[SOLVED] Getting high temps with Gigabyte GTX 1660 OC ?

xenfur

Commendable
Jun 17, 2020
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Hello! Lately my gigabyte gtx 1660 has started hitting around 80-85c sometimes even 90. I've changed thermal paste, cleaned it even tried a more agressive fan curve but it still gets high temps. What could be the problem and how to fix it? My case is aerocool cs 107 v2 with 3 fans.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Liquid metal is not necessary here, and generally a bad idea if you've never used it before; if it rolls off the die and contacts SMDs, and you power it on like that, you can kiss that gpu goodbye.
Or, if you have an accident and it squirts out the tube... that's gonna be a pain to clean up.

The CS107 V2 does not look to have the most favorable airflow for gpus, but if it was fine before, then:
1)Did you dust off the gpu when you took it apart?
2)You can confirm that the gpu's fans and other fans in the chassis still work?
3)MX-4 may not have been ideal here. The surface of a bare silicon die is different enough that it changes what pastes work. MX-4's formula may not be thick and sticky enough for this. Are any of the following pastes available to you?
Noctua NT-H2
Prolimatech PK-3
Gelid GC Extreme
Kingpin KPx
Cooler Master Mastergel Pro V2
 
Last edited:

LucasPerks

Prominent
Jan 25, 2020
130
1
595
1
Hello! Lately my gigabyte gtx 1660 has started hitting around 80-85c sometimes even 90. I've changed thermal paste, cleaned it even tried a more agressive fan curve but it still gets high temps. What could be the problem and how to fix it? My case is aerocool cs 107 v2 with 3 fans.
It may be the environment your in or your case does not have good enough air flow. If possible try testing the temps without the case. Its time consuming but it could be worth it.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
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High temps are caused by one of four things.
1. Something not working on the cooling system.
a. Fan Failure
b. Thermal transfer paste failure.
c. Thermal transfer mechanism failure (ie heat pipes if applicable)

2. System overclocks creating more heat than the cooling system can exchange to the ambient.

3. Ambient temperature is too high to exchange necessary heat.
a. Not enough case airflow
b. Ambient air temperature is too hot.

4. Card is running at max capacity and thermal ceiling is being approached or lightly hit. (Not really an issue but needs to be recognized as normal operation)


Safe operating thermal ceiling is going to be around 85 before throttling is going to occur. The biggest question here is your card just running maxed out during gameplay or is something actually wrong? If everything is working mechanically correct then you may need to look at an underclock,
 

xenfur

Commendable
Jun 17, 2020
76
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1,535
0
High temps are caused by one of four things.
1. Something not working on the cooling system.
a. Fan Failure
b. Thermal transfer paste failure.
c. Thermal transfer mechanism failure (ie heat pipes if applicable)

2. System overclocks creating more heat than the cooling system can exchange to the ambient.

3. Ambient temperature is too high to exchange necessary heat.
a. Not enough case airflow
b. Ambient air temperature is too hot.

4. Card is running at max capacity and thermal ceiling is being approached or lightly hit. (Not really an issue but needs to be recognized as normal operation)


Safe operating thermal ceiling is going to be around 85 before throttling is going to occur. The biggest question here is your card just running maxed out during gameplay or is something actually wrong? If everything is working mechanically correct then you may need to look at an underclock,
So ig liqiud metal is the cheapest option? Because I'm looking to sell my pc and I don't want to sell a pc with a gpu that you can boil water on.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Liquid metal is not necessary here, and generally a bad idea if you've never used it before; if it rolls off the die and contacts SMDs, and you power it on like that, you can kiss that gpu goodbye.
Or, if you have an accident and it squirts out the tube... that's gonna be a pain to clean up.

The CS107 V2 does not look to have the most favorable airflow for gpus, but if it was fine before, then:
1)Did you dust off the gpu when you took it apart?
2)You can confirm that the gpu's fans and other fans in the chassis still work?
3)MX-4 may not have been ideal here. The surface of a bare silicon die is different enough that it changes what pastes work. MX-4's formula may not be thick and sticky enough for this. Are any of the following pastes available to you?
Noctua NT-H2
Prolimatech PK-3
Gelid GC Extreme
Kingpin KPx
Cooler Master Mastergel Pro V2
 
Last edited:

xenfur

Commendable
Jun 17, 2020
76
1
1,535
0
Liquid metal is not necessary here, and generally a bad idea if you've never used it before; if it rolls off the die and contacts SMDs, and you power it on like that, you can kiss that gpu goodbye.
Or, if you have an accident and it squirts out the tube... that's gonna be a pain to clean up.

The CS107 V2 does not look to have the most favorable airflow for gpus, but if it was fine before, then:
1)Did you dust off the gpu when you took it apart?
2)You can confirm that the gpu's fans and other fans in the chassis still work?
3)MX-4 may not have been ideal here. The surface of a bare silicon die is different enough that it changes what pastes work. MX-4's formula may not be thick and sticky enough for this. Are any of the following pastes available to you?
Noctua NT-H2
Prolimatech PK-3
Gelid GC Extreme
Kingpin KPx
Cooler Master Mastergel Pro V2
Yes, I did dust off the gpu and all of the fans work. I have all of the thermal pastes expect the Kingpin KPx available to me.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
636
159
11,390
66
What you use for transfer paste isn't really as important as proper installation. I know I am going to catch it in here for saying this but while there are better and worse compounds the stuff on the shelf from best buy works almost as good as anything you are going to buy and you aren't trying for some magical liquid N2 overclock. Just make sure that all of the old material is mechanically removed. Then clean it with rubbing alcohol and let it dry. It should be visibly clean of all thermal material. When reapplying, regardless of pads or paste, you only get one shot. In the case of paste do not draw with it, apply it as a pea sized (or appropriate size for the chip package) blob and smash it straight down as you apply the sink. If you draw lines or squiggles you will trap air pockets and what you are trying to do is apply a uniform application of paste that completely mates contact. Pads go the same. The biggest thing is if you remove, lift or try to reseat the sinks start over with the thermal compound. Pulling and reseating without fresh application will cause gaps that grossly reduce thermal transfer.
 

xenfur

Commendable
Jun 17, 2020
76
1
1,535
0
What you use for transfer paste isn't really as important as proper installation. I know I am going to catch it in here for saying this but while there are better and worse compounds the stuff on the shelf from best buy works almost as good as anything you are going to buy and you aren't trying for some magical liquid N2 overclock. Just make sure that all of the old material is mechanically removed. Then clean it with rubbing alcohol and let it dry. It should be visibly clean of all thermal material. When reapplying, regardless of pads or paste, you only get one shot. In the case of paste do not draw with it, apply it as a pea sized (or appropriate size for the chip package) blob and smash it straight down as you apply the sink. If you draw lines or squiggles you will trap air pockets and what you are trying to do is apply a uniform application of paste that completely mates contact. Pads go the same. The biggest thing is if you remove, lift or try to reseat the sinks start over with the thermal compound. Pulling and reseating without fresh application will cause gaps that grossly reduce thermal transfer.
I have reapplied for like 3 times already, each time I've cleaned the old one properly with isopropyl alcohol and non of those times I've reseated the heatsink
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
636
159
11,390
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If applied properly the likelihood of the compound you are using drastically improving your thermals is pretty low especially with fresh applications. Quality thermal compounds real magic is stable performance and longevity. The reason we sometimes need to reapply is that the original compound dries out over time. In fresh application just about anything works, including toothpaste (Please do not do this.). You are either just maxing out the card (which your thermal numbers are still in ceiling) or you have a fan / ambient case temp issue.

Also back to your original boil water comment. Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. Not 85.
 

xenfur

Commendable
Jun 17, 2020
76
1
1,535
0
Liquid metal is not necessary here, and generally a bad idea if you've never used it before; if it rolls off the die and contacts SMDs, and you power it on like that, you can kiss that gpu goodbye.
Or, if you have an accident and it squirts out the tube... that's gonna be a pain to clean up.

The CS107 V2 does not look to have the most favorable airflow for gpus, but if it was fine before, then:
1)Did you dust off the gpu when you took it apart?
2)You can confirm that the gpu's fans and other fans in the chassis still work?
3)MX-4 may not have been ideal here. The surface of a bare silicon die is different enough that it changes what pastes work. MX-4's formula may not be thick and sticky enough for this. Are any of the following pastes available to you?
Noctua NT-H2
Prolimatech PK-3
Gelid GC Extreme
Kingpin KPx
Cooler Master Mastergel Pro V2
Yep the cooler master mastergel pro v2 really worked, I got 70c max on superposition and on fornite it doesn't go above 55.
 

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