Question Gigabyte M27Q monitor

Jan 5, 2021
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I wanted an actual monitor for my pc instead of sitting on my bed and using a wall mounted 55" tv (roughly 6 year old Vizio). But I wanted something somewhat future proof for if/when I update my 3 year old pc. I bought the Gigabyte M27Q the other day. It's a 27" 1440p 170hz monitor. I am a little worried it is going to be more monitor than my pc can handle though.

My pc specs are:
  • Ryzen 5 2600x cpu w/ stock cooler
  • MSI X370 Gaming Plus mobo
  • EVGA GTX 1070ti FTW gpu
  • 16gb 2x8 DDR4 2666hz ram
  • 650W 80+ (gold?) psu
  • 120gb SSD boot drive
  • 500gb SSD storage (new and currently empty)
  • 1tb 7200rpm HDD (where games are stored)
I'm not confident enough to overclock anything myself, but I think if it can't handle the monitor then that would help. Does anyone think my machine will handle the monitor decently enough? Maybe I'd I sacrifice some higher settings? I don't play fortnite or other fps competitive games. Some space games like Space Engineers or No Mans Sky, star wars games like Fallen Order, a little vr on an old Vive when I have the time.

So anyone think I bit off more than I can chew? Buying the monitor was going to be far cheaper than upgrading my rig. Plus I convinced the wife to let me buy it due to some Christmas money and the fact that I work from home and this will be a better second monitor that the old 32" tv I'm currently using with my newer HP x360 15" laptop that I bought last year bc I started working from home.

If you've read this far, you are awesome.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
In some games, sure, probably not going to get 60 FPS at max settings. But monitors last longer than GPUs, so you haven't made any sort of mistake.

For example, I have the slightly faster GTX1080, but I bought a 2560x1440 144hz display some three years ago now. Older games, 144FPS, slightly old games, 70-90FPS, and recent titles are just now dipping down into the low 50s at very high settings. I could lower the settings and get better performance. However, if you don't need high FPS to enjoy many of your titles, then, no problem.

And in a year or two when you replace the GPU, then you can enjoy your higher frame rates.

Your CPU will come into play when you are after maximum FPS, so overclocking isn't a must. GPUs do a pretty decent job of overclocking themselves. (For example, my GPU out of the box boosted to 2012Mhz, after overclocking (and water cooling) was able to achieve 2100Mhz a very mild gain) Though due to the water cooling it is very consistent.
 
Jan 5, 2021
3
0
10
0
In some games, sure, probably not going to get 60 FPS at max settings. But monitors last longer than GPUs, so you haven't made any sort of mistake.

For example, I have the slightly faster GTX1080, but I bought a 2560x1440 144hz display some three years ago now. Older games, 144FPS, slightly old games, 70-90FPS, and recent titles are just now dipping down into the low 50s at very high settings. I could lower the settings and get better performance. However, if you don't need high FPS to enjoy many of your titles, then, no problem.

And in a year or two when you replace the GPU, then you can enjoy your higher frame rates.

Your CPU will come into play when you are after maximum FPS, so overclocking isn't a must. GPUs do a pretty decent job of overclocking themselves. (For example, my GPU out of the box boosted to 2012Mhz, after overclocking (and water cooling) was able to achieve 2100Mhz a very mild gain) Though due to the water cooling it is very consistent.
Thanks! That has helped ease my buyers remorse.
 

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