Google Says Faster Chromebooks On The Way

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Wave Fusion

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I thought the chief issue with these machines was that they are just paperweights without internet access.
It wouldn't for example, let you go to a hotel wi-fi splash login screen because of related issues..
 

razor512

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people still use chrome books?

I don't see how they could have ever thought they would be successful. What google essentially did was take a netbook, install a less functional Os compared to windows, then charge twice as much for the netbook.
 

tupz

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Yep. I still use my CR48. It's great. It's for the user that knows how to utilize "the cloud" properly. It'll catch on as time goes on.
 

sixdegree

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Google should learn a thing or two from Apple about mobile pc design. They should make it thinner, shinier, put chrome logo in the middle of the lid in chrome/silver, and call it Chrome Air. Good design sells.
 

JOSHSKORN

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[citation][nom]Razor512[/nom]people still use chrome books?I don't see how they could have ever thought they would be successful. What google essentially did was take a netbook, install a less functional Os compared to windows, then charge twice as much for the netbook.[/citation]
You're thinking of Apple.

OK maybe both.
 
G

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The pricing decision rather than speed has been the main complaint. Sure there are lots of nerds on blogs like this who have never actually used a Chromebook who complain about the speed - or rather the poor speed you would get on it if you ran Windows on it (and which you do with Windows netbooks). However if you look at the comments from people who have actually bought Chromebooks and used them (for example the Amazon customer reviews), speed isn't a complaint, and in fact they feel it is fast and snappy. The reason of course is that Chromebooks are fast and responsive - if you run ChromeOS on it since the only thing that runs on it is a web browser, but painfully slow (a la Windows netbook) if you run Windows. The only exception to this is Flash which is poorly maintained and doesn't seem to be properly accelerated, but then again the same would apply to a Windows netbook. The people who buy Chromebooks buy it mainly for Internet browsing, webmail, and occasional Doc apps and don't spend their time running Flash games, so speed isn't a problem for them.

This is all changing now, because of the emergence of Native Client applications and games. These are rapidly being ported to run on Chrome, and bring local applications to Chromebooks. Pretty well any desktop game or application written in any programming language can be ported to Native Client - CAD programs, photo editors, video and audio editors, media players without hardware acceleration - the sort of applications that could never run in a web browser before. This is a game changer for Chrome and Chromebooks, and Chromebooks are going to need more powerful processors as well as better graphics and media acceleration to handle this. This is the reason, rather than customer complaints, that Chromebooks is getting faster cpus, plus the fact that lower production numbers for Atoms may mean that the price advantage of Atoms may not be that attractive, although the longer battery life advantage remains.

The thing about the Chromebook is that it has never seriously been marketed to the consumer, although those who are in the know do see a big potential. Microsoft has started it's patent cartel licensing extortion scam to cover Chromebooks as well Android - a sure sign that Microsoft considers Chromebooks to be a serious threat to Windows. Dixons, UK's largest consumer electronic chain, made a statement that one in ten computers sold could be Chromebooks by end of 2012 if they are properly marketed. Whether Google will do this or not remains to be seen. Google is pushing Android for the consumer market, and so far Chromebooks have only being marketed aggressively sold to education, libraries, and businesses with server based IT systems eg. help desks, information terminals etc. The outlets, pricing and spec of Chromebooks are part of this. Consumers need to try before they buy, especially on something as revolutionary as Chromebooks, but Google only sells them on online retail outlets, and they have to pay a premium price for outright purchase. It is clear that Google sees these sales only as a means of making Chromebooks available to early adopters to try out before larger education or business rollouts, rather than mass market sales. The specs are also not intended for the consumer market. The build quality is high, and battery life gets priority over minimising cost or games performance, which is essential in schools or businesses where reliability, ruggedness, and long battery life are important, and games and video media consumption less so, but not ideal for a consumer device.

