News Grab an Nvidia RTX 3080 GPU With $116 Off While It's Still In Stock: Real Deals

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
When "$116 off" equals "almost double MSRP". That's some "Real Deal" right there. >_>

How about don't grab an RTX 3080 until it's a lot closer to $699, the price it's supposed to be, not $1,320. I guess that doesn't make for a clickbait headline to encourage people to follow sponsored links for heavily marked-up products though.
It's the 3080 12GB card, which doesn't have an official MSRP but costs nearly as much as the 3080 Ti — and performs nearly as fast.
 

Heat_Fan89

Respectable
Jul 13, 2020
305
123
1,890
7
When "$116 off" equals "almost double MSRP". That's some "Real Deal" right there. >_>

How about don't grab an RTX 3080 until it's a lot closer to $699, the price it's supposed to be, not $1,320. I guess that doesn't make for a clickbait headline to encourage people to follow sponsored links for heavily marked-up products though.
I agree, it's a crappy deal especially with the new cards around the corner. You can also get a slightly better card for less directly from EVGA. $1299

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-4877-KL

And another card similar to the one Jarred posted is $1249 directly from EVGA

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-4865-KL

Personally for the same money as Jarred's deal you can get a real 3080Ti for $1329 directly from EVGA

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-3955-KR
 
It's the 3080 12GB card, which doesn't have an official MSRP but costs nearly as much as the 3080 Ti — and performs nearly as fast.
The original 3080 10GB, 3080 12GB, 3080 Ti, and 3090 all tend to perform roughly similar in games, without much more than a 10% difference between all of them. The 3090 was arguably overpriced at launch, unless one needed its extra VRAM for some professional non-gaming workload, or was willing to burn money without any care for value, filling the role of what would have once been marketed as "Titan" cards.

The newer 3080 models were largely redundant, thrown in for the sole purpose of giving Nvidia and the card manufacturers an excuse to drive up the MSRP of the 3080 to scalper-level pricing. The minor increase to performance and VRAM hardly justifies the massive increase in MSRP. I suppose it's arguably better to have the money going to the companies making the cards rather than resellers buying them up and selling them for a huge markup, but that doesn't make them any better value.
 
Mar 17, 2022
6
1
15
0
It's the 3080 12GB card, which doesn't have an official MSRP but costs nearly as much as the 3080 Ti — and performs nearly as fast.
EVGA lists the MSRP for the 'EVGA Nvidia RTX 3080 12GB XC3 Black Gaming' at $809.99: https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=10G-P5-3881-KL

If you tried posting this to Slickdeals you'd be laughed off the forum. If you were lucky, they'd ban you so you couldn't subject yourself to it a second time.

The only thing noteworthy about this is that the scalper selling this card has reduced their price by $112 and it's still priced at over 150% of MSRP.
 
EVGA lists the MSRP for the 'EVGA Nvidia RTX 3080 12GB XC3 Black Gaming' at $809.99: https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=10G-P5-3881-KL

If you tried posting this to Slickdeals you'd be laughed off the forum. If you were lucky, they'd ban you so you couldn't subject yourself to it a second time.

The only thing noteworthy about this is that the scalper selling this card has reduced their price by $112 and it's still priced at over 150% of MSRP.
You should probably read the model in the link you provided, its the 10gb model. Disinformation bad Mkay'?
 
Reactions: JarredWaltonGPU
Mar 17, 2022
6
1
15
0
They never said what was in the link was MSRP. Nvidia never gave an MSRP to venders for the 12gb model.
The specific SKU this thread relates to has an MSRP from the manufacturer, which is EVGA not Nvidia.

Nvidia provides the chipset and a reference design, they're not manufacturing boards for EVGA. That would be like saying Dell can't set an MSRP because Intel/AMD didn't provide one.

As much as it pains me to admit this, the founders edition MSRPs do not apply to anything but the founders edition cards.
 
Reactions: JarredWaltonGPU

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
I agree, it's a crappy deal especially with the new cards around the corner. You can also get a slightly better card for less directly from EVGA. $1299

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-4877-KL

And another card similar to the one Jarred posted is $1249 directly from EVGA

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-4865-KL

Personally for the same money as Jarred's deal you can get a real 3080Ti for $1329 directly from EVGA

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=12G-P5-3955-KR
Don't blame me! I'm not the ecomm deals writer. I was just pointing out that this is the 3080 12GB, which performs effectively at the same level as the 3080 Ti. For the same price, yes, I'd go with the 3080 Ti. Sometimes the ecomm powers get a bit too excited...
 

