[SOLVED] Graphic card not getting enough power?

Jun 17, 2019
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Ok so starting a few weeks ago

Day one: I started getting screen artifacts. At first it would only happen after an hour of working (mostly web-surfing and TradingView charts) but then it started happening after 15 min or so and then almost right away. Artifacts would lead to a screen freeze right away, showing a green screen with black lines. I checked my GPU and found out its fan isn't working so I removed the GPU and started working with on-board graphic card. It worked fine, no more screen freeze and artifacts. I sent my GPU to get it fixed.

Day three: I had been working with on-board graphic and it was fine. I always put my computer on sleep mode when I'm sleeping (just recently found out that was a mistake). On day three, I pushed the power button, fans started working and lights turned on but then it suddenly turned off. this happened again and again. Nothing would came on screen during the brief moments of PC being on. I figured there's something wrong with power not going through. I called a guy, he did something which I didn't saw, and it got fixed right away. He said it had happened cause I have put it on sleep overnight and there must have been a voltage drop during that time.

A week later: been working with on-board graphic and had no more problems expect for it being slow. My GPU arrived, I connected it, turned PC on, desktop came up, then suddenly, artifacts showed up and then a freeze.

So, I figured either my gpu is dead or the gpu is fine but power supply is faulty and can't provide enough power for GPU.

I'm kinda short on money for upcoming two weeks so I rather save the money for either purchasing GPU or PSU and not send the pc to technicians again. So, is there any way to find out if the problem is my PSU or my GPU?

These are my specs:

PSU max power 700W
AMD Radeon HD 7850
i5-6600K 3.50 GHZ
8 gig RAM

I've been using this PC for three years now and It was second-handed when I bought it.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I called a guy, he did something which I didn't saw, and it got fixed right away. He said it had happened cause I have put it on sleep overnight and there must have been a voltage drop during that time.
That's a basket of nonsense. I don't know what he did, but I DO know that what he told you is a crock of you know what. No such thing related in any way. There are no "voltage drops" that happen DURING sleep. It's already at the lowest possible power state.

Bottom line is, you probably have a crappy power supply and need to replace it with a good quality unit of 450-550w. And, it needs to be a Haswell compliant unit since your Skylake system requires the same support for the C6/C7 low power states as all Haswell or newer Intel platforms.

Knowing the ACTUAL model number of that unit would be extremely helpful as well as how long roughly it has been in service.

That means it cannot be a group regulated unit and needs to be a DC-DC model, which MOST newer units of any halfway decent quality are.

Since you've had problems even with the graphics card removed and running on the iGPU, that suggests that the problem IS likely the power supply and not the graphics card, but the fact is it is not uncommon to have BOTH fail simultaneously especially if you've been running a graphics card with a low end power supply for a long period of time. And there is really no way to eliminate the graphics card as the source of the problem without first replacing the power supply with a known good model unless you have access to a high quality 450w or higher unit to test with. Personally, I'd just replace it because it's a pile of crap anyhow and needs to be replaced regardless of whether or not it's actually causing your current problems, because even if it's not, it's going to eventually cause something to fail or fail itself, and hopefully when it does it doesn't do it in spectacular fashion taking other components out with it when it goes.

Let's start with the biggest misconception out there, which is that if a unit has high watts it will be ok or is good. Well, that couldn't be further from the truth.

There are plenty of 750-1000w units out there that I wouldn't trust to power a light bulb and might in fact be more dangerous due to their supposedly high capacity due to poor or non-existent protections inside the unit.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, how many watts or amps it says it can support is irrelevant.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it is a PSU platform that we already know is good anyhow. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, whether or not it has an 80plus certification or not is irrelevant.

Whatever you do, don't EVER buy a power supply based on whether it has RGB or lighting, or looks like it might be a quality unit. Some of the biggest hunks of junk out there look just as good as a Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium, but I assure you, they are not. So far there are very few very good units out there that have RGB built in. Maybe one or two models, but rest assured you'll be be paying for the lighting, not for the quality of the power supply.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Seasonic. Seasonic isn't just a brand, they are a PSU manufacturer, unlike many of the PSU brands you see they make their own power supply platforms AND a great many of the very good PSU models out there from other brands like Antec, Corsair and older XFX are made by Seasonic.

Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions.

Most common currently, in order of preference, would be the Seasonic Focus series, then Focus plus, then Prime, then Prime ultra. It's worth mentioning that there are generally Gold, Platinum and Titanium versions within each, or most, of those series, but that does not necessarily mean that a Focus plus Platinum is necessarily better than a Prime Gold. It only means that it scored better in the 80plus efficiency testing, not that the platform is better.

Again, don't let yourself get tangled up in the idea that a higher 80plus rating specifically means that it is a better unit than another one with a lower rating, unless you know that it is a good platform from the start. All these Focus and Prime units are pretty good so you can somewhat focus on the 80plus rating when deciding which of them to choose.

Super Flower. Super Flower is another PSU manufacturer. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.They also make most of the good units sold by EVGA like the G2, G3, P2 and T2 models.

Super Flower doesn't have a very broad availability for the units with their own brand name on them, and are not available in a lot of countries but for those where there is availability you want to look at the Leadex and Leadex II models. The Golden green platform is fairly decent too but is getting rather long in the tooth as a platform AND I've seen some reviews indicating a few shortcomings on units based on this platform.

Even so, it's a great deal better than a lot of other platforms out there so you could certainly do worse than a Golden green model. Units based on the Leadex and Leadex II platforms are much better though.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, but still not what we'd call terrific, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles. I'd only choose this model if it is on sale or the aesthetics match up with your color scheme or design. Still a good power supply but maybe a little aggressive on the fan profile. This may have been cured on newer Edge models so reading professional tear down reviews is still the best idea.

Antec Earthwatts Gold units are very good also.

BeQuiet. BeQuiet does have a few decent models, BUT, you must be VERY selective about which of their models you put your trust in. From model to model their are huge differences in both quality and performance, even with the same series. If you cannot find a review for a BeQuiet unit on HardOCP, JonnyGuru or Tom's hardware that SPECIFICALLY says it is a very good unit, and does not have any significant issues in the "cons" category, I would avoid it. In fact, I'd probably avoid it anyhow unless there is a very great sale on one that has good reviews, because their units are generally more expensive than MUCH better units from Antec, Seasonic, EVGA and Corsair.

EVGA. They have BOTH good and not very good models.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most models failed testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models.

Good models are the B2, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master.

They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

This is just ONE example of why I say that. Very new and modern CM unit. One of the worst scores ever seen on JonnyGuru for a well known brand name product. Doesn't look to be much better than a Raidmax unit. Sad.

Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 600W review

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

Power supply discussion thread

The Powerspec units sold my Microcenter are a mixed bag. Some of them are fairly decent using the same platform as the Sirfa High power astro lite platform, so not total dumpster fire type units, but not particularly good either, and some of their units are simply garbage and should be listed below in the DO NOT USE category, but I'm leaving them out because there are really no reviews of them and since there are a few units from them that are ok-ish, I'm giving them a "use at your own discretion but buy a better model if you can" grade.

A gray label CX or CXm unit would probably be an upgrade from one of those Powerspec models, without any doubt.

Certainly there ARE some good units out there that you won't see above among those I've listed, but they are few and far between, much as a hidden nugget of gold you find in a crevice among otherwise ordinary rocks and don't EVER assume a unit is good just because of the brand.

If you cannot find an IN DEPTH, REPUTABLE review on Tom's hardware, JonnyGuru, HardOCP, Hardware secrets (Old reviews by Gabe Torres), Kitguru (Only Aris reviews), TechPowerUP, SilentPC crew or a similar site that does much more than simply a review of the unboxing and basic tests that don't include reliable results for ripple, noise, voltage regulation and a complete teardown of the unit including identification of the internal platform, then the unit is a big fat question mark.

I recommend not trusting such units as companies generally always send out review samples of any unit they feel is going to get a good review, and don't send them out if they know they are going to get hammered by the reviewer. No review usually equals poor quality. Usually.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I called a guy, he did something which I didn't saw, and it got fixed right away. He said it had happened cause I have put it on sleep overnight and there must have been a voltage drop during that time.
That's a basket of nonsense. I don't know what he did, but I DO know that what he told you is a crock of you know what. No such thing related in any way. There are no "voltage drops" that happen DURING sleep. It's already at the lowest possible power state.

Bottom line is, you probably have a crappy power supply and need to replace it with a good quality unit of 450-550w. And, it needs to be a Haswell compliant unit since your Skylake system requires the same support for the C6/C7 low power states as all Haswell or newer Intel platforms.

Knowing the ACTUAL model number of that unit would be extremely helpful as well as how long roughly it has been in service.

That means it cannot be a group regulated unit and needs to be a DC-DC model, which MOST newer units of any halfway decent quality are.

