Google Offers Most Lucrative Salary to Software Engineers

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lathe26

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... but what are these salaries at once cost of living is factored in? It's foolish to switch jobs to get a 25% raise if housing cost 2x as much.
 

richarduk

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I've been a software engineer for 20 years and worked for many top companies and have never met someone who has received that kind of money. I expect they are factoring share options and other 'not real money' extras like free phones. Think about it, 1000 software engineers would draw 128 million, and I bet they have more than a 1000 software engineers!
 

rahulkadukar

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You are a poor software engineer. Top companies (b**** please), if you really have worked for top companies then you are very poor. I have 3 years of work experience and in one more year I will be drawing close to 75% of what is advertised here
 

boiler1990

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[citation][nom]richarduk[/nom]I've been a software engineer for 20 years and worked for many top companies and have never met someone who has received that kind of money. I expect they are factoring share options and other 'not real money' extras like free phones. Think about it, 1000 software engineers would draw 128 million, and I bet they have more than a 1000 software engineers![/citation]

It always includes benefits. I'm betting true base salary is in the 50-70k range, depending on experience.
 

Genny

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[citation][nom]boiler1990[/nom]It always includes benefits. I'm betting true base salary is in the 50-70k range, depending on experience.[/citation]

Really doubt it. 50-70k would be pathetically low for a software engineer at one of these companies. 125k sounds a lot more reasonable.
 

cknobman

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[citation][nom]richarduk[/nom]I've been a software engineer for 20 years and worked for many top companies and have never met someone who has received that kind of money. I expect they are factoring share options and other 'not real money' extras like free phones. Think about it, 1000 software engineers would draw 128 million, and I bet they have more than a 1000 software engineers![/citation]

Not sure where you have been working but I have.

I live in Texas and am a .Net software engineer for a company that is nowhere near a "top" company and I make over $105,000 base salary per year. That does not include cost of benefits, company phone, bonuses (which I do get), laptop, etc.......

I have been in the field since 2005 and here in my region I dont know anyone that would go work somewhere for less than 90k and even that is cutting it pretty close. Only exception to this would be the really sh!tty developers that are not work their salt.
 

djscribbles

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[citation][nom]rahulkadukar[/nom]You are a poor software engineer. Top companies (b**** please), if you really have worked for top companies then you are very poor. I have 3 years of work experience and in one more year I will be drawing close to 75% of what is advertised here[/citation]

Because compensation and ability are always well aligned. Also keep in mind that your first few years are often the largest growth, as you prove you are actually capable of contributing.

As others have pointed out, cost of living is a big deal. You may make that much because you are in an expensive area, not because you are any better than anyone else.
Job mobility is another big factor, Google pays more because it's engineers could jump to Facebook at the drop of a hat; the same can be true anywhere, if there is a lot of demand in a region, salaries are going to be higher, regardless of individual ability.

Lastly, you probably couldn't be more of an _ _ _ if you tried. Way to jump to conclusions about someone you don't know anything about other than salary.
 

heisenberg01

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I have worked at Microsoft and currently at Amazon. I can tell you for a fact that ~90k base and ~15-20k bonus is normal for new hires. After 3-5 years (what I assume is close to the overall average pay) you can expect 110-130k base and 25k-40k bonus with the top 5-10% making much higher. Silicon Valley is at least 10% higher due to CA state taxes and cost of living.
 

kronos_cornelius

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Imagine Shakira or Black Eyed Peas getting paid $120,000 for their songs lyrics. They make millions you say, so all these companies make billions of their programmers which means $120,000 is peanuts to them.

Instead of selling your code (songs) why not retain the license to your code, create an organization that allows for fair trade of source code among developers/entrepreneurs, and then we will all have 7 figure salaries.

Google is kind, but they are not paying those salaries out of the goodness of their heart. The people they hire are very talented and are the most likely people to know the software market is ripe for product ideas.

I think people overestimate the effort to create your own company and sale innovative products ( customers are more forgiving to innovative products because they had to live without them previously ). And the sky is the limit in term of what you can make ($) if you do this.

Not saying everybody should do this. But if more people did this, it would increase the salaries of every developer even more !