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
EVGA lists the MSRP for the 'EVGA Nvidia RTX 3080 12GB XC3 Black Gaming' at $809.99: https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=10G-P5-3881-KL

If you tried posting this to Slickdeals you'd be laughed off the forum. If you were lucky, they'd ban you so you couldn't subject yourself to it a second time.

The only thing noteworthy about this is that the scalper selling this card has reduced their price by $112 and it's still priced at over 150% of MSRP.
That's the 10GB card, again.

I hope you all realize that there are people working for Future, and by extension Tom's Hardware, that write up deals posts. That's their job. This isn't a great deal, but revising a post a day or two after the fact isn't really encouraged. I'll mention to the ecomm/deals people that our forum people are angry at the "crappy" deal, but virtually no 3080 10GB cards currently sell for under $1000. Most still sell for $1200, give or take. Linking to out of stock GPUs that have fantasy prices doesn't reflect reality.
 
Mar 17, 2022
1
2
15
0
Yeah, no thanks. I refuse to add to the problem by paying over retail. My 1080ti games fantastically at 2k 120hz and I am fine with this. I will skip this gen and get the next one when this mania is done.
I'm not sure what you're playing, but I'm not getting a solid 120, or even 60, on my 1080 in modern games at 1080 with graphics settings at levels I find acceptable. The lack of DLSS was the nail in the coffin for me. Now that it provides truly meaningful performance benefits at high quality and is being adopted I just can't keep going with subpar performance. I'm going to eBay it for $350 - $400 to offset only being able to find a 3080ti at MSRP.

It even struggles at upscaling in MadVR to 4K in some content. Those frame drops are annoying.

The fact my 4-5 year old GPU is still worth that much is absurd. With the continued supply chain disruptions (yay COVID and war) IF I can snag a 4080/4090 I'll likely be able to sell my 3080ti that's arriving today for a fair bit, meaning I'm taking a very minimal loss because my current GPU should be darn near worthless. If the market corrects a 3080ti will at least have some value.

I just can't bank on being able to get future hardware reliably anymore. I've got a 5 year old GPU worth way more than it should be and a Mustang that's worth more than I paid for it 2 years ago. Up is down, left is right.
 
The specific SKU this thread relates to has an MSRP from the manufacturer, which is EVGA not Nvidia.

Nvidia provides the chipset and a reference design, they're not manufacturing boards for EVGA. That would be like saying Dell can't set an MSRP because Intel/AMD didn't provide one.

As much as it pains me to admit this, the founders edition MSRPs do not apply to anything but the founders edition cards.
Nvidia is the manufacturer of the chips that go into the cards and their own cards they put the chips in. Venders only put them on boards with at least minimum specifications set by Nvidia, and slap their branding and cooler on it. Nvidia controls venders to the point that they have little to no control over the base pricing of their custom versions of the cards. To assert that the venders are the manufacturers implies they have control over the product they are "making" when in reality nothing goes to market without Nvidia's approval.
 

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
Nvidia is the manufacturer of the chips that go into the cards and their own cards they put the chips in. Venders only put them on boards with at least minimum specifications set by Nvidia, and slap their branding and cooler on it. Nvidia controls venders to the point that they have little to no control over the base pricing of their custom versions of the cards. To assert that the venders are the manufacturers implies they have control over the product they are "making" when in reality nothing goes to market without Nvidia's approval.
Nvidia does not set the MSRP for custom cards, and in fact after the original supply agreements were over, I'm sure Nvidia changed the future agreements WRT pricing. So GPUs that have an MSRP of $1200 for the 3080 Ti FE, and "undefined" for the 3080 12GB, most likely cost the AIC companies more than the 3080 10GB. And Nvidia has a new SKU not tied into the original $699 3080 10GB, which means it can negotiate different prices.

Bottom line: Until the shortages and supply chain issues are well and truly over (and most likely not until 3-6 months after that time), only Nvidia is selling GPUs at its MSRPs for the Founders Edition cards, and then only in limited quantity. And stuff like the Best Buy restocks doesn't help anyone, since probably 80% of people in line (if not more) are just scalpers or their agents trying to get cards. I went to a BB restock event just for kicks, and even with casual questioning of people at the front of the line, it was extremely obvious that many of them had no interest in actually using the GPUs they were buying but were just going to put them up on eBay or wherever. And those who weren't planning to resell the cards were very likely planning to mine with them, since this was six months ago.
 