Since you've had problems even with the graphics card removed and running on the iGPU, that suggests that the problem IS likely the power supply and not the graphics card, but the fact is it is not uncommon to have BOTH fail simultaneously especially if you've been running a graphics card with a low end power supply for a long period of time. And there is really no way to eliminate the graphics card as the source of the problem without first replacing the power supply with a known good model unless you have access to a high quality 450w or higher unit to test with. Personally, I'd just replace it because it's a pile of crap anyhow and needs to be replaced regardless of whether or not it's actually causing your current problems, because even if it's not, it's going to eventually cause something to fail or fail itself, and hopefully when it does it doesn't do it in spectacular fashion taking other components out with it when it goes.

Let's start with the biggest misconception out there, which is that if a unit has high watts it will be ok or is good. Well, that couldn't be further from the truth.

There are plenty of 750-1000w units out there that I wouldn't trust to power a light bulb and might in fact be more dangerous due to their supposedly high capacity due to poor or non-existent protections inside the unit.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, how many watts or amps it says it can support is irrelevant.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it is a PSU platform that we already know is good anyhow. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

If the platform isn't good to begin with, whether or not it has an 80plus certification or not is irrelevant.

Whatever you do, don't EVER buy a power supply based on whether it has RGB or lighting, or looks like it might be a quality unit. Some of the biggest hunks of junk out there look just as good as a Seasonic Prime Ultra Titanium, but I assure you, they are not. So far there are very few very good units out there that have RGB built in. Maybe one or two models, but rest assured you'll be be paying for the lighting, not for the quality of the power supply.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Seasonic. Seasonic isn't just a brand, they are a PSU manufacturer, unlike many of the PSU brands you see they make their own power supply platforms AND a great many of the very good PSU models out there from other brands like Antec, Corsair and older XFX are made by Seasonic.

Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions.

Most common currently, in order of preference, would be the Seasonic Focus series, then Focus plus, then Prime, then Prime ultra. It's worth mentioning that there are generally Gold, Platinum and Titanium versions within each, or most, of those series, but that does not necessarily mean that a Focus plus Platinum is necessarily better than a Prime Gold. It only means that it scored better in the 80plus efficiency testing, not that the platform is better.

Again, don't let yourself get tangled up in the idea that a higher 80plus rating specifically means that it is a better unit than another one with a lower rating, unless you know that it is a good platform from the start. All these Focus and Prime units are pretty good so you can somewhat focus on the 80plus rating when deciding which of them to choose.

Super Flower. Super Flower is another PSU manufacturer. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.They also make most of the good units sold by EVGA like the G2, G3, P2 and T2 models.

Super Flower doesn't have a very broad availability for the units with their own brand name on them, and are not available in a lot of countries but for those where there is availability you want to look at the Leadex and Leadex II models. The Golden green platform is fairly decent too but is getting rather long in the tooth as a platform AND I've seen some reviews indicating a few shortcomings on units based on this platform.

Even so, it's a great deal better than a lot of other platforms out there so you could certainly do worse than a Golden green model. Units based on the Leadex and Leadex II platforms are much better though.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, but still not what we'd call terrific, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles. I'd only choose this model if it is on sale or the aesthetics match up with your color scheme or design. Still a good power supply but maybe a little aggressive on the fan profile. This may have been cured on newer Edge models so reading professional tear down reviews is still the best idea.

Antec Earthwatts Gold units are very good also.

BeQuiet. BeQuiet does have a few decent models, BUT, you must be VERY selective about which of their models you put your trust in. From model to model their are huge differences in both quality and performance, even with the same series. If you cannot find a review for a BeQuiet unit on HardOCP, JonnyGuru or Tom's hardware that SPECIFICALLY says it is a very good unit, and does not have any significant issues in the "cons" category, I would avoid it. In fact, I'd probably avoid it anyhow unless there is a very great sale on one that has good reviews, because their units are generally more expensive than MUCH better units from Antec, Seasonic, EVGA and Corsair.

EVGA. They have BOTH good and not very good models.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most models failed testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models.

Good models are the B2, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master.

They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

This is just ONE example of why I say that. Very new and modern CM unit. One of the worst scores ever seen on JonnyGuru for a well known brand name product. Doesn't look to be much better than a Raidmax unit. Sad.

Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite 600W review

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

Power supply discussion thread

The Powerspec units sold my Microcenter are a mixed bag. Some of them are fairly decent using the same platform as the Sirfa High power astro lite platform, so not total dumpster fire type units, but not particularly good either, and some of their units are simply garbage and should be listed below in the DO NOT USE category, but I'm leaving them out because there are really no reviews of them and since there are a few units from them that are ok-ish, I'm giving them a "use at your own discretion but buy a better model if you can" grade.

