Question Gigabyte Z97X Gaming 3 temperature sensors wrong?

Jun 26, 2019
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in Gigabyte System Information Viewer, the "System" temperature constantly stays at 40 or 39 and never changes, why?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Because that is a motherboard temperature sensor and does not react to load conditions quickly like the CPU temperature sensors do. Have you actually put the system under a heavy load like Prime95 or Realbench, for 15 minutes or longer, and monitored those sensor readings to verify that they don't move?

If you do that, and they don't, then it may be that it's a very old motherboard or one with with a faulty sensor, or it could be a problem with the monitoring software.

If you are not using HWinfo (NOT HWmonitor or speccy or Openhardware monitor) then I'd try that and see if you get different results. HWinfo is generally more accurate and has better compatibility with a much broader range of chipsets, and is kept more religiously up to date.
 
Jun 26, 2019
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Thank you for the answer. So since my fan RPMs change depending on the "System" temperature, it means that they will always stay at the 40 celsius speed? Can i somehow change what temperature my fans look at to change their RPMs?

Or is there simply no need for that?
 
Jun 26, 2019
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Also, will i be alright doing the stress test? Ive tried it for a minute and its quite scary seeing my CPU at around 100 celsius. I have an Intel i7 4790K by the way.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, there is a problem if your CPU temperatures are at 100°C.

What software utility are you using to monitor temperatures?

What program are you running when you see temps that high?

What are your FULL hardware specifications?

CPU fan model, case fan models, case fan locations, how MANY case fans, motherboard, PSU (Exact model), case, etc.?
 
Jun 26, 2019
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i mainly use Gigabyte System Information Viewer when looking at temps, i used HWinfo too.

i used RealBench just like you recommended

Intel i7 4790K with the stock cooler, 2 Cooler Master A12025-20RB-3BN-F1, i got one in the back at the top, the other in the front at the bottom, 2 fans, Gigabyte Z97X Gaming 3, FSP700-50ARN, not sure what case, cant find info.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do us both a favor. Download Prime95 version 26.6.

https://www.technic3d.com/download/overclocking-und-monitoring-tools/24-prime-95-v26.6.htm

Open HWinfo. Run Prime95.

In the menu choose the torture test option, select Small FFT. Run it. After about 10 seconds take screenshots with it running (Not worried about Prime being in the screenshots) of the HWinfo sensors. It will usually take about three screenshots, scroll down in between screenshots, to capture all of them. Upload the captured images to www.imgur.com or www.tinypic.com.

Post the images here using the insert image function on the toolbar above each post.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 version 26.6 or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo



For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp



Posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:

How to post images on Tom's hardware forums
 
Jun 26, 2019
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I'd say this is pretty much idle, except for a few programs running, like spotify, firefox, discord
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That still looks high, and it isn't actually AT idle in that screenshot. Close everything except for HWinfo, all browser tabs, any other extra running programs (not system processes, just applications that you have currently open) and let the system sit while watching the HWinfo sensors. When you see CPU usage drop to pretty much zero for all cores, THEN take a screenshot of the HWinfo sensors again. Sorry, I should have been clearer in the beginning.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, that's good right there.

So, couple more questions. Are you overclocking, or is there a reason why your CPU frequency is not dropping back to at or below the base clock at idle?

What is your power plan in the control panel power settings set to? If it's set to performance I would go into the advanced plan settings by clicking on "Change plan settings" and then Advanced settings, and then expand processor power management and set the minimum ratio to 8%. Save and exit. That will help SOME and then we can get a better idea of the actual CPU thermals at idle.

Honestly, I think you have a cooling issue. Could be the cooler has come loose in one spot or the thermal paste is old and needs to be changed. I would check the cooler mounting. If you don't have any thermal paste to use, then wait to do that until you can get some. Most tech stores or repair shops, or just about anyplace online, sells it.

I'd recommend Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut or Noctua NT-H1/H2, but even something like Arctic Silver 5 or Arctic MX-4 should work fine.
 
Jun 26, 2019
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I am not overclocking, but Gigabyte Easy Tune set my clock to 4.40GHz as far as i know, they say its stock. I set the minimum ratio to 8% just now. I also replaced the thermal paste about a month ago, i hope i did a fine job. I cannot check the cooler mount right now, but i think its alright, but i will check.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would not recommend using Gigabyte Easy tune. I would remove any automatic overclock settings in the BIOS, reset the BIOS to the default settings, reconfigure the XMP profile for your memory and save settings. Automatic utilities and profiles use MUCH more voltage than necessary, and generally speaking we recommend avoiding using them especially on older systems. Some of the newer platforms have greatly improved the profiles and configurations with their automatic settings, but even then a manual configuration is always, always, superior and usually results in much lower temperatures due to a decrease in voltage from what the automatic profile uses. Core voltage, that is, for the CPU.

Plus, the Easytune overclock is not recommended for use with the stock cooler. Only when you have good aftermarket cooling. Get rid of it. The Easy tune I mean.

Set the system back to the default settings and then reconfigure your fan profiles, memory XMP settings and any other custom settings you wish to configure such as boot order etc., and then save settings and exit and boot to Windows. Also, change the advanced power profile plan settings like I suggested. It will absolutely help.

Also, in the BIOS, make SURE that Intel speed step is ENABLED and that the various C-state low power settings like C1, C6, C7, etc., are set to Auto or Enabled.
 
Jun 26, 2019
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thank you, i will do as you instructed. but one final question, which i asked in the beginning.

since my fan RPMs change depending on the "System" temperature, it means that they will always stay at the 40 celsius speed? Can i somehow change what temperature my fans look at to change their RPMs?

Or is there simply no need for that?
 
Jun 26, 2019
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Well, really big thank you for everything, i will now go to sleep, but if you reply, ill read it tomorrow. Goodbye, and as i said, HUGE thank you for everything!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So, based on the part numbers you gave me those are Cooler Master Sickle Flow 120's, which are 3 pin DC controlled fans. The four pin PWM headers on your motherboard will not allow for variable control on those fans. If they are connected directly to four pin Molex connectors coming off the power supply, instead of being connected to the motherboard, those will still be full time 100% operation.

Unless you have an aftermarket fan controller that allows for variable control of 3 pin DC controlled fans off of a 4 pin PWM motherboard header, your fans are always on full speed. Only the CPU fan is likely to change speed because that stock cooler uses a 4 pin PWM fan connected to the CPU_FAN header, or at least that's how it SHOULD be connected.

IF you can take an post a few pictures of your case, I might be able to figure out what it is. More importantly, we can determine what fan support it has.

I really think that you want to consider replacing those fans and the CPU cooler with an aftermarket unit.
 
Jun 26, 2019
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i can control the 2 case fans using Gigabyte System Information Viewer, more specifically the Advanced Smart Fan tab of the program. i will also send a few pictures of the case soon.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Does that case have a fan location in the top rear (Not the rear top where you already have a fan)?

Your motherboard must have the ability to control both DC and PWM style fans on it's fan headers, which is unusual for a Z97 motherboard because even my Z170 Gigabyte Gaming 5 didn't have that feature yet and could not control 3 pin fans, only PWM.

Are you sure about the fan model?

Anyhow, regardless, I think better cooling is the key. Also, your motherboard being at 40°C is not an issue. That is totally fine. Your CPU core temps however, are not. They are not good at idle OR under a load. They are about 20°C above the absolutel maximum you want to ever see them under a full load.

For now, I would reset the BIOS to the default settings, like I said before, and then set the memory back to the XMP profile and readjust your fans or any other settings you need to. At those temps you are going to destroy your CPU and/or motherboard in before long.

When you get a good CPU cooler, you can try your hand at overclocking the CPU, but I'd do it correctly, using manual settings, not with Easy tune.

Below is my list of preferred CPU AIR coolers, also known as Heatsink fans (HSF).

Do not look here for recommendations on water/liquid cooling solutions. There are none to be found.


They are basically listed in order of preference, from top to bottom. To some degree that preference is based on known performance on similarly overclocked configurations, but not entirely. There are likely a couple of units that are placed closer to the top not because they offer purely better performance than another cooler which is below it, but potentially due to a variety of reasons.

One model might be placed higher than another with the same or similar performance, but has quieter or higher quality fans. It may have the same performance but a better warranty. Long term quality may be higher. It may be less expensive in some cases. Maybe it performs slightly worse, but has quieter fans and a better "fan pitch". Some fans with equal decibel levels do not "sound" like they are the same as the specific pitch heard from one fan might be less annoying than another.

In any case, these are not "tiered" and are not a 100% be all, end all ranking. They are simply MY preference when looking at coolers for a build or when making recommendations. Often, which HSF gets chosen depends on what is on this list and fits the budget or is priced right at the time due to a sale or rebate. Hopefully it will help you and you can rest assured that every cooler listed here is a model that to some degree or other is generally a quality unit which is a lot more likely to be worth the money spent on it than on many other models out there that might look to be a similarly worthwhile investment.

Certainly there are a great many other very good coolers out there, but these are models which are usually available to most anybody building a system or looking for a cooler, regardless of what part of the world they might live in. As always, professional reviews are usually an absolutely essential part of the process of finding a cooler so if you are looking at a model not listed here, I would highly recommend looking at at least two or three professional reviews first.

If you cannot find two reviews of any given cooler, it is likely either too new to have been reviewed yet or it sucked, and nobody wanted to buy one in order to review it plus the manufacturer refused to send samples out to the sites that perform reviews because they knew it would likely get bad publicity.

IMO, nobody out there is making better fans, overall, than Noctua, followed pretty closely by Thermalright. So if you intend to match case fans to the same brand on your HSF, those are pretty hard to beat. Of course, Corsair has it's Maglev fans, and those are pretty damn good too, but since they don't make CPU air cooling products, only AIO water coolers, they cannot join the party.


Noctua NH-D14 (Replace stock fans with NF-A14 industrialPPC 2000rpm)
Noctua NH-D15/D15 SE-AM4
Noctua NH-D14 (With original fans)
Thermalright Silver arrow IB-E Extreme
Phanteks PH-TC14PE (BK,BL, OR or RD)
Cryorig R1 Ultimate or Universal
Thermalright Legrand Macho RT
FSP Windale 6
Scythe Mugen 5 rev.b
Noctua NH-U14S
Thermalright Macho rev.B
Thermalright Macho (Direct, 120)
Scythe Mugen max
BeQuiet dark rock pro (3 or 4)
BeQuiet dark rock (3 or 4)
Deepcool Assassin II
Thermalright true spirit 140 (Direct, Power, BW)
Cryorig H5
Noctua NH-U12S
Phanteks PH-TC12DX (Any)
Phanteks PH-TC14S
Cryorig H7
Deepcool Gammaxx 400

Cooler Master Hyper 212 (EVO, X, RGB. I'd only recommend this cooler if no other good aftermarket models are available to you.)


It may not be obvious, but is probably worth mentioning, that not all cooler models will fit all CPU sockets as aftermarket coolers generally require an adapter intended for use with that socket. Some coolers that fit an AMD platform might not fit a later AMD platform, or an Intel platform. Often these coolers come with adapters for multiple types of platforms but be sure to verify that a specific cooler WILL work with your platform before purchasing one and finding out later that it will not.


 
Jun 26, 2019
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no, the case doesnt have locations on top of it. i am quite sure about the fan model, as the numbers i sent were on the fans themselves. i already resetted the BIOS settings, but im not sure how to do the XMP stuff or how to readjust my fans, as id like them to do it automatically, but as i said they only auto readjust judging by the motherboard temperature (~40c), so they always stay at almost the same speed and im not sure if thats exactly good. i will definitely look into CPU coolers, but it is quite dissapointing that the stock one isnt good enough.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so like I said before, I don't think those fans CAN adjust when used with that motherboard. Just because there are settings for auto control of the fans in the BIOS or in your desktop software, doesn't mean that is what is actually happening. That motherboard cannot control those three pin fans, so unless you have an aftermarket fan control hub or controller separate from the motherboard, they don't change speed based on anything the motherboard or other hardware might be doing. They just, can't.

There is no provision indicated in the manual for that board saying it can do both DC and PWM control (And in that generation it was not commonly found), and like I said, I have one generation newer board model than that in the Z170x-Gaming 5, a higher tiered board, and it cannot do DC speed control on 3 pin fans. Full speed only unless you use PWM four pin fans.

The stock coolers are never good enough AND that CPU NEVER CAME with a stock fan. None of the K series Intel CPUs from at least Haswell on came with fans. They all required aftermarket fans so either somebody else put one on there, or you put one on there, or it was a prebuilt and the builder put one on there, but it should use a stock fan because it is not capable of keeping it cool enough even at the default settings much less overclocked, regardless of whether the overclock is manual or automatic. There is a reason Intel didn't put a stock cooler in the box with these processors and that reason is that the stock cooler cannot handle the boost performance of those CPUs OR handle overclocked TDP.
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
Leo, his screenshot shows the 4790K (88 Watts TDP) at 89.7 Watts which is 102% TDP and is expected at stock settings. Since he re-TIM'd a month ago, it's likely the 95 Watt TDP stock cooler has a loose push-pin. Also, ambient temperature hasn't been mentioned.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I mentioned that, that the cooler probably came loose in one spot earlier, and they said no, it's not. But I agree, that was my first inclination. Probably needs to be double or triple checked.

Even so, like I said, that CPU never came with a stock cooler, so it doesn't have the correct cooler to begin with right?

Likely he has a cooler from a 4790 instead which doesn't have the same boost TDP as the 4790k.
 

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