Nvidia does not set the MSRP for custom cards, and in fact after the original supply agreements were over, I'm sure Nvidia changed the future agreements WRT pricing. So GPUs that have an MSRP of $1200 for the 3080 Ti FE, and "undefined" for the 3080 12GB, most likely cost the AIC companies more than the 3080 10GB. And Nvidia has a new SKU not tied into the original $699 3080 10GB, which means it can negotiate different prices.

Bottom line: Until the shortages and supply chain issues are well and truly over (and most likely not until 3-6 months after that time), only Nvidia is selling GPUs at its MSRPs for the Founders Edition cards, and then only in limited quantity. And stuff like the Best Buy restocks doesn't help anyone, since probably 80% of people in line (if not more) are just scalpers or their agents trying to get cards. I went to a BB restock event just for kicks, and even with casual questioning of people at the front of the line, it was extremely obvious that many of them had no interest in actually using the GPUs they were buying but were just going to put them up on eBay or wherever. And those who weren't planning to resell the cards were very likely planning to mine with them, since this was six months ago.
Since Nvidia, the manufacturer of the chips, sells them at a cost likely within the vast majority of the total cost of the venders end products, isn't it fair to say that even though Nvidia is not selling EVGAs cards that they have unfettered contribution to the price of EVGA's cards and thus basically control the minimum costs for their cards? From what I have learned, Nvidia has overwhelming control over their card venders. They can at any time stop supplying them with chips for cards. Since they can do this they essentially control everything that the venders are allowed to do, including the cost of their minimum products.
 

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
Since Nvidia, the manufacturer of the chips, sells them at a cost likely within the vast majority of the total cost of the venders end products, isn't it fair to say that even though Nvidia is not selling EVGAs cards that they have unfettered contribution to the price of EVGA's cards and thus basically control the minimum costs for their cards? From what I have learned, Nvidia has overwhelming control over their card venders. They can at any time stop supplying them with chips for cards. Since they can do this they essentially control everything that the venders are allowed to do, including the cost of their minimum products.
They can effectively set a minimum price, yes, but the AICs are free to go above that price — and the past year proves they're all more than willing to do so. Look at the RTX 3050 launch. Nvidia likely required every manufacturer to sell a reference clocked card at $250. However, that was likely in extremely limited quantities, and all the overclocked models could be sold at higher prices. The results was that AICs had cards priced at $400 or more, even for miniscule overclocks.

Again, until the demand no longer vastly eclipses supply, this will continue to happen. Even if the AICs and Nvidia sold the cards at lower prices, the distributors and retailers would jack up the prices. And if they didn't do it, scalpers would! Which is why there are now $1600 Steam Decks listed on eBay.
 
You mean an EVGA Store scalper? Proof that the AICs are just as culpable as anyone WRT the inflated prices. :D
Probably a need to spell out what and AIC and WRTs are for others to follow the conversation.

They can effectively set a minimum price, yes, but the AICs are free to go above that price — and the past year proves they're all more than willing to do so. Look at the RTX 3050 launch. Nvidia likely required every manufacturer to sell a reference clocked card at $250. However, that was likely in extremely limited quantities, and all the overclocked models could be sold at higher prices. The results was that AICs had cards priced at $400 or more, even for miniscule overclocks.

Again, until the demand no longer vastly eclipses supply, this will continue to happen. Even if the AICs and Nvidia sold the cards at lower prices, the distributors and retailers would jack up the prices. And if they didn't do it, scalpers would! Which is why there are now $1600 Steam Decks listed on eBay.
I agree with the basic, but nuanced, economic factors at play. I think there is something to be said about how Nvidia could be intentionally controlling the price increases, which in turn creates a sense of scarcity to drive demand higher than it should be. Regardless of why or how the prices are insane at least they seem to be falling, although slowly.
 

JarredWaltonGPU

Senior GPU Editor
Editor
Feb 21, 2020
1,406
1,424
4,070
1
Probably a need to spell out what and AIC and WRTs are for others to follow the conversation.
If anyone needs a cheat sheet: :p

AIC = Add-in Card. Basically, Asus, EVGA, Gigabyte, MSI, PNY, Sapphire, XFX, Zotac are the main US market AIC partners for Nvidia and/or AMD. (Sorry if I missed one or two.)
WRT = with regards to
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS