Question Gigabyte Z590-D, 5 beeps and the VGA LED is on?

Nov 30, 2022
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I bought my daughter a new desktop PC for school, and I facing up exactly the same problem: the built-in DisplayPort does not work. When starting the PC, 5 short beeps are heard and the VGA LED on the board is lit.

Motherboard: Gigabyte Z590 D
Processor: i7-11700
Memory: 2x4GB
SSD: M2 512GB
OS: not installed

I tried clearing the CMOS by shorting J17 for about 10 seconds with the power cord unplugged, but got the same result.
What should I do next?
Do I also need to order an external video adapter now? Or is it still possible to somehow make the built-in DisplayPort work?
BTW, is it possible that 8GB of RAM is not enough for the integrated video adapter to work?
 

Aeacus

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Processor: i7-11700
Are you certain that the CPU is i7-11700 and not i7-11700F?

Since if it's the i7-11700F, you will need dedicated GPU to see the image.

What should I do next?
It is possible that MoBo has old BIOS, which doesn't support the 11th gen CPU. In this case, look into BIOS update, or if you don't know how, haul your PC to PC repair shop and pay them to update the BIOS for you.

Do I also need to order an external video adapter now? Or is it still possible to somehow make the built-in DisplayPort work?
See my 1st reply.

BTW, is it possible that 8GB of RAM is not enough for the integrated video adapter to work?
No.
 
Nov 30, 2022
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Are you certain that the CPU is i7-11700 and not i7-11700F?
I think - Yes, cuz in PC specification I see:

CPU model: Core i7-11700
Integrated videocard model: Intel UHD Graphics 750

As I know, i7-11700F does not have videocard inside, so it should be i7-11700, but the idea is interesting, and what they actually installed there can only be shown by an autopsy ;).
I didnt try to install an external videocard there, cuz I would have to break out two brackets from the back, and in such form the computer would no longer be returned to the store.

It is possible that MoBo has old BIOS, which doesn't support the 11th gen CPU. In this case, look into BIOS update, or if you don't know how, haul your PC to PC repair shop and pay them to update the BIOS for you.
And this is perhaps the wisest thought! I myself didnt think of this, although I came across similar "transitional" models of MoBos before. Thanks a lot! 💋

BTW from other side among the BIOS updates, I see only one mention of a microcode update, and this is "Update CPU microcode version 0x34", but not a full gen 11 family...
 
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Reactions: Aeacus

Aeacus

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I didnt try to install an external videocard there, cuz I would have to break out two brackets from the back, and in such form the computer would no longer be returned to the store.
Well, you could take the MoBo out of the PC case and breadboard it, on any cardboard box, to install dedicated GPU, without puncturing out the PC case's PCI brackets.

But breadboarding MoBo, just to see if it would work with dedicated GPU, would be a lot of wasted work, especially since when PC does boot up with dedicated GPU and you end up using dedicated GPU anyways.

I myself didnt think of this, although I came across similar "transitional" models of MoBos before. Thanks a lot! 💋
You're welcome. :)
 
Nov 30, 2022
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Well, you could take the MoBo out of the PC case and breadboard it, on any cardboard box, to install dedicated GPU, without puncturing out the PC case's PCI brackets.
Totally agree, but these "bastards" glued warranty paper caps to the screw heads, at least to one screw of each screwed part, including the MoBo :ROFLMAO:
So I think tomorrow morning I return PC back to the store - let 'em deal with the problem on their own ;)
 

Aeacus

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Totally agree, but these "bastards" glued warranty paper caps to the screw heads, at least to one screw of each screwed part, including the MoBo :ROFLMAO:
Here's a question: if you're good around PCs, then why buy the overpriced prebuilt? :unsure: Why not buy the PC as parts and them assemble it by yourself? Might want to even include her. She could learn thing or two and it would be nice experience for the both of you. :)

In DIY, you get the best performance to price ratio, can choose whatever part you desire (not bound what prebuilt offers) and warranty isn't for PC as a whole, but for individual parts (so when one part dies, you return it, rather than whole PC).

E.g this fine number:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-13600K 3.5 GHz 14-Core Processor ($314.99 @ B&H)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer i35 A-RGB CPU Cooler ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI MPG Z790 EDGE WIFI DDR4 ATX LGA1700 Motherboard ($369.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($57.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 3.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($97.08 @ Amazon)
Case: BitFenix Nova Mesh SE ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.90 @ Newegg Sellers)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus 650 Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($136.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1095.93

Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-11-30 22:51 EST-0500


Take this build as a guideline and feel free to play around in pcpp, swapping components if need be.

But few words:

Build color theme - White with some touches of purple and ARGB fans for eyecandy.

CPU - solid Core i5 and currently best for gaming (not that she does that, i don't know, but just in case). Also CPU offers overclocking, if she is into that.
CPU cooler - another solid mid-sized air cooler, with ARGB fan for eyecandy.
MoBo - from MSI, in a neat white theme, with on-board wi-fi, among other things.
RAM - 2x 8GB (16GB in total) running at sweet 3200 Mhz. With white heatsinks of course, to match the build theme. Also, the RAM is DDR4, which is far cheaper than the latest DDR5 RAM. To use DDR5 RAM, MoBo must be replaced as well.
SSD - Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1TB. Relatively cheap, while offering top performance and reliability. Also NVMe drive for fastest read/load. (I also have 970 Evo Plus as my OS drive, but mine is 2TB in size.)
PC Case - relatively unique looking PC case from Bitfenix. Has nice white theme with some purple on front grille, a nice touch for young lady. Also, comes with several ARGB fans for additional eyecandy and is overall well ventilated PC case. Note: PC case is personal choice and feel free to switch it out.
PSU - solid PSU from Seasonic. Fully modular, 650W capacity and 10 years of warranty. (All 3 of my PCs are also powered by Seasonic, full specs with pics in my sig.)

