rayvis

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I am thinking about building and selling high end computers. I have a build put together right now that I think is at a good price. Just wanted more input.

AMD Phenom II 940 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Black Edition
8 GB DDR2 800 Ram
Lite-On 22x DVD/CD Burner
WD 640 GB 7200 RPM SATA Hard Drive 16 MB Cache
Dual Sapphire ATi Radeon 4850
22" Acer LCD Display
Microsoft Laser Desktop 4000
Creative Inspire 2.1 Speakers
Internal All-In-One Card Reader
Windows Vista Home Premium (64 Bit)
Apevia X-Supra Case
550W Power Supply

I'm looking at selling this computer for $2000

The price includes free in home setup for local customers and 2 year replacement on parts.

It seems pretty comparable to the new Dell XPS 625 which uses the same Phenom II.
 

theAnimal

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I'd highly recommend not using this one. It has very low 12V watts for a 550W PSU (only 420) and I don't think it's suited for a quad core with 2 4850s.

BFG LS550, Corsair VX550 or OCZ Fatal1ty 550 would be much better choices.
 
It's a good build, but at $2000 it might be hard to sell IMO. What does it cost you, $1300, $1400? You deserve to be paid for your knowledge and your work, but an extra $600 will scare off potential buyers, especially in the current economy.

Also, if you want to call it high-end you need HD 4870 cards. The HD 4850 is not even in the top 10 any more and it could hurt your sales.

I'd put a 650W PSU in there, even if you stick with HD 4850 cards. 550W is the minimum recommended for HD 4850 Crossfire, and your customers will be annoyed if you leave no room for adding hard drives and TV tuners and whatever.

I have no idea about the Apevia X-Supra. Keep in mind that some customers love cases with bling and lights (Antec 900, NZXT Tempest) while others hate lights and would prefer something plain black (RC-690). If you give them a choice it might help.

Make sure support is detailed in the contracts. For example, are you supposed to go to the customer's place and reinstall Windows if they mess it up? For free? For how many years after the build is delivered?

The WD6401AALS (WD 640GB 32MB cache) is about $5 more than the 16MB version. 32MB cache looks better than 16MB in an ad, and there's a 10% speed improvement.
 
Oops, I hadn't seen that Rosewill PSU. Yeah, get a Corsair 650TX (for HD 4850 Crossfire) or 750TX (for HD 4870 Crossfire). It will avoid a lot of support headaches for yourself, and it looks better in the ad too.
 

rayvis

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Thanks for the replies so far. This is just a project I've been tinkering with since I haven't been able to find a job in a while. I love building computers so I thought maybe I could make some money with it.

The total cost of the build with extra warranty included is about $1500.

I'm going to tinker a bit more and see about upgrading a few parts and post my new updated build idea in a few minutes.
 

rayvis

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Ok, I upgraded the Power Supply, video cards, Ram, and the hard drive. Some of the parts I picked were hastily added just to get an idea, hard drive included. I didn't even really look at all the hard drives. Anyway, the build now is as follows with the upgrades at the bottom.

AMD Phenom II 940 3.0 GHz Quad-Core Black Edition
Lite-On 22x DVD/CD Burner
22" Acer LCD Display
Microsoft Laser Desktop 4000
Creative Inspire 2.1 Speakers
Internal All-In-One Card Reader
Windows Vista Home Premium (64 Bit)
Apevia X-Supra Case

8 GB DDR2 1066 Ram
WD 640 GB 7200 RPM 32 MB Cache Hard Drive
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136319

Dual Sapphire Radeon HD 4870 1 GB GDDR5 cards
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102801

Corsair 750TX
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

This setup seems alot nicer. However, it puts me really close to $2000. How much profit would you guys suggest on a system so I can reprice accordingly?
 
That is a very impressive machine.

Maybe 4GB of RAM would be enough. Read this article and decide for yourself.
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2008/07/08/is-more-memory-better/1

I would add $150 just for the hassle of selecting parts and ordering them, and for the hardware building.

I'm assuming you will also install Vista and find the latest drivers - let's say $50 for that.

I would throw in 2 days of free testing (memtest86, prime95, maybe a game if you have one that supports Crossfire and doesn't come with SecuROM or whatever - so you can install it on every machine and play it for a few hours and then uninstall it).

Support should probably be discussed (and paid for) separately.

Are you good at overclocking? If yes, some people might be willing to pay extra for it. I've seen ads where the same CPU+MB+RAM combo was $100 more when overclocked.
 

xthekidx

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I'd say $2200 sounds about right. Then offer warranty and overclocking separately for an additional charge. You might also offer customizing options, namely with the GPU's, maybe get a few different varieties...Some people are very Pro ATI or Nvidia and you may expand your target market that way.
 

rayvis

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So around $2200 without warranty?
 
Yeah, I guess...

Maybe you should try advertising these services:
1. discuss customer's needs, figure out the optimal configuration, order parts, build, install OS/drivers - say, $200
2. overclocking (optional) $100
3. support $?

Of course, before you order parts you and the customer go to Newegg's site and see how much the thing will cost.

I'm worried that you'll invest in a certain PC first, perfect for gaming but not ideal for other things, and then you'll have difficulty finding a person who wants that exact configuration. It's safer to find a customer first. It should be easier too, because then you'd have more flexibility - not just gamers. Also, like xthekids pointed out, if a customer insists on Intel/AMD, ATI/nVidia, Asus/Gigabyte etc, it's best to know before you order.
 

rayvis

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I had already came to the conclusion that I'm going to build my computers to order. Sure, it'll take a few days to get the parts and a couple more to get everything set up and tested, but it's still better than ordering from dell and having to wait 2-3 weeks for the computer to ship.

I'm looking into some other options as not everyone is a gamer. It's just easiest to compete with the likes of Dell and other companies with higher end computers.

I'd once again like to thank everyone that has replied for the advice given. And if you or anyone else has any other ideas, post them for me. When I figure out some more build options, I'll post them for everyone to see as well.