Question Getting temps of 43 c in idle with noctua u12s

Jul 7, 2020
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So I got the noctua u12s and I went to check my temps in bios and it said I had idle temps of 43c is that normal?

CPU i5-4690K not overclocked
Case corsair 230t carbide
GPU gtx 970.
 
Jul 7, 2020
20
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So I recently got the noctua u12s and went to check the temps on bios and it said I had 43 c on idle, is that normal?
CPU i5-4690K not oc
GPU gtx 970
Case 230t carbide by corsair
Fans one exhaust two intake
Push configuration for cpu fan.
 
The Corsair 230T should be fairly decent on airflow as it has a mesh front. Double check for dust on the mesh and fans and reinstalling the CPU cooler is not a bad thing as that may well drop the temps.
 
Jul 7, 2020
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42°C in BIOS is absolutely normal. BIOS isn't idle, it's closer to a 50% load or better, so always reads higher as compared to after windows finally loads and takes over services and processes manipulation.
Oh thank you. I should probably get something like core temp.
 
Jul 7, 2020
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Get asap the core temp program, in bios i have too on my i7-4790k around like 38-42 degrees, but as karad said, bios isnt idle, in windows at idle i got 29 degrees with Noctua NH-D15
So I checked and it said 40c idle 51 c under full load using hwinfo. So I check the fan and when in idle it runs only 300 rpm. Is that fine because I really dont feel like taking off the heatsink and reapplying thermal paste but if I have to I will.
 
Last edited:

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
There's a few points that need to be clarified in this thread.

Ambient temperature: The International Standard for "normal" room temperature is 22°C or 72°F. Here's the temperature conversions and a short scale:



As ambient temperature increases, thermal headroom and overclocking potential decreases.

"Idle": There is no software "load" in BIOS. "CPU" temperature in BIOS is the hottest "Core", which is higher than in Windows at minimum idle, because the processor boots without any power saving features and at higher voltage to ensure that it will initialize under any normal circumstances. "Idle" is 1% CPU Utilization in Windows Task Manager. Anything more is NOT "idle" and will not show minimum Core temperature.

"Full Load": As many users don't define "full load" it could mean anything. "Full Load" is a steady-state 100% TDP workload. Games and apps are fluctuating workloads that vary widely according to how they allocate CPU and GPU workloads. CPU “Stress” tests also vary widely and can be characterized into two categories; stability tests which are fluctuating workloads, and thermal tests which are steady workloads.

Utilities that don't overload or underload your processor will give you a valid thermal baseline. Here’s a comparison of utilities grouped as thermal and stability tests according to % of TDP, averaged across six processor Generations at stock settings rounded to the nearest 5%:



Although these tests range from 70% to 130% TDP workload, Windows Task Manager interprets every test as 100% CPU Utilization, which is processor resource activity, not actual workload. Core temperatures respond directly to Power consumption (Watts), which is driven by workload.

Although most Intel processors "Throttle" at 100°C, the consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders and expert overclockers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity. Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Temperature numbers get tossed around forums like gorilla poo in a cage which makes it extremely difficult to make any meaningful apples to apples comparisons, so all you end up with is thermal fruit salad in a blender with gorilla poo dressing. When discussing this topic, it's very important to be very specific about ambient temperature, as well as defining your "idle and "full load" test conditions.

CT :sol:
 

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