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[SOLVED] Gigabyte RTX 2070 Super, can OC'ing VRAM result in less lifespan?

aplesos6

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Jun 20, 2016
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I was doing some studying on OC'ing for RTX cards because I've decided after owning it for a while I'd like to boost the clocks a bit. What I read on one forum is that the Samsung memory chips don't like it too much when you OC the VRAM too hard. Can anyone help me understand better if it's okay to push the VRAM? I just got done OC'ing the core clock and I want to see how hard I can push the memory. I have a Gigabyte Gaming OC btw. Thanks.
 

MisterMeow

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Jan 29, 2016
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Just keep an eye out for things like artifacting when overclocking vram. From my experience, most the time I overclock the memory, I find the upper limit of a stable overclock, then dial it back a couple hundred mhz. It may run stable in most games, until you find that one game where it isn't. That always gave me the best results.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
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Anytime you overclock ANYTHING, you are decreasing the probable lifespan of it's components. There are no exceptions to that rule. The only question is whether the decrease is significant enough to be a concern, and that has to be judged on a case by case basis. Some minor to moderate overclocking of most CPUs or graphics cards is unlikely to cause any significant degradation to happen prematurely, but anything beyond that is purely "it might, it might not".

If you can reach an overclock on core or memory clock, that is stable, and remains within and preferably a comfortable distance below, the thermal specifications for that component, then it's probably fine. That does not change the fact that ALL overclocking that involves increasing voltage will shorten the lifespan of anything you do that to. Some cases you can actually increase the clocks on something, CPU or GPU, and REDUCE voltage, and remain stable, but doing extensive stability testing should be a priority and should never be skipped or shortcutted. Ever. If you are going to overclock, then do the work required to verify you are thermally compliant and that the configuration is as stable as can be verified for.
 

aplesos6

Reputable
Jun 20, 2016
16
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4,520
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Anytime you overclock ANYTHING, you are decreasing the probable lifespan of it's components. There are no exceptions to that rule. The only question is whether the decrease is significant enough to be a concern, and that has to be judged on a case by case basis. Some minor to moderate overclocking of most CPUs or graphics cards is unlikely to cause any significant degradation to happen prematurely, but anything beyond that is purely "it might, it might not".

If you can reach an overclock on core or memory clock, that is stable, and remains within and preferably a comfortable distance below, the thermal specifications for that component, then it's probably fine. That does not change the fact that ALL overclocking that involves increasing voltage will shorten the lifespan of anything you do that to. Some cases you can actually increase the clocks on something, CPU or GPU, and REDUCE voltage, and remain stable, but doing extensive stability testing should be a priority and should never be skipped or shortcutted. Ever. If you are going to overclock, then do the work required to verify you are thermally compliant and that the configuration is as stable as can be verified for.
Okay, thanks. I've definitely done testing with unigine and I never go above 61c in any game or benchmark, and I have an RTX card, so I can't change the voltages. I'll assume the lifespan wouldn't be majorly affected since I'm not pushing the card too hard. I never wanted to increase voltages anyway.
 

MisterMeow

Reputable
Jan 29, 2016
144
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Just keep an eye out for things like artifacting when overclocking vram. From my experience, most the time I overclock the memory, I find the upper limit of a stable overclock, then dial it back a couple hundred mhz. It may run stable in most games, until you find that one game where it isn't. That always gave me the best results.
 
Reactions: Darkbreeze

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