Additional words:

I didn't include dedicated GPU, since CPU has iGPU in it and PC can be used without dedicated GPU. However, PC is ready for dedicated GPU as well, up to RTX 3060 Ti. While RTX 3070 can also work in it, i'd be more comfortable with 700W range PSU in there.
As the build stands, it's relevant lifespan (especially with dedicated GPU) is easy 5+ years. Perhaps even 10+ years if GPU is upgraded down the line, to keep up with latest games.
Oh, no BIOS update or anything like that needed. Z790 chipset MoBo supports Intel 13th gen off the bat.
 
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Reactions: Samantha Sommers
Nov 30, 2022
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In order to build a computer on your own, you need constant assembly experience. The last time I built my computer was over 10 years ago, with the following configuration (just so you get an idea of how long ago it was):
Processor: i7-3770K
CPU Fan: Be Quiet! Dark Rock TF
Motherboard: Intel DZ77GA-70K
Memory: 4 x Kingston HyperX KHX2400C11D3/8GX modules
Video: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 960 4GB
addon HDD/SDD adapter1: Marvel 88SE9230 4 Ports SATA 6Gb/s Controller
addon HDD/SDD adapter2: Marvell 88SS1093 PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe 1.1 SSD Controller
Blue-Ray drive: ASUS BW-16D1HT
+ a pretty good 700W power supply, and a dozen different drives (HDDs and SSDs), the computer still works, in multi-boot mode (Windows XP/7/10/11/Linux Kubuntu LTS Release).
In order to build a new balanced computer on your own, you need time to study new components, read a bunch of reviews on the net. Sometimes it’s easier to take a ready-made solution, especially since I didn’t make any serious demands on the characteristics of the computer, and I had to meet about $1000 in terms of money, just I had to start somewhere.
Anyways, thank you so much for the recommendations and for sharing your experience, maybe I will use them - in our time everything changes very, very quickly, so it's better to use proven working solutions and not chase the latest super developments ;)
:beercheers::beercheers::beercheers:
 
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Aeacus

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In order to build a computer on your own, you need constant assembly experience.
Actually, no.

There aren't any PC building courses anyone can take (AFAIK), and all experience comes from building your own. And while it may seem daunting task, no experience comes when you do nothing. Even i didn't have a job, behind PC assembly line, to know how to assemble one. Instead i bought the parts, read the manuals/guides and assembled my PCs on my own. Sure, i have decades of experience but even i didn't born the knowledge of PC assemble (no-one does).

Due to that, anyone can assemble a PC. There are plenty of guides out there and if you've already assembled one, despite years ago, you have good idea how to do it now. We still have MoBo, CPU, CPU cooler, RAM, disk drives, PC case, PSU. MoBos are either mini-ITX, micro-ATX, ATX or E-ATX. Same with PSU, either ATX or smaller SFX. PC cases follow the same pattern. RAM is very easy to install. Same with CPU. And CPU cooler still needs 4 mounting holes to mount it.
Sure, hardware has improved over the years but fundamental is still the same.

In order to build a new balanced computer on your own, you need time to study new components, read a bunch of reviews on the net.
True, especially when you want most bang for the buck.

Sometimes it’s easier to take a ready-made solution
Is it? Since prebuilt PCs, often come with QA (quality assurance) issues or arrive DOA.
GamersNexus has reviewed several prebuilt PCs lately and there is no perfect PC. Each one has issues, sometimes even severe ones.
Full playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsuVSmND84QuM2HKzG7ipbIbE_R5EnCLM

PCs are delicate electronics and need care, both assembly and shipping. But for courier, they often doesn't know what's inside the box and toss them around willy-nilly. E.g even the one you bought. If the proper QA would be in place, PC would've been tested prior shipping, to iron out all flaws/bugs. But it looks to me, it wasn't. So, you now have to spend your time and gasoline to make up from someone else's mistake. Yeah, prebuilt PCs doesn't look "that" good, paying far more than components are worth it and even then, PC doesn't work.

and I had to meet about $1000 in terms of money, just I had to start somewhere.
The build i suggested above comes pretty close to your budget.

And just for fun, here is PC performance comparison between your prebuilt and what i suggested;
yours as Base, my suggestion as Alternative:

Userbenchmark PC Build Comparison

Baseline Bench: Game 16%, Desk 89%, Work 16%
CPU: Intel Core i7-11700
GPU: Intel UHD Graphics 750
SSD: Samsung 960 Pro NVMe PCIe M.2 512GB
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 2400 C16 2x4GB

Alternative Bench: Game 20%, Desk 111%, Work 21%
CPU: Intel Core i5-13600K
GPU: Intel UHD Graphics 770
SSD: Samsung 970 Evo Plus NVMe PCIe M.2 1TB
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 C16 2x8GB

Far better performance with same amount of money. :sarcastic:

in our time everything changes very, very quickly, so it's better to use proven working solutions and not chase the latest super developments
True, hence why i didn't put DDR5 into the build. :D Not that DDR5 doesn't work. It does, but the performance gain over DDR4 doesn't justify the premium price of DDR5. Double or even quadruple of what DDR4 costs.

Then again, companies who have been at it for decades (Intel, MSI, Corsair etc), are extremely unlikely to release half-baked product, that doesn't work like it is supposed to. E.g like the latest venture of Intel, trying their hand in GPU market, by Intel ARC 750 or ARC 770 GPUs. Intel is very solid on making CPUs but with GPUs, they struggle. Namely with GPU drivers.
 

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