Gigabit cabling

davemar14

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What type of network cable do you need to run gigabit? My main machine is connected via a cat5e 50ft. cable to the router currently. Could I use this same cable for giabit, or do I need to purchase a cat6 cable?

My System:
<A HREF="http://amdgamingrig.dyndns.org" target="_new">http://amdgamingrig.dyndns.org</A>
 

riser

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Cat5e is the minimum for using Gigabit.

Cat5E is above the standard specs of Cat5e (notice upper/lower case of the E).

Cat 6 is a higher standard, more twists per inch, etc. Can run up to and around 650-700ft. cat5e will run roughly 280ft.

Cat6 will run further and was really designed for gigabit, but Cat5e was put out while cat6 was in the works. Only major benefit for cat6 is the distance it can run.
 

davemar14

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Cool. My cat5e is only 50 ft, so that is way under the specifications. Should be good to go then with gigabit.

My System:
<A HREF="http://amdgamingrig.dyndns.org" target="_new">http://amdgamingrig.dyndns.org</A>
 

riser

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Just need a gigabit NICs and if you're connected via a switch/router, need that to be gigabit capable.

It's only good for between computers at this point at home..
 

thinair

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No copper ethernet cabling run should be run further then 295' (100m), I'm curious to see where you got 650-700' from. Also, Cat5e and Cat5E?? Again, I've never heard of a difference, aside from some companies like to capitalize the 'e' and some don't.

The most important part of cabling to me is the termination of the cable, so just take care of crimping the ends or punching down the cable and you'll be ok.

Also, as you know, you'll need gigabit NIC's, and a gigabit switch. A gigabit router is only needed if you're routing between two gigabit networks. Many companies already make gigabit home switches, access-points, etc, etc.
 

spedwards

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Just need a gigabit NICs and if you're connected via a switch/router, need that to be gigabit capable.

It's only good for between computers at this point at home..
riser,

Your last comment is an aside, but if you could expand a little, this is the nub of the question on my mind. All the "gigabit" routers I've looked at have a 10/100 port on the wan side and say, 4 1000/100/10 ports on the lan side.

I have a new computer with a gigabit ethernet card. I share the internet connection with my wife and daughter via a router and hub. What I am hoping for is a faster internet connection for my computer, thinking the gigabit ethernet card ought to be able to deliver more than the 100/10 card on my old computer.

Do routers such as those described above provide the faster connection on the lan side only? Do ISPs not provide more capability to take advantage of the faster card?

Thanks if you can clear this up for me.
 

Madwand

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What I am hoping for is a faster internet connection for my computer, thinking the gigabit ethernet card ought to be able to deliver more than the 100/10 card on my old computer.
The problem here is that your internet speed is not limited by the 10/100 card. It's very unlikely to be more than 100 Mb/s, and more likely around 3 Mb/s. If it's too slow, you should shop around locally, perhaps even talk with others in your area about who give faster internet service affordably.

Perhaps my last post in this thread will illustrate the issues:

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/network/Dual-working-dual-ftopict21816.html
 

spedwards

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What I am hoping for is a faster internet connection for my computer, thinking the gigabit ethernet card ought to be able to deliver more than the 100/10 card on my old computer.
The problem here is that your internet speed is not limited by the 10/100 card. It's very unlikely to be more than 100 Mb/s, and more likely around 3 Mb/s. If it's too slow, you should shop around locally, perhaps even talk with others in your area about who give faster internet service affordably.

Perhaps my last post in this thread will illustrate the issues:

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/network/Dual-working-dual-ftopict21816.html

Madwand, thanks so much for the perspective on the issue. The fastest speed I've measured is maybe 1 Mb/s, using the Tweakmaster connection speed tool. At least now I know what options might help and what won't. Glad I didn't buy a new router. Thanks again.
 

gpfear

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Cat 6 has more to do with the center cable running through it than with the twists of the pairs. This is what increases the cable's throughput. I have 11 phone jacks in the house all run with leftover Cat5. makes it easy to switch them over to network drops if need be. Why 11 phone jacks you ask?? This was before cable modems, back when dialup was king. I will eventually get around to gigabit, when they up the ISP speeds.
 

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