We should be in a time of exponential growth in productivity... don't let all that growth go to rich people, your human capital is the precious commodity of this century.
 
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richarduk: You're obviously not Google or Facebook calibre or we wouldn't be having this conversation with you. 2nd, the companies you work for, the actual product you develop, and the city you live in will be a huge factor, and if you possessed a shred of genius to go with that 20 years of experience, nobody would have to tell you that.

Back on topic, I'm shocked that the average for those companies is only $120-something-k a year. I already make that about that much, my plans were to eventually wind up at Google someday making $200k/yr. They only take the very best of the best, who I assumed all make way more than $120k/yr. I actually was recruited by them when I was a relative n00b, and basically petered out at step 3 (out of 8 or 10?) of the Google interview process, predictably so considering I was relatively inexperienced, have never written a book about Linux or Python, and don't have an Ivy League education...

 

A Bad Day

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What was that one software company that mandated its employees, including senior programmers, to work way more than 12 hours a day without overtime pay?
 

koga73

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just wanted to point out that all of the cool things that google has like sleeping pods is because their employees never leave the office :p
 
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I make $125k/year + bonus. I live in Denver. I have a friend that lives in Austin that makes $160k/year. I am pretty sure that the software engineers at our customer make as much as I do. When I was a contractor I was making $220-300k/year depending on the year.
 

gm0n3y

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[citation][nom]house70[/nom]Throw in the nice working conditions they have and you got a winner.[/citation]
Nice living conditions are necessary when you are working 60+ hours a week. Seriously, the money is nice, but getting worked to the bone gets old. I left a job making close to those rates for one making ~$80k but 'only' ~45 hours a week. My previous job making ~$110k averaged around 55-60 hours per week. It was rare that I actually got 2 days off on the weekend. And most of the time you aren't allowed to take even 2 weeks of vacation per year. The problem is that there is so much demand that companies have trouble finding competent people.
 

mig754

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[citation][nom]gm0n3y[/nom]Nice living conditions are necessary when you are working 60+ hours a week. Seriously, the money is nice, but getting worked to the bone gets old. I left a job making close to those rates for one making ~$80k but 'only' ~45 hours a week. My previous job making ~$110k averaged around 55-60 hours per week. It was rare that I actually got 2 days off on the weekend. And most of the time you aren't allowed to take even 2 weeks of vacation per year. The problem is that there is so much demand that companies have trouble finding competent people.[/citation]

If there's so much demand that companies like MS, Google or FB are forced to pay $100k (bonuses and stock options included, before taxes) to inexperienced college graduates (they are, I've turned down an offer from one of those companies), then how can anyone be forced to work overtime? If companies are willing to pay so much for good developers, then they should also be willing to allow them to 'only' work 40 hours a week, for fear of people quitting because of the unbearable working conditions.

On another note, there's something SERIOUSLY wrong with the world if people like me can just go to the States and make upwards of $100k/year doing something that is, frankly, easy and pleasant, and at the same time (some of) my compatriots break their backs doing exhausing physical labor and only get about $4k/yr...
 

Kami3k

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[citation][nom]mig754[/nom]If there's so much demand that companies like MS, Google or FB are forced to pay $100k (bonuses and stock options included, before taxes) to inexperienced college graduates (they are, I've turned down an offer from one of those companies), then how can anyone be forced to work overtime? If companies are willing to pay so much for good developers, then they should also be willing to allow them to 'only' work 40 hours a week, for fear of people quitting because of the unbearable working conditions.On another note, there's something SERIOUSLY wrong with the world if people like me can just go to the States and make upwards of $100k/year doing something that is, frankly, easy and pleasant, and at the same time (some of) my compatriots break their backs doing exhausing physical labor and only get about $4k/yr...[/citation]

It's called an education. Physical labor requires you to not be mentally retarded.
 

mig754

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[citation][nom]Kami3k[/nom]It's called an education. Physical labor requires you to not be mentally retarded.[/citation]
Not that I would agree with it, but don't you rather mean the opposite? You can do moderately well as an e.g. delivery guy even if you're retarded, whereas e.g. programming does require a lot of education (albeit technical as opposed to liberal) and a sharp mind.
 
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