[SOLVED] gigabyte x470 aorus gaming 7 EDC at 100% CPU load

Aug 29, 2018
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hello. if this has been covered elsewhere i apologize, please redirect. i was looking to overclock my 2700x on my gigabyte x470 aorus gaming 7 wifi but notice that at stock ryzen master shows that the % EDC (electrical design current) is near the maximum of 140A (oddly there is a EDC value of 140A that the percentage is calculated from but a "limit" of 168A). this is with all cores operating at 100% load at around 3.95ghz.....stock settings. I am aware that windows power settings can cause this at idle but in my case im concerned about staying at the EDC limit while the processor is running at 100% across all cores. the computer runs 24/7 with all cores loaded to 100% to run scientific calculations.

if i change any overclocking settings in the BIOS i can no longer see an EDC reported by ryzen master. am i correct in assuming that if i was to overclock i would be exceeding the EDC limit? is there any way to measure EDC other than ryzen master as this doesnt work once overclocking? what would be a safe EDC target to aim for in a system that is running at 100% load across all cores 24/7? what is the main issue with running at or slightly over EDC assuming i keep my computer's VRMs cool? on a related note what is an ideal save limit on the vrms?

sorry for all the questions,


thanks kindly

p.s. my intended overclock isnt anything crazy, just looking for ~4.1-4.2Ghz across all cores....basically whatever is stable ~1.35-1.4v on the vcore and 1.15v on the vcore soc. effectively ~150-250mhz over the stock turbo boost i get (ie up from 3.95ghz) across all cores.
 
Right now your CPU is boosting, basically overclocking itself. When motherboard manufacturers set this option they have to set a voltage for the boost to operate. The boost voltage is typically higher than required because it's a general blanket setting to work with any cpu. If you manually set the speed and voltage there is a great chance you can achieve your goal speeds at the same voltage, possibly even lower than what you are getting now with auto settings.
 
Right now your CPU is boosting, basically overclocking itself. When motherboard manufacturers set this option they have to set a voltage for the boost to operate. The boost voltage is typically higher than required because it's a general blanket setting to work with any cpu. If you manually set the speed and voltage there is a great chance you can achieve your goal speeds at the same voltage, possibly even lower than what you are getting now with auto settings.
 
Aug 29, 2018
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thanks for the info! if i use the voltage that the stock settings are boosting to (i think ~1.35v) and manually set to the frequency to the highest stable id still be at the EDC (or higher?) that ryzen master reports for the stock chip....so still something like 99% of my 140A allowance. is this OK for continual use? i thought EDC was only for short bursts of activity, so my thinking was id have to lower it to be safe. is there a safe limit i should aim for with EDC or VRM temps if running 24/7?
 
Aug 29, 2018
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should also ask to clarify for myself: are VRM temps an indicator of EDC load or are these two different things? eg if at stock my VRMs are around 60 and then overclocked (where i cant measure EDC anymore) they stay around that value is it fair to assume that the EDC isnt increased substantially?
 
To be honest, i have no idea what EDC is and have never heard it mentioned in overclocking. I wouldn't worry about that number at all. Focus on the voltage and speed, use prime95 26.6 and realbench to test stability.
 

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