A gray label CX or CXm unit would probably be an upgrade from one of those Powerspec models, without any doubt.

Certainly there ARE some good units out there that you won't see above among those I've listed, but they are few and far between, much as a hidden nugget of gold you find in a crevice among otherwise ordinary rocks and don't EVER assume a unit is good just because of the brand.

If you cannot find an IN DEPTH, REPUTABLE review on Tom's hardware, JonnyGuru, HardOCP, Hardware secrets (Old reviews by Gabe Torres), Kitguru (Only Aris reviews), TechPowerUP, SilentPC crew or a similar site that does much more than simply a review of the unboxing and basic tests that don't include reliable results for ripple, noise, voltage regulation and a complete teardown of the unit including identification of the internal platform, then the unit is a big fat question mark.

I recommend not trusting such units as companies generally always send out review samples of any unit they feel is going to get a good review, and don't send them out if they know they are going to get hammered by the reviewer. No review usually equals poor quality. Usually.


Other models that should never be trusted OR USED AT ALL, under any circumstances, include

A-Top, AK Power, Alpine, Apevia, Apex (Supercase/Allied), Artic, Ace, Aerocool (There might be one model worth using, but I'd still avoid them.), Aspire (Turbocase), Atadc, Atrix, Broadway com corp, Chieftech, Circle, CIT, Coolmax, Deer, Diablotek, Dynapower, Dynex, Eagletech, Enlight, Eurotech, Evo labs, EZ cool, Feedtek, Foxconn, G7, HEC/Compucase Orion, HEDY, High power, iBall, iStar computer co., Jeantec, JPac, Just PC, Kolink, LC Power, Linkworld electronics, Logisys, Macron, MSI, NmediaPC, Norwood Micro (CompUSA), Okia, Powercool, Powmax, Pulsepower, Q-tec, Raidmax, Rave, Rocketfish, Segotep, SFC, Sharkoon, Shuttle, Skyhawk, Spire, Startech, Storm, Sumvision, Tesla, Trust, Ultra, Wintech, Winpower, Xilence (Until I see a reputable review of a model showing different), xTreme (Cyberpower), Youngbear and Zebronics.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Metal Messiah.
Jun 17, 2019
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That's a basket of nonsense. I don't know what he did, but I DO know that what he told you is a crock of you know what. No such thing related in any way. There are no "voltage drops" that happen DURING sleep. It's already at the lowest possible power state.

Bottom line is, you probably have a crappy power supply and need to replace it with a good quality unit of 450-550w. And, it needs to be a Haswell compliant unit since your Skylake system requires the same support for the C6/C7 low power states as all Haswell or newer Intel platforms.

Knowing the ACTUAL model number of that unit would be extremely helpful as well as how long roughly it has been in service.

That means it cannot be a group regulated unit and needs to be a DC-DC model, which MOST newer units of any halfway decent quality are.

Since you've had problems even with the graphics card removed and running on the iGPU, that suggests that the problem IS likely the power supply and not the graphics card, but the fact is it is not uncommon to have BOTH fail simultaneously especially if you've been running a graphics card with a low end power supply for a long period of time. And there is really no way to eliminate the graphics card as the source of the problem without first replacing the power supply with a known good model unless you have access to a high quality 450w or higher unit to test with. Personally, I'd just replace it because it's a pile of crap anyhow and needs to be replaced regardless of whether or not it's actually causing your current problems, because even if it's not, it's going to eventually cause something to fail or fail itself, and hopefully when it does it doesn't do it in spectacular fashion taking other components out with it when it goes.
Thanks for your reply. you're right, I'll change PSU first.

I think the guy that fixed it that day meant a voltage problem from the electricity company has caused problems in PSU while it was on sleep mode. he also said that it might have been due to removing the graphic card, that somehow working with on-board video card has put too much pressure on the system and caused power problems. anyway might have been nonsense, really curios on how he fixed it though :))
 

iMatty

Notable
Mar 14, 2019
1,098
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Why would someone put PC to sleep during night? just shut it down.
At least if anything happened during night like over-voltage or something it wont case as much damage.
Plus as dark breeze said, there's no such thing as on board card putting pressure on system? don't just let anyone access your computer and do random stuff that you didn't see and say its fixed.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I put my system to sleep every time I plan to leave it for more than five minutes, and that includes at night. I don't ever shut it down, and most people don't, except when required for service or upgrades or cleaning, etc., or periodically just to refresh things. Usually about once per week. There is no problem with doing that at all. There is absolutely no reason to have to shut down the whole system every night.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

iMatty

Notable
Mar 14, 2019
1,098
133
890
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i find it much safer to turn it off during night, have seen a lot of my friends kill their computers to put their pc to sleep at night while we have a storm outside.
thats why i turn off my pc at night incase of anything happening.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If you live in a region with a particularly bad power grid, or poorly earthed services, or in an area where nightly electrical storms are a frequent occurrence, then yes that is probably not a bad idea. However, just turning off your system does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to protect it from a lightning strike or heavy surge from a brown out. So long as it is still connected to the socket and the socket is still connected to the grid, then it is JUST as susceptible to damage from lightning strikes or surges as it is when sleeping or running.