Tom's Hardware is by definition nerd central, and it is not surprising that the posters seem completely clueless about the real selling point of Chromebooks. Chromebooks are ZERO MAINTENANCE DEVICES. They are for people who don't want to spend time on maintaining or learning how to configure Windows, troubleshoot hardware, updating the OS or applications, installing apps, etc. They just want to switch on the computer and use it. This is the complete opposite of what any self respecting nerd - myself included - buys a computer for. Nerds want to hack the hardware, the OS, tweak and overclock everything there is to be tweaked to squeeze out every last benchmark score point, install and run applications they are never actually going to use for real productive use, just to prove that the computer can run it etc. This is why they buy computers, and this is what their enjoyment of computers is all about. The thing is that most consumers consumers of computers nowadays aren't nerds and want a computer free of the maintenance hassles and user learning curve associated with Windows. Chromebooks have proved successful in school trials precisely because they are zero maintenance, and they have proved to be viable for large scale deployment in schools where Windows was not because they can operate without a desktop support IT team and without teachers wasting time on desktop support and maintenance instead of teaching. The same benefits apply to the vast majority of consumers who buy computers, and if Google's own nerds (and Google is basically an all nerd company) can get its heads out of the nerd mentality, Chromebooks will be a huge consumer success. What we need is a cheap ARM based Raspberry Pi (perhaps with a dual processor) SOC selling for $100 or so, or a $35 Raspberry Pi board built into or as a plug in option for every TV or high end monitor, so it can be used as a standalone Internet terminal or thin client for RDP, or Citrix.
 

billybobser

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Can't imagine anyone just wants to use the web.
They would certainly need the typical office apps (which would be compatible with the mainstream).

Not to mention, if that is all they offered, I'd like some superduper battery life/awesome wifi/4g.

Else it'd just be a tacky notebook, which would be pretty useless if no internet was available (we don't all live in S.Korea)
 

computernerdforlife

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+1 534564

Usually long posted are from: morons, people on medicine making them type, kids, religious nuts,... 534564 has proven that a long post can be full of VALID opinions and facts.
 

selden

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534564 summarized things well, although I'm not sure I agree about an ARM processor, let alone the Raspberry Pi approach. In the past year, benchmark performance on my Cr-48 have improved by about 15%, but the main improvements have been in stability and functionality. The people who equate Chromebook pricing with netbook pricing are missing a number of features, such as a larger screen, 2 gb of RAM, 3G radio (with 24 months of free data), long battery life, and cool running. Not to mention avoiding the hassles of Windows.

I set up a new HP laptop for a friend last summer, a task that took the better part of an entire day downloading and applying updates, as well as ripping out the crapware that shipped with it. Two weeks ago, a virus wiped out her files, which she (of course) hadn't backed up. The place she bought it from charged her $130 to recover her data. Two years ago, I installed Linux Mint on her netbook. Not only does she prefer Mint because it's so much faster (her words) on a netbook with an Atom processor and 1 gb of RAM than Windows on an AMD processor with 4gb of RAM, but she has been keeping it current for two years without ever asking for my help. Chrome OS requires even less maintenance.
 

d-isdumb

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[citation][nom]tupz[/nom]Yep. I still use my CR48. It's great. It's for the user that knows how to utilize "the cloud" properly. It'll catch on as time goes on.[/citation]
Don't trust Google (in bed with Obama) or the Cloud, which is giving full control of your computer over to big brother/industry. Would like to have one of the new ones for a Ubuntu rig if the memory/storage is big enough.
 

d-isdumb

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@534564
"They are for people who don't want to spend time on maintaining or learning how to configure Windows, troubleshoot hardware, updating the OS or applications, installing apps, etc. They just want to switch on the computer and use it."
Agree, but Apple does that already. People are getting more stupid instead of smarter too. They can't find their way around the block now without their smart phone telling them how.
 

del35

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d-isdumb: Agree, but Apple does that already. People are getting more stupid instead of smarter too. They can't find their way around the block now without their smart phone telling them how.
True, but Apple's is more about ripping off and caging the user, and their laptops are too expensive for what they are. You can pickup a Chromebook for under $500 US. Probably 95 percent of the Church of iCrap sheeple would be better off using Chromebooks. But iCrappies are also fond of the air of coolness that all the billions of dollars Apple spends on advertising falsely bestows on them... So they might have issues with moving on to a purely functional no-nonsense device designed with the technologically illiterate person in mind.
 

madooo12

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[citation][nom]534564[/nom]The pricing decision rather than speed has been the main complaint. Sure there are lots of nerds on blogs like this who have never actually used a Chromebook who complain about the speed - or rather the poor speed you would get on it if you ran Windows on it (and which you do with Windows netbooks). However if you look at the comments from people who have actually bought Chromebooks and used them (for example the Amazon customer reviews), speed isn't a complaint, and in fact they feel it is fast and snappy. The reason of course is that Chromebooks are fast and responsive - if you run ChromeOS on it since the only thing that runs on it is a web browser, but painfully slow (a la Windows netbook) if you run Windows. The only exception to this is Flash which is poorly maintained and doesn't seem to be properly accelerated, but then again the same would apply to a Windows netbook. The people who buy Chromebooks buy it mainly for Internet browsing, webmail, and occasional Doc apps and don't spend their time running Flash games, so speed isn't a problem for them.This is all changing now, because of the emergence of Native Client applications and games. These are rapidly being ported to run on Chrome, and bring local applications to Chromebooks. Pretty well any desktop game or application written in any programming language can be ported to Native Client - CAD programs, photo editors, video and audio editors, media players without hardware acceleration - the sort of applications that could never run in a web browser before. This is a game changer for Chrome and Chromebooks, and Chromebooks are going to need more powerful processors as well as better graphics and media acceleration to handle this. This is the reason, rather than customer complaints, that Chromebooks is getting faster cpus, plus the fact that lower production numbers for Atoms may mean that the price advantage of Atoms may not be that attractive, although the longer battery life advantage remains. The thing about the Chromebook is that it has never seriously been marketed to the consumer, although those who are in the know do see a big potential. Microsoft has started it's patent cartel licensing extortion scam to cover Chromebooks as well Android - a sure sign that Microsoft considers Chromebooks to be a serious threat to Windows. Dixons, UK's largest consumer electronic chain, made a statement that one in ten computers sold could be Chromebooks by end of 2012 if they are properly marketed. Whether Google will do this or not remains to be seen. Google is pushing Android for the consumer market, and so far Chromebooks have only being marketed aggressively sold to education, libraries, and businesses with server based IT systems eg. help desks, information terminals etc. The outlets, pricing and spec of Chromebooks are part of this. Consumers need to try before they buy, especially on something as revolutionary as Chromebooks, but Google only sells them on online retail outlets, and they have to pay a premium price for outright purchase. It is clear that Google sees these sales only as a means of making Chromebooks available to early adopters to try out before larger education or business rollouts, rather than mass market sales. The specs are also not intended for the consumer market. The build quality is high, and battery life gets priority over minimising cost or games performance, which is essential in schools or businesses where reliability, ruggedness, and long battery life are important, and games and video media consumption less so, but not ideal for a consumer device. Tom's Hardware is by definition nerd central, and it is not surprising that the posters seem completely clueless about the real selling point of Chromebooks. Chromebooks are ZERO MAINTENANCE DEVICES. They are for people who don't want to spend time on maintaining or learning how to configure Windows, troubleshoot hardware, updating the OS or applications, installing apps, etc. They just want to switch on the computer and use it. This is the complete opposite of what any self respecting nerd - myself included - buys a computer for. Nerds want to hack the hardware, the OS, tweak and overclock everything there is to be tweaked to squeeze out every last benchmark score point, install and run applications they are never actually going to use for real productive use, just to prove that the computer can run it etc. This is why they buy computers, and this is what their enjoyment of computers is all about. The thing is that most consumers consumers of computers nowadays aren't nerds and want a computer free of the maintenance hassles and user learning curve associated with Windows. Chromebooks have proved successful in school trials precisely because they are zero maintenance, and they have proved to be viable for large scale deployment in schools where Windows was not because they can operate without a desktop support IT team and without teachers wasting time on desktop support and maintenance instead of teaching. The same benefits apply to the vast majority of consumers who buy computers, and if Google's own nerds (and Google is basically an all nerd company) can get its heads out of the nerd mentality, Chromebooks will be a huge consumer success. What we need is a cheap ARM based Raspberry Pi (perhaps with a dual processor) SOC selling for $100 or so, or a $35 Raspberry Pi board built into or as a plug in option for every TV or high end monitor, so it can be used as a standalone Internet terminal or thin client for RDP, or Citrix.[/citation]
chrome doesn't have graphics acceleration, it is quite slow even on the fastest overclocked processors

it may get it soon
 

p3t3or

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I have a first generation Google TV from Logitech Revue. I searched the internet to see if anyone has tried to upgrade the hardware inside because it too can be sluggish, especially when scrolling. Perhaps Tom's Hardware can look into homemade hardware upgrades?
 

runswindows95

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"Google Docs documents grind open," he told Pichai. "Scrolling can be an excruciatingly laggy affair. My son, trying to play the Flash-based Crush the Castle 2 game, cried out in exasperation when trying to construct his medieval defenses. Keyboard repeat rates aren't adjustable to let me set them fast enough with only a brief delay before kicking in. When I have more than 15 or 20 tabs open, it seems that old tabs must be reloaded from the server when I switch back to them."

That could be why it runs slows. Why do people need more than 10 tabs open at once? When I work, I have seven tabs open, and it drives me nuts. When I'm just doing personal stuff, three tabs max. That's it. If you're doing that much work at once, get a real computer. Netbooks /Chromebooks are designed for people who generally only have one tab open at a time (i.e Facebook, email, the everyday stuff).
 

UmeNNis

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[citation][nom]runswindows95[/nom]"Google Docs documents grind open," he told Pichai. "Scrolling can be an excruciatingly laggy affair. My son, trying to play the Flash-based Crush the Castle 2 game, cried out in exasperation when trying to construct his medieval defenses. Keyboard repeat rates aren't adjustable to let me set them fast enough with only a brief delay before kicking in. When I have more than 15 or 20 tabs open, it seems that old tabs must be reloaded from the server when I switch back to them."That could be why it runs slows. Why do people need more than 10 tabs open at once? When I work, I have seven tabs open, and it drives me nuts. When I'm just doing personal stuff, three tabs max. That's it. If you're doing that much work at once, get a real computer. Netbooks /Chromebooks are designed for people who generally only have one tab open at a time (i.e Facebook, email, the everyday stuff).[/citation]

Porn.

Seriously.
 

rocknrollz

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Chromebooks are not for the average user. If you enjoy applications, games, web-browsing. Just the everyday stuff, then a chromebook is not for you. Chromebooks are for people who "live" on the internet. And must have it whenever they need it, this could be from facebook junkies, to serious business people who really need internet ASAP.

I think that chromebooks are very cool. Owning one (borrowing more like it) for a month really showed me that it had potential. The current ones on the market are decent, but not something I would go out and buy. Hopefully this new gen will bring something different.
 

alextheblue

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[citation][nom]Razor512[/nom]people still use chrome books?I don't see how they could have ever thought they would be successful. What google essentially did was take a netbook, install a less functional Os compared to windows, then charge twice as much for the netbook.[/citation]
No doubt! The article even talks about dual boot... if you have a device with a legit Windows 8 preinstalled, why the heck would you want to dual boot to Chrome OS? Slower, less powerful, even more dependent on fast reliable internet wherever you go? No thanks.

If I had to use something other than Windows 8 on a next-gen mobile device, I would prefer some Linux flavor. That's a better alternative - and no, Android is not "Google Linux". It's Android. Just because they were lazy and decided to take some free code for themselves doesn't make it Linux. Also it's not truly open source, they drop code whenever they feel like it benefits them.[citation][nom]p3t3or[/nom]As far from my post, it is only one tab open. Having two tabs open isn't very easily navigable on Google TV.[/citation]Evidence that Google TV is useless for web browsing. As for upgrades, you're screwed. The hardware is all fixed, it would be like trying to replace a phone processor - good luck finding a faster drop-in replacement, and good luck actually desoldering/soldering during installation. Maybe someone will find a way to overclock it a bit without a significant increase in heat - but there's probably not a lot of interest in these things from the kinds of enthusiasts that would bother.[citation][nom]runswindows95[/nom]Why do people need more than 10 tabs open at once? When I work, I have seven tabs open, and it drives me nuts. When I'm just doing personal stuff, three tabs max. That's it. If you're doing that much work at once, get a real computer. Netbooks /Chromebooks are designed for people who generally only have one tab open at a time (i.e Facebook, email, the everyday stuff).[/citation]You're seriously defending Chromebooks here? I have tons of tabs open all the time. A modern machine is worthless if it can't handle that. Any time I'm on Tom's, I open a new tab for every article and review that looks interesting, that way they are loaded and ready to go. Saves time, and means I can navigate away from the main page and all the articles I cared to open are waiting for me whenever I want. If I had to open each one, and go back, and then open the next one, it'd take forever. Heck for Wiki-type sites, this applies even more! A lot of times I'm reading an article and I want to be able to hop back and forth between sections, open tabs on linked subjects for further reading later, etc.

Before tabbed browsing, I was using quite a few seperate browser instances to do the same thing. Tabs are just better and easier.

Chromebook: It looks like a laptop, it feels like a laptop... but it's dog-slow, useless, and smoked by even entry-level laptops that cost about the same. I mean really, in a small form factor you can get a netbook with a C-60 and it would be better. If you want something bigger, a 15.6" with an E-450 is a huge step up and they start life under $400 still. Did I mention they have enough space for you to store stuff internally for access when you don't have good internet access?
 
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