Question Good PSU for i7-7700?

Aug 3, 2019
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So, I have a cooler master 500w PSU. I have an i7-7700 and a GIGABYTE GTX 1060 6GB. I'm wondering what PSU would be good for me if I wanted to re-enable intel turbo boost? I disabled it as I thought 500w (456 on the 12v rail) might be too low for that.
 
the i7-7700 is but a 65W TDP CPU...and per Nvidia, the 1060 (6 GB) is a 120 watt peak card...(Nvidia recommends minimum 400 watt PSU)

As you have a discrete GPU in the GTX1060 class, a 500-600 watt is more than fine...(I like having PSUs running at only 50-60% of rated capacity, truth be told)
 
Reactions: SaltyDrink
Aug 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
the i7-7700 is but a 65W TDP CPU...and per Nvidia, the 1060 (6 GB) is a 120 watt peak card...(Nvidia recommends minimum 400 watt PSU)

As you have a discrete GPU in the GTX1060 class, a 500-600 watt is more than fine...(I like having PSUs running at only 50-60% of rated capacity, truth be told)
Ah, okay. Should turbo be safe to use or should I just keep it disabled?
 
We are talking components that shouldn't draw much more than 200 watts from the PSU under load, even with turbo boost enabled on the CPU, so I have to agree that the existing power supply is probably fine enough, even if it's not a "great" model. It's not going to be running anywhere near its advertised maximum capacity at the very least, and there are lots of pre-built systems that run more power-hungry hardware on weaker PSUs than that. If the system has been running fine without turbo boost enabled, the small increase in power draw from enabling it on that processor isn't likely to make any significant difference as far as the PSU is concerned.

Now, a better PSU might potentially handle failure better, and could possibly reduce the chances other hardware getting damaged in the event of the unit failing, but it shouldn't be a requirement as far as running these components to their full potential is concerned.
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
This is the problem - it's not about "good enough" it's about risk mitigation on what happens if something goes wrong.

Honestly, as much as it might be a pain, we don't recommend more expensive PSUs because we want you to spend more money or for "FPS".

You really do need to spend more. Cheap PSUs use lower grade OEM manufacturers and use cheap components which risk the safety of your other components. And the last thing you should scrimp on, is the component that literally provides direct power to your entire system.

Cheap PSUs = Cheap Components = Risk to your rig.

If a PSU blows and takes out other components (which Cheap PSUs often do) - any warranty you have will not cover the rest of your components.

Honestly you can spend a little bit now, and potentially run the risk of this happening, or save for a bit, and pay for a PSU knowing it comes with a better warranty and protects the rest of your PC should worst case happens. We have a common saying:

“Despite whatever money you save on a cheap PSU now, it will cost you more when it fails later”
We say so because the last thing we would want is for you to pay this money anyway, for it to damage other components, getting a good quality PSU means you can rest knowing the PSU should work for the next few years without issue. And it really does pay to save and get a good quality unit. It's your system we care about, it seems irritating I know and I hope this is read with the sincerity I intend, I just would never want you to suffer damaging your own system, as we see it all too often:)

It's not about if the system draws more power, I have seen many PSUs work fine for years, then suddenly blow, some even burst into flames, and the Elite series are probably the worst Cooler Master have to offer that aren't really made for gaming higher load systems.
 
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PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
As for alternative PSUs there are plenty, but if you're looking for one that is very budget friendly and still good quality, look at the Corsair CX series for example. There are better PSUs definitely, but it's usually the best value for quality you can get, and still decent quality. If you wish, I can list a bunch of recommendations too.
 

j121

Notable
Nov 9, 2017
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i was just going to order some cx series 450w , i can see this is made by two different manufacturers. Any way to tell them apart ? sorry for hijacking
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
Yes that's the correct 2017 version Corsair CX model.
He's asking if there's a way to know if the OEM is Great Wall or CWT by looking at an internet listing of the PSU (as opposed to looking at the PSU itself).

The answer is no.

The difference in noise between the two is negligible and is only at full load.

If you want a PSU that's so quiet that you're willing to hunt down a PSU made by a particular OEM, then you should buy a PSU that's actually engineered to be a quiet PSU. Seriously.
 
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FALC0N

Splendid
i was just going to order some cx series 450w , i can see this is made by two different manufacturers. Any way to tell them apart ? sorry for hijacking
There is, but not before purchasing. One reason I'm not as high on the CX as some. I like to know what I am getting.

Now if you are talking about the "old" CX, they have different colored labels.
 
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