The only way to protect against those is to turn the whole system off AND unplug it from the wall. Every time. OR, have whole house protection installed at the panel as well as having a very high end industrial surge protection unit installed between the PC and the socket.

But, we are going off topic now so lets return to the subject of the thread.
 
Reactions: Elaaryia
Jun 17, 2019
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Why would someone put PC to sleep during night? just shut it down.
At least if anything happened during night like over-voltage or something it wont case as much damage.
Plus as dark breeze said, there's no such thing as on board card putting pressure on system? don't just let anyone access your computer and do random stuff that you didn't see and say its fixed.
well it isn't just that he said it's fixed. The problem that I had at that moment did get fixed. he might have said nonsense about the source of the problem but it got fixed anyway.

and about the sleep mode, yeah it was a mistake on my part. I'm thinking that the whole thing might be a result of this mistake cause I've been doing it for three years and it might have damaged my PSU over time.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Putting your PC to sleep at night instead of shutting it down, did not, and COULD not, cause any damage to it unless there was a lightning strike or you have a bad power grid in your region where brown outs are common. And even if that were true, it is just as likely to be damaged while you are in the middle of using it as it is to happen while at night when it is sleeping.

You can't blame yourself for the fact that your unit simply has a low quality, probably quite old, power supply, unless of course you selected and purchased that power supply yourself.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

iMatty

Notable
Mar 14, 2019
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Like i live in doha, i have had like 5 power cuts instantly because the surge breaker flipped.
But nothing happened, a good power supply will protect you with a good motherboard.
 
Jun 17, 2019
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Putting your PC to sleep at night instead of shutting it down, did not, and COULD not, cause any damage to it unless there was a lightning strike or you have a bad power grid in your region where brown outs are common. And even if that were true, it is just as likely to be damaged while you are in the middle of using it as it is to happen while at night when it is sleeping.

You can't blame yourself for the fact that your unit simply has a low quality, probably quite old, power supply, unless of course you selected and purchased that power supply yourself.
My brother purchased it but I don't trust him lol. I read some reviews on it now (too late though) and it seems to be mediocre. it's also been three years so in conclusion old and mediocre. add bad power grid to that as well. in the end, I guess it's lucky I got artifacts to warn me before a whole system wreckage!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's actually not the worst unit in the world, for a cheap budget model, when it was new, however, it uses really cheap Aishi capacitors and some fairly decent Elite caps. At three years old, which is exactly the warranty period, an considering your power grid issues, I'd say it's probably questionable at best, although it's possible that it may still be serviceable as that unit is not AS bad as I originally thought before knowing the model.

I think if it were me, I'd try that graphics card in another system that has a good 450w or higher PSU in it to test and see if it has the same problems. If it does, then it's likely the graphics card is the problem. If it does not, then replacing the PSU might be the next advisable step.

I do still think though that given the problems you had without the graphics card installed, it would be a good idea to just replace the unit with a higher quality model so you know for sure.
 
Reactions: Elaaryia
Jun 17, 2019
6
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10
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That's actually not the worst unit in the world, for a cheap budget model, when it was new, however, it uses really cheap Aishi capacitors and some fairly decent Elite caps. At three years old, which is exactly the warranty period, an considering your power grid issues, I'd say it's probably questionable at best, although it's possible that it may still be serviceable as that unit is not AS bad as I originally thought before knowing the model.

I think if it were me, I'd try that graphics card in another system that has a good 450w or higher PSU in it to test and see if it has the same problems. If it does, then it's likely the graphics card is the problem. If it does not, then replacing the PSU might be the next advisable step.

I do still think though that given the problems you had without the graphics card installed, it would be a good idea to just replace the unit with a higher quality model so you know for sure.
I would check gpu on another system but unfortunately that’s not an option till next week. Right now it seems to me that what you said in your earlier post about both of them being faulty is correct cause I just checked gpu again, and it seems that it heats up just a few seconds after I turn the PC on. I’m assuming this means gpu is faulty? considering I’ve just had its fan replaced.
 

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