[SOLVED] Graphics Card HDMI Display Issue

arsenal009

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Hey, I just got a new motherboard (MSI MPG Z590 GAMING PLUS), processor (Intel Core i5-11600K), & a cooler.
I use 3 displays with my video card (Asus ROG-STRIX-RX580-O8G-GAMING) and never had issues before.
However, since my upgrade I am unable to get my display connected to the HDMI port to work. The 2 display ports work fine.
The HDMI display shows bios. Also, I get a display when the computer is loading up to just before windows 10 loads. But once it starts to load my screen loses display. Or sometimes it shows a scrambled display for a few seconds & then I lose display
Any idea how I can fix this?

Thank You
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Reset is not the same a clean install. Not by a LONG shot. Sometimes, rarely, using the existing OS installation will work, but usually there will be problems. Also, when doing a reset, refresh or restore, these use configurations that were saved at the time the original installation was done. They are also OFTEN problematic as compared to actually doing a CLEAN install.

It might not be the solution to your problem, but in truth it is something you NEED to try first, because it IS the solution often enough to not ignore. It's proven over and over again. Then, if you still have the problem AFTER you complete all the recommended steps, that is when you ought to be looking at other, less obvious possibilities.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/new-rtx-2070-1440p-monitor-goes-black-every-two-minutes.3399089/#21479970

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/new-rtx-2070-is-recognized-in-device-manager-displays-on-monitors-but-runs-games-poorly-40-60-fps.3495343/#post-21131083





I'd recommend that you update your BIOS first. Then reset the BIOS to the default settings followed by then re-configuring any custom settings you need to configure such as fan profiles, boot orders or overclocking settings. Then do a clean install. Then MANUALLY, (Don't ever use any of the automatic driver updating utilities, not even those supplied by the board manufacturer, download and update any drivers available from the manufacturer's product page for your motherboard including chipset, storage controller (Not including RAID drivers. Don't install these unless you know that you are going to configure a RAID array), network LAN/Ethernet and WiFi drivers and audio drivers.

In fact, there are a good many of us who will tell you that installing ANY of the optional manufacturer bundled/downloadable utilities and softwares is a bad idea. Drivers, fine. BIOS updates, fine. REQUIRED software, for things like lighting controls etc., fine. Optional utilities like MSI Center, Gigabyte App center or Easy tune, Asus Armory crate (May be required for some features), etc., that come either bundled on disk with the motherboard or are available as optional downloads from the manufacturer website are a roll of the dice as to whether they'll actually be beneficial or cause problems that didn't exist before hand. I recommend not installing any of them unless you absolutely have to. There are generally better third party alternatives for most these types of utilities. Drivers are a different story.

In fact, it's probably a good idea that you run through all of the following.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your system has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard or exact laptop model on the device manufacturer's website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



And lAnd last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates (OR if you have installed ANY, EVEN REMOTELY QUESTIONABLE SOFTWARE, ESPECIALLY ANYTHING THAT'S BEEN PIRATED), it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows (AND THEN NOT PUT THAT QUESTIONABLE OR PIRATED SOFTWARE BACK ON) if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 

arsenal009

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At first, I didn't.
But afterwards, I went to settings, recovery, & reset this PC.

I'm still not getting the 3rd display to work. Other than in bios or safe mode.
Anything else I can try?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Reset is not the same a clean install. Not by a LONG shot. Sometimes, rarely, using the existing OS installation will work, but usually there will be problems. Also, when doing a reset, refresh or restore, these use configurations that were saved at the time the original installation was done. They are also OFTEN problematic as compared to actually doing a CLEAN install.

It might not be the solution to your problem, but in truth it is something you NEED to try first, because it IS the solution often enough to not ignore. It's proven over and over again. Then, if you still have the problem AFTER you complete all the recommended steps, that is when you ought to be looking at other, less obvious possibilities.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/new-rtx-2070-1440p-monitor-goes-black-every-two-minutes.3399089/#21479970

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/new-rtx-2070-is-recognized-in-device-manager-displays-on-monitors-but-runs-games-poorly-40-60-fps.3495343/#post-21131083





I'd recommend that you update your BIOS first. Then reset the BIOS to the default settings followed by then re-configuring any custom settings you need to configure such as fan profiles, boot orders or overclocking settings. Then do a clean install. Then MANUALLY, (Don't ever use any of the automatic driver updating utilities, not even those supplied by the board manufacturer, download and update any drivers available from the manufacturer's product page for your motherboard including chipset, storage controller (Not including RAID drivers. Don't install these unless you know that you are going to configure a RAID array), network LAN/Ethernet and WiFi drivers and audio drivers.

In fact, there are a good many of us who will tell you that installing ANY of the optional manufacturer bundled/downloadable utilities and softwares is a bad idea. Drivers, fine. BIOS updates, fine. REQUIRED software, for things like lighting controls etc., fine. Optional utilities like MSI Center, Gigabyte App center or Easy tune, Asus Armory crate (May be required for some features), etc., that come either bundled on disk with the motherboard or are available as optional downloads from the manufacturer website are a roll of the dice as to whether they'll actually be beneficial or cause problems that didn't exist before hand. I recommend not installing any of them unless you absolutely have to. There are generally better third party alternatives for most these types of utilities. Drivers are a different story.

In fact, it's probably a good idea that you run through all of the following.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your system has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard or exact laptop model on the device manufacturer's website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



And lAnd last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates (OR if you have installed ANY, EVEN REMOTELY QUESTIONABLE SOFTWARE, ESPECIALLY ANYTHING THAT'S BEEN PIRATED), it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows (AND THEN NOT PUT THAT QUESTIONABLE OR PIRATED SOFTWARE BACK ON) if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 

arsenal009

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Alright, I will try the steps you stated.
BTW, for my motherboard to detect my displays, I have to boot in CSM mode instead of UEFI.
I had to disconnect my graphics card and connect a display to the integrated graphics card to make the switch from UEFI to CSM. I'm assuming my graphics card (Asus ROG-STRIX-RX580-O8G-GAMING) is not being detected in UEFI mode?
Is that normal? Or is there a way to fix that?
 
Last edited:

arsenal009

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Ok, I did a clean install on a GPT storage.
Now I am unable to get any display to show up with my GPU connected to my motherboard. Either in UEFI or CSM mode...

Display only works now when GPU is disconnected and monitor is connected via display port or HDMI to integrated graphics card.

Any ideas?
 
Last edited:

arsenal009

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I should also mention I updated the bios & did a hard bios reset. I'm unable to get a display with my GPU connected to the motherboard in UEFI or CSM mode.
I tried with an older GPU and I still have the same issue.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Are you talking no display at all, or no display in Windows? Are you able to get a display prior to it loading windows?

Try going into the BIOS with it connected to the iGPU and in the BIOS change the primary graphics display setting to PCIe/PEG, save settings, exit BIOS, shut down, install graphics card and display cables, power back on.
 

arsenal009

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On the MSI board, I went to settings > advanced > integrated graphics configuration.
Initiate Graphic Adapter is set to PEG.
After the clean install on a GPT storage, I'm not getting a display at all. No display prior to loading windows either.

I have tried with 2 dGPUs on 2 different PCIe slots in both CSM & UEFI mode, with 3 different displays.

Further, my iGPU only works in UEFI mode not in CSM mode. Not sure why.
 
Last edited:

arsenal009

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GPU is working fine with previous hardware.

Ok, so I left the dGPU installed, changed Initiate Graphic Adapter to IGD with display plugged into motherboard.
Windows booted up. Then I unplugged display from motherboard, plugged it into dGPU along with my other 2 displays. All 3 displays are working now.

But when I restart my computer, I don't see anything until Windows loads. Basically, I can't see the bios, safe mode, etc.

Edit: Ok, sometimes when I restart everything works fine after windows loads. Other times only 1 display works & it keeps going on & off.

Edit 2: I installed updated motherboard drivers to see if that would help. Installing the "MSI USB Audio FW Update Tool" driver got me to lose my HDMI display on my dGPU.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
GPU is working fine with previous hardware.

Ok, so I left the dGPU installed, changed Initiate Graphic Adapter to IGD with display plugged into motherboard.
Windows booted up. Then I unplugged display from motherboard, plugged it into dGPU along with my other 2 displays. All 3 displays are working now.

But when I restart my computer, I don't see anything until Windows loads. Basically, I can't see the bios, safe mode, etc.

Edit: Ok, sometimes when I restart everything works fine after windows loads. Other times only 1 display works & it keeps going on & off.

Edit 2: I installed updated motherboard drivers to see if that would help. Installing the "MSI USB Audio FW Update Tool" driver got me to lose my HDMI display on my dGPU.
What is the EXACT model of your power supply, and how long has that unit been in service?
 

arsenal009

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According to my newegg invoice: seasonic X750 gold 750W R
item number: 17-151-087
invoice date: december 2011

model number: X-750 (SS-750KM Active PFC F3)
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so that power supply, while a very good model when it was new, is now 10 years old. That is well past the point at which it ought to have been replaced, EVEN IF YOU HAD NO PROBLEMS with the system.

That unit had a 7 year warranty and we know that on those 10+ year old platforms Seasonic was maybe pushing the warranty boundaries a little bit anyhow, in the hopes of out marketing some competition who were not willing to extend their warranties past five years at that time, and on THOSE platforms that were prevalent at that time. So anyhow, it's like three years past warranty and generally if it's your primary system we recommend not using a power supply more than maybe two years longer than it's stated warranty period. If the manufacturer believes that is the amount of time the product is going to be reliable for, on average, then I am not going to argue too much with them although I generally give about an extra two years like I said, so long as there are no signs yet of problems. Beyond that, it either gets moved to service in a non-critical system or goes in the trash bin. Occasionally I'll just set it aside for a temporary backup in the event I need another PSU for a very short period.

What does all this have to do with your system? Maybe nothing. Maybe everything. The fact is that there have been hundreds of occasions when we've seen, here on the forums and on the work bench, systems with power supplies that have become weak over time and are fully able to support a system with an iGPU but things either get flaky or simply don't work at all when a discreet card is added. I'd almost go out on a limb and say, especially a discreet card that is having to push three displays.

So, I can't tell you with any kind of certainty that this is the problem you are having, but I think I'd definitely want to get a known good unit that is still within it's warranty period, that is both fully functional and has sufficient capacity for your hardware, and at the very least try that to see if it makes the difference. It might not, but it very well might. And beyond that, in my opinion if you value your hardware then I'd say it's time to replace it anyhow. While that unit had full protections that were available for it's time, we know for certain that that ripple and voltage regulation get iffy when a unit, any unit, accumulates enough miles, and ripple/voltage regulation can cumulatively destroy your hardware over time.

Just a thought, beyond what we've already discussed previously. Aside from that, I can't come up with a good reason why it works fine with the old hardware and not with the new hardware unless there is simply a faulty motherboard.
 

arsenal009

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What wattage do you recommend for a PSU running the following specs?:

MSI MPG Z590 GAMING PLUS
Intel Core i5-11600K
64GB DDR4 Ram
ROG-STRIX-RX580-O8G-GAMING (running 3 displays)
2 SSD
2 HDD
1 Optical Drive

Also, should I replace the motherboard? Not sure if my system will work if I only replace the PSU. If yes, which do you recommend:

ASRock Z590 PRO4 for CAD$210 + sound card for optical port (~$80) https://www.newegg.ca/p/N82E16813157987

ASUS TUF GAMING Z590-PLUS for CAD$ 283 https://www.newegg.ca/p/N82E16813119374 ?

Not sure if Asus mobo is more likely to be compatible with my ASUS ROG Strix Radeon RX 580 O8G Gaming OC Edition
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Why wouldn't your system work if you replaced only the PSU? I can't think of a single reason why that would ever be a "thing" unless you had a system with a motherboard that was either proprietary, like some Dell and HP prebuilt system motherboards, or one of the newer Seasonic Syncro or Connect style power supplies with it's own "breakout box" or whatever they want to call it. Which, yours isn't.

I'd do the power supply first, since that's pretty much a good recommendation given it's age no matter what else is or isn't wrong with it.

As far as what's good, I'll leave that up to you based on what is available to you regionally, but use these two threads to help you come to a decision.





For a short list of recommendations, that may or may not be available to you, it's hard to go wrong with any Seasonic Prime (Gold, Platinum, Titanium) unit or any Corsair RMx or RMi (I don't like the basic RM, with no x or i, for your system, but those too are viable although not as good), HX or AX unit. The Superflower Leadex III units are good as are the EVGA G2, G3, P2 and T2 units. Whatever you do, don't go with a model based only on the brand. All brands have good and not so good models, so research the model and look at professional reviews before making any decision, or simply ask here about a specific model you are interested in.

As far as the motherboard, I'd wait until you try the power supply, for multiple reasons, not least of which being if there is a problem with yours it should still be under warranty and you might not need one anyhow. One step at a time.

For reference, these steps are good to be aware of as well.


 

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