News Gigabyte Outs RTX 2080 Super With Liquid Cooling Block

Do note that technically a company can’t void your warranty over installing a different cooling solution, but that doesn't mean you won't incur headaches trying to invoke that right.
At the very least, replacing a graphics card's cooling solution probably should void the warranty. There's no guarantee that an aftermarket cooler will provide adequate cooling for the card, particularly for components other than the graphics processor itself, which could potentially end up trapped behind a water block with minimal airflow.

Some manufacturers may allow for it, but that's not going to be universal, since you are modifying the hardware. And if an aftermarket water block were to leak, or otherwise caused visible damage to the card, you can be pretty sure they are not going to replace it.
 

Blitz Hacker

Reputable
Jul 17, 2015
35
1
4,565
6
At the very least, replacing a graphics card's cooling solution probably should void the warranty. There's no guarantee that an aftermarket cooler will provide adequate cooling for the card, particularly for components other than the graphics processor itself, which could potentially end up trapped behind a water block with minimal airflow.

Some manufacturers may allow for it, but that's not going to be universal, since you are modifying the hardware. And if an aftermarket water block were to leak, or otherwise caused visible damage to the card, you can be pretty sure they are not going to replace it.
The right to repair clause does state that the repair or modification must not damage the existing product (or the company isn't liable for damages, which I'm assuming if the VRM's aren't cooled with a block for example that wouldn't be covered under warranty because you didn't correctly cool them, same thing with shorting the board.
Most of the time you can push this right legally if there is a defect in the card for example, but you would usually have to take them to court on it, which most if not all of us don't have the money (or time) to take a company to court, which they pretty much count on.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS