[SOLVED] Gtx 1070 or Rtx 2060 on 550W psu?

Feb 21, 2019
6
0
10
0
I'm planning to upgrade my gpu from gtx 660 to either gtx 1070 or rtx 2060. My question is: will it work with my 550W psu?

My psu: Radix VI 550
Cpu: intel i7 4790k
Ram: 2 x Geil Dragon Ram (total 16GB)
Motherboard: ASRock Fatal1ty Z97 Killer
3 HDD drives

Target gpu's:
ZOTAC GTX 1070 AMP Extreme
(they mention 250W in the specs but recommend 500W psu)
Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 1070
(150W in the specs)
RTX 2060 (I haven't yet decided which one but it's similar to GTX 1070)

On the side note: which one is better: avarage rtx 2060 or this gtx 1070 zotac amp extreme?

Thanks in advance!
 
The Tacens Radix VI 550W that is made by Huntkey. Tacens PSUs are horrible. Its single +12V rail is rated for 32 Amps and it only has a single 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector for the graphics card.

The ZOTAC GTX 1070 AMP Extreme requires two 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

Power supply wattage is not determines whether it is adequate or inadequate to power a graphics card. Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) and a sufficient number of the correct types of PCI Express supplementary power connectors are the most crucial specifications.

On average the RTX 2060 performs better than the GTX 1070.
 
The Tacens Radix VI 550W that is made by Huntkey. Tacens PSUs are horrible. Its single +12V rail is rated for 32 Amps and it only has a single 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector for the graphics card.

The ZOTAC GTX 1070 AMP Extreme requires two 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

Power supply wattage is not determines whether it is adequate or inadequate to power a graphics card. Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) and a sufficient number of the correct types of PCI Express supplementary power connectors are the most crucial specifications.

On average the RTX 2060 performs better than the GTX 1070.
 

demonesc

Prominent
Jul 28, 2018
82
1
665
7
im using a 2060 on a 550w PSU and its absolutely fine , they both have 1920 cores but the 2060 outperforms the 1070 , mines hitting 1950mhz on gpu boost the memory is twice faster 8 Gbps v 14 Gbps with around 100 Gps more bandwidth which more than makes up for losing 2Gb of memory
 
im using a 2060 on a 550w PSU and its absolutely fine , they both have 1920 cores but the 2060 outperforms the 1070 , mines hitting 1950mhz on gpu boost the memory is twice faster 8 Gbps v 14 Gbps with around 100 Gps more bandwidth which more than makes up for losing 2Gb of memory
Your Corsair CX550M is vastly superior to the OP's Tacens Radix VI 550W .
 
Feb 21, 2019
6
0
10
0
The Tacens Radix VI 550W that is made by Huntkey. Tacens PSUs are horrible. Its single +12V rail is rated for 32 Amps and it only has a single 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector for the graphics card.

The ZOTAC GTX 1070 AMP Extreme requires two 8-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

Power supply wattage is not determines whether it is adequate or inadequate to power a graphics card. Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) and a sufficient number of the correct types of PCI Express supplementary power connectors are the most crucial specifications.

On average the RTX 2060 performs better than the GTX 1070.
Thank you for you in-depth reply! Can I also ask you for any psu suggestions then? Preferably something that I won't need to change too soon (so 550W+), but also not too pricey.
 
Feb 21, 2019
6
0
10
0
Yes, that PSU will work fine.

On a side note, that was very bold of you to run your new hardware on a known inadequate/crappy PSU. Power supplies can do funny things when they die - like, take components that are plugged into them out as well!
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Power supplies can do funny things when they die - like, take components that are plugged into them out as well!
I suspect it isn't so much 'when they die' as it is dying or otherwise inadequate output caps letting excessive switching transients through and slow-cooking components that way until a catastrophic primary-side failure lands the finishing blow. Better PSUs have more better quality caps and when a catastrophic failure happens on the primary side, the caps absorb the transients and nothing significant comes out of the outputs.

I repair PSUs as a hobby and I've seen some put out 12-18V peaks on the 5V or 5VSB rail due to dead output filter caps. Not hard to imagine this wrecking anything connected to them.
 
Feb 21, 2019
6
0
10
0
My psu has (or now had) some protections and could output 550W (as required by the gpu and cpu) so I have put some trust into it. I will let you know if anything else was damaged, but for now, my nose tells me only psu was damaged. I don't know how to check for damage in any other way though. I will post the result on this thread when my new psu arrives :p
 
I suspect it isn't so much 'when they die' as it is dying or otherwise inadequate output caps letting excessive switching transients through and slow-cooking components that way until a catastrophic primary-side failure lands the finishing blow.
True.
But this 'slow cooking,' in terms relative to the speed of electricity, can happen very quickly in human terms. "Going, going, gone!" can be a matter of seconds.
Maybe I'm just a bit paranoid/protective about components but I've experience the PSU "pop" (in a repair/build environment) multiple times and on one of those occasions it took out a video card with it. 😩
 
Feb 21, 2019
6
0
10
0
I am back with new PSU, and, thankfully, with only new PSU. The dying Tacens didn't damage my motherboard or anything else (and I am thankful for that) and everything, RTX 2060 included, works well on this new Corsair CX750.
You can be sure that I will never again risk using psu that might be incompatible :sweatsmile: It was completly not worth it.
Thank you all for helping me out and I think it's time to close this thread.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS