System32_76

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Hello everyone!

What are some free, great GPU stress test apps for Linux?

I'm looking for just GPU stress testing apps, no benchmarking ones.
 

JWNoctis

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AMD or Nvidia?

There's gpu-burn for Nvidia GPU's, available on GitHub with link to compiled binaries, though I've not much experience with that myself. I burned in my most recent one with a few days' worth of Folding@Home GPU workunits, but that's under Windows and I'm not sure if it would work the same way under Linux - Though I'd expect it to.

Other than those, there are mfaktc(CUDA)/mfakto(OpenCL), which are used for trial factoring Mersenne primes.

AFAIK about all of them stressed only parts of the GPU relevant to their use case, and may have trouble finding all instabilities.

I'd be interested to know if there's something better, as well.

EDIT: Also please use caution with stress tests - Damages may result with aging or improperly manufactured or configured hardware and, while regrettable, no author of such software (nor anyone mentioning them ;)) would accept any liability for such happenings.
 
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System32_76

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Jul 29, 2019
95
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535
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AMD or Nvidia?

There's gpu-burn for Nvidia GPU's, available on GitHub with link to compiled binaries, though I've not much experience with that myself. I burned in my most recent one with a few days' worth of Folding@Home GPU workunits, but that's under Windows and I'm not sure if it would work the same way under Linux - Though I'd expect it to.

Other than those, there are mfaktc(CUDA)/mfakto(OpenCL), which are used for trial factoring Mersenne primes.

AFAIK about all of them stressed only parts of the GPU relevant to their use case, and may have trouble finding all instabilities.

I'd be interested to know if there's something better, as well.

EDIT: Also please use caution with stress tests - Damages may result with aging or improperly manufactured or configured hardware and, while regrettable, no author of such software (nor anyone mentioning them ;)) would accept any liability for such happenings.
In my case, since I'm working with old computers from the late 2000s to the early 2010s, and the fact that most of those computers have CPUs that have integrated graphics, I don't need to stress test the GPUs, then, right?
 

JWNoctis

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Jun 9, 2021
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In my case, since I'm working with old computers from the late 2000s to the early 2010s, and the fact that most of those computers have CPUs that have integrated graphics, I don't need to stress test the GPUs, then, right?
Depending on what you use them for.

This has gotten outside my knowledge, but your options had just gotten considerably narrower. There are old versions of mfaktc for earlier CUDA versions, but beyond those...I understand that even the correct driver can be tricky.
 

System32_76

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Jul 29, 2019
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Depending on what you use them for.

This has gotten outside my knowledge, but your options had just gotten considerably narrower. There are old versions of mfaktc for earlier CUDA versions, but beyond those...I understand that even the correct driver can be tricky.
In my case, I'm refurbishing and selling off computers as PCs for everyday use. I want to ensure that the hardware in these PCs, including the GPU, last a good, long time for the customer. So I wouldn't have to stress test the GPUs then?
 
I want to ensure that the hardware in these PCs, including the GPU, last a good, long time for the customer. So I wouldn't have to stress test the GPUs then?
No, you should.

I have experienced the irritation after bying a cheap laptop that had a defect, and it for sure would be exposed if the seller had spend any effort to actually stress-testing it.

So for the customer and for your reputation as a serious seller, I'll say it's is better if you run a stress test and memory test (Memtest86+) and being able to provide documentation that the computer was in good condition when passed to the customer.
 

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