Question GPU fans not spinning, GPU lights are on

May 1, 2019
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So not too long ago (maybe a month) I build this pc, and it worked all fine. One time I was playing CSGO with my friends and suddenly my pc crashed, the screen turned black and I couldn't do anything. After a while I decided to turn the pc off by holding down the power button and I started up the pc again. But when it was starting up, my monitor didn't pick up any signal from my GPU.
So now my GPU fans aren't spinning but the lights are on. When I try plugging my monitor into my motherboard i do get signal.

The GPU I have is a RX570
PSU: Corsair VS350
CPU: Ryzen 3 2200G
 
Corsair VS350
This might be the culprit, IMO. First off, this is an entry-level PSU model, and the minimum recommended for an RX 570 Rig is 450 Watts....Though, I'm not saying your power supply is causing all this, but tell me, does your card require any external PCI-e connector (6-pin), or it takes power via the PCI-e slot ?

Which exact Model is this, the RX570 ??
 
May 1, 2019
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This might be the culprit, IMO. First off, this is an entry-level PSU model, and the minimum recommended for an RX 570 Rig is 450 Watts....Though, I'm not saying your power supply is causing all this, but tell me, does your card require any external PCI-e connector (6-pin), or it takes power via the PCI-e slot ?

Which exact Model is this, the RX570 ??
https://www.amazon.com/Expedition-Radeon-Gaming-Graphics-EX-RX570-O8G/dp/B07BDT9HVN

It says that it's an ASUS Expedition Radeon RX570 8GB. And yes, it requires an external PCI-e connector.
 
Then kindly check whether the 6-PIN PCI-e cable is plugged properly. Remove the GPU from the PCI-e slot, and then reseat it back on that slot. Check for any dust settled as well. Can you try the card by using any other PSU model, to rule out whether the GPU is faulty or not ??

BTW that VS350 model from Corsair is a very low-end unit. Just a basic 80 plus WHITE unit. Not the very best in terms of quality, it also falls under the lower TIER in the PSU hierarchy.

And, the OEM of that unit is CWT/Channel Well Technology, I suppose.

I would definitely recommend you change/upgrade this unit for some other high-end PSU model, IF possible. Can you check your GPU on some other PC ? Doing this will narrow down the issue, and then we can come to some conclusion, as to whether the power supply unit is faulty, or the GPU itself.
 
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May 1, 2019
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Then kindly check whether the 6-PIN PCI-e cable is plugged properly. Remove the GPU from the PCI-e slot, and then reseat it back on that slot. Check for any dust settled as well. Can you try the card by using any other PSU model, to rule out whether the GPU is faulty or not ??

BTW that VS350 model from Corsair is a very low-end unit. Just a basic 80 plus WHITE unit. Not the very best in terms of quality, it also falls under the lower TIER in the PSU hierarchy.

And, the OEM of that unit is CWT/Channel Well Technology, I suppose.

I would definitely recommend you change/upgrade this unit for some other high-end PSU model, IF possible. Can you check your GPU on some other PC ? Doing this will narrow down the issue, and then we can come to some conclusion, as to whether the power supply unit is faulty, or the GPU itself.
I've already tried that and no good luck.
Since this is my first custom pc build, I don't really have extra parts I can test it with, so I think I'll just try and see if upgrading my PSU fixes it. And one last question, do you have any idea why the GPU did work for the time it was working (~1 month), even though I haven't replaced any parts in that period.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Take a stick and bend it. It'll bend a hundred times, right up to the point you put half an ounce more pressure on it, then it breaks. Your psu is the same way. For all intents and purposes the entire pc was pulling 349 watts for that entire month. The one time you get a massive explosion or firefight or crash and the pc pulls 351w, poof! There goes the psu.

Or.

Ohms law. Power = current x voltage. That psu was probably putting out 11.8v for the entire month, and the gpu was raising current (amperage) to get its 12v rated wattage necessary. Then, during a heavy gaming session, the psu is no longer putting out 11.8v, it's only putting out 11.6v as its stressed to the max or beyond. Gpu now draws more and more current to make the wattage. 1 of 3 things going to happen there. Either the psu 12v rail gets overloaded with current draw and shuts down (trips protections), psu 12v rail fails entirely (burns out) or some component on the gpu overheats due to excessive current draw and fries.

The psu is the cheapest to replace, but the gpu is the more obvious culprit as you get picture on mobo, which means the 12v rail is working.

Recommended wattage for psus is there for a reason, you can power a RTX2080ti on a 350w psu if it can adapter to the power connections. The problem is that you have absolutely no idea where the ceiling is and just how much power is necessary before the psu fails. Playing Russian Roulette with 7 bullets in an 8 shot pistol.

Underpowering a pc isn't a case of 'if' it will fail, but 'when'.
 
May 1, 2019
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So the PSU finally arrived (Corsair CX550) and I replugged everything back in, but the GPU is still not giving any signal to my monitor. What should I do now?
 

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