rosewell 80 Gold Plus PSU
1 TB (I think Western digital) HDD

Problem started a few hours ago. added a new cpu fan and replaced 500w PSU with 1200 W PSU. computer was working fine before that, now I don't get any display.
 
also how would I go about resetting the bios?
The easiest way to clear the CMOS is to enter the BIOS setup utility and choose Reset BIOS Settings to their factory default levels.

The exact menu option in your particular motherboard's BIOS may differ but look for phrases like reset to default, factory default, clear BIOS, load setup defaults, etc. Every manufacturer seems to have their own way of wording it. The BIOS Settings option is usually located near the bottom of the screen, or at the end of your BIOS options, depending on how it's structured. If you're having trouble finding it, look close to where the Save or Save & Exit options are because they're usually around those.

Another way to clear CMOS is to reseat the CMOS battery. Start by making sure your computer is unplugged. Next, open up your computer's case if you're using a desktop PC, or find and open the small CMOS battery panel if you're using a tablet or laptop computer.

Finally, remove the CMOS battery for a few minutes and then put it back in. Close the case or battery panel and then plug in, or reattach the computer's main battery. By disconnecting and then reconnecting the CMOS battery, you remove the source of power that saves your computer's BIOS settings, resetting them to default.

Another way to clear the CMOS is to short the CLEAR CMOS jumper on your motherboard, assuming your motherboard has one. Make sure your computer is unplugged and then open it up. Look around your motherboard's surface for a jumper with the CLEAR CMOS label, which will be located on the motherboard and near the jumper. These jumpers are often located near the BIOS chip itself or next to the CMOS battery. Some other names by which you might see this jumper labeled include CLRPWD, PASSWORD, or even just CLEAR.

Do all these things VERY carefully, if you are not comfortable, then ask someone else for help, if need be.
 

valaniftbuisness

Prominent
Dec 18, 2017
14
1
525
1
The easiest way to clear the CMOS is to enter the BIOS setup utility and choose Reset BIOS Settings to their factory default levels.

The exact menu option in your particular motherboard's BIOS may differ but look for phrases like reset to default, factory default, clear BIOS, load setup defaults, etc. Every manufacturer seems to have their own way of wording it. The BIOS Settings option is usually located near the bottom of the screen, or at the end of your BIOS options, depending on how it's structured. If you're having trouble finding it, look close to where the Save or Save & Exit options are because they're usually around those.

Another way to clear CMOS is to reseat the CMOS battery. Start by making sure your computer is unplugged. Next, open up your computer's case if you're using a desktop PC, or find and open the small CMOS battery panel if you're using a tablet or laptop computer.

Finally, remove the CMOS battery for a few minutes and then put it back in. Close the case or battery panel and then plug in, or reattach the computer's main battery. By disconnecting and then reconnecting the CMOS battery, you remove the source of power that saves your computer's BIOS settings, resetting them to default.

Another way to clear the CMOS is to short the CLEAR CMOS jumper on your motherboard, assuming your motherboard has one. Make sure your computer is unplugged and then open it up. Look around your motherboard's surface for a jumper with the CLEAR CMOS label, which will be located on the motherboard and near the jumper. These jumpers are often located near the BIOS chip itself or next to the CMOS battery. Some other names by which you might see this jumper labeled include CLRPWD, PASSWORD, or even just CLEAR.

Do all these things VERY carefully, if you are not comfortable, then ask someone else for help, if need be.
I tried the battery thing, nothing. idk how to go about the other options either
 
how do I do that if I can't see anything?
Yes, I know your problem, and you are also not getting any display, so that method obviously won't work in your case. I didn't ask you to try this method. I was just pointing out the easiest way to reset BIOS. That's why I gave you 3 options.

Like mentioned above, it won't be necessary, because those are just different methods for the same solution, and you have already tried reseating the CMOS battery..
 
While swapping and upgrading the PSU, did you make sure all the connections/cables were properly plugged (including ATX/CPU), and no damage was done to any PC components either ? Do you have a spare GPU to test on your PC ?

And I presume, you don't have any issues booting your OS via the Integrated Graphics Processor of your motherboard, and you also get proper display via this method ?
 

valaniftbuisness

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Dec 18, 2017
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1
525
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While swapping and upgrading the PSU, did you make sure all the connections/cables were properly plugged (including ATX/CPU), and no damage was done to any PC components either ? Do you have a spare GPU to test on your PC ?

And I presume, you don't have any issues booting your OS via the Integrated Graphics Processor of your motherboard, and you also get proper display via this method ?
funny enough I just tried the on board graphics and nothing. As for the cables, I've unplugged them a bunch of times and they are as secure as I can get them. Also I tried a different gpu and got nothing as well, the second one I used was a GTX 1050.
 

valaniftbuisness

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Dec 18, 2017
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So does this mean the MOBO is faulty then ?
that's the only thing I can think of. The only reason I can think of of how it broke is when I was installing the new cooling fan. I had to remove the motherboard and hold it and move it around and maybe I accidently scratched something. Would it be worth fixing or should I just buy a new one?
 
specs are
Intel Core i5 8600K
Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060
16 GB DDR4 Ram
1200W Rosewell 80 Gold Plus PSU
1 TB (I think Western digital) HDD

Problem started a few hours ago. added a new cpu fan and replaced 500w PSU with 1200 W PSU. computer was working fine before that, now I don't get any display.
I'd suggest going back to the old PSU. If that doesn't work, try also going back to the old CPU fan. Get yourself to the state identical to the last working combination, then move forward one step at a time from there.
 

valaniftbuisness

Prominent
Dec 18, 2017
14
1
525
1
I'd suggest going back to the old PSU. If that doesn't work, try also going back to the old CPU fan. Get yourself to the state identical to the last working combination, then move forward one step at a time from there.
I had tried the old PSU before and got the same result. honestly the new CPU fan is a pain to put together and I had already removed it before to check if the CPU was in correctly. I don't think then fan would make much of a difference
 
I agree that it shouldn't make a difference, but this situation is pretty odd, so my instinct is "put everything back the way it was" and see if it works.

That would indicate that there's SOMETHING up with the new components. I can't really imagine a fan causing the trouble, but, you never know. Or, if the heatsink isn't quite seated properly, then maybe the CPU is heating up fast and things are staying blank/idle to prevent damage.

But if going back to EVERYTHING as it was when it last worked doesn't help, then . . ouch. Probably motherboard as was suggested? But I'll leave that to the experts.
 
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