[SOLVED] Gtx1660 or Ryzen5. Need Advice/Thoughts

Nov 17, 2019
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Hey Everyone, this is my current build , im looking to upgrade to

Ryzen 3 2200g
Gtx 1050ti-gtx 1660
gigabyte a320m
corsair 8gb ddr4-add 8gb ram
CoolerMaster MasterWattLite500w -corsair cx550

will this be a good build for 2020?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
A large part of the performance on Ryzen comes from the factory boost behavior OR from PBO/2, if you choose to use that on platforms that support it. But even for the stock boost behavior, which has nothing to do with overclocking, it can be a factor. Now, that being said, the point wasn't that YOUR upgrade would realistically benefit from a higher end type board, just that IN GENERAL the motherboard DOES make a difference especially if a high end CPU and memory configuration is being used.

For your 2200G upgrade, I'd probably just stick to an entry level board UNLESS you plan to AGAIN upgrade the CPU at some point in which case THEN it makes little sense to go with a cheap board now that is not going to be a good foundation for that next step later. In that case, go with at least a middling tiered B450 in the 100 dollar range, like the Tomahawk. In fact, for almost anybody building on Ryzen right now, it's almost a waste to do anything less than that if it's to be a gaming system.
 
Reactions: ThilakRoX
Depends on your aims.

A graphics card will negate the integrated graphics of the 2200G, and four threads are starting to be limited in gaming. Might be better to see if the 1600/2600 are of comparable price where you are.

There are other things, but it depends on the budget you're working with and what your use case is.
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
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The cpu wont hold back the 1660 that much but will definitely bottleneck. You could upgrade the CPU to a R5 2600 at least but you have a low end AM4 motherboard and may have issues (generally A320 supports newer ryzen after an BIOS update). You may also have issues with the 4x4 RAM you will have.
The upgrade is overall good but you will need to upgrade the CPU and motherborad in the future. Also if you can, go for the 1660ti and the CX550M (semi modular)
 
Dec 6, 2019
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Hello there,
I am about to buy some components to upgrade my pc.
My question is: will all those parts be compatible and at their max with eachother (Ryzen 5 3600 || G.skillripjawsV 16gb ddr4 rams || msi gtx 1060 3gb || msi B450 Pro-VDH Max )?
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
86
9
1,565
13
Hello there,
I am about to buy some components to upgrade my pc.
My question is: will all those parts be compatible and at their max with eachother (Ryzen 5 3600 || G.skillripjawsV 16gb ddr4 rams || msi gtx 1060 3gb || msi B450 Pro-VDH Max )?
They are compatible and should work out of the box. GTX 1060 3gb is out of the game in 2019+ and weak compared to the rest of the build...go for a RX570(at least), RX580, GTX1660 or GTX1660ti.
 
Dec 6, 2019
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GTX 1060 3gb is out of the game in 2019+ and weak compared to the rest of the build
I personaly don't care about graphics a lot, I never play single palyer games or stuff like battlefield and when i get in a game I put everything on low anyway. Will I miss out on performance a lot if I don't change my 3 year old gtx 1060? Will it like somehow bottleneck my cpu or something?
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
86
9
1,565
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I personaly don't care about graphics a lot, I never play single palyer games or stuff like battlefield and when i get in a game I put everything on low anyway. Will I miss out on performance a lot if I don't change my 3 year old gtx 1060? Will it like somehow bottleneck my cpu or something?
Ok.. I see. GPU cant bottleneck a cpu ir rest of the system. Since you are not a intense gamer 1060 3gb is an option but still recommend you to buy a rx570.
Question: Why you build a system like that if you are not a demanding gamer? Do you work on video editing or developent?
 
Dec 6, 2019
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Why you build a system like that if you are not a demanding gamer?
I do work a lot on video editing and im picking up with some development engines, but that doesn't even matter because leaving that aside;
I am very demanding as a gamer, I only play competitive pvp games and I nee my Overwatch to run at 200 fps at lesat and my Rust to (well, not stutter).
 
Nov 17, 2019
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The cpu wont hold back the 1660 that much but will definitely bottleneck. You could upgrade the CPU to a R5 2600 at least but you have a low end AM4 motherboard and may have issues (generally A320 supports newer ryzen after an BIOS update). You may also have issues with the 4x4 RAM you will have.
The upgrade is overall good but you will need to upgrade the CPU and motherborad in the future. Also if you can, go for the 1660ti and the CX550M (semi modular)
what issues the mobo will cause? I heard mobo has no role in performance
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
86
9
1,565
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what issues the mobo will cause? I heard mobo has no role in performance
It wont cause Performance issues. It may cause some more specific issues like problems on overclocking, problems with ram speed, ram dimms and ram compatibility, sensor and monitoring problems. All these are not sure, its just a posibility when running newer CPUs on older, cheap platforms.
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
86
9
1,565
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I do work a lot on video editing and im picking up with some development engines, but that doesn't even matter because leaving that aside;
I am very demanding as a gamer, I only play competitive pvp games and I nee my Overwatch to run at 200 fps at lesat and my Rust to (well, not stutter).
So you play less demanding titles but at most FPS possible. Search on youtube for benchmarks on graphics cards and choose.I dont think that 1060 3gb can run Rust and Overwatch on 1080p even with the lowest settings.
Rest of the system is really good for the price range, both for tough gaming and video editing.
 
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Dec 6, 2019
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I dont think that 1060 3gb can run Rust and Overwatch on 1080p even with the lowest settings.
Rest of the system is really good for the price range, both for tough gaming and video editing.
Well I've been running overwatch at 115+ fps (for low and ultra graphics same fps) for many years now so Im pretty sure that's not true. Rust is more tricky demanding but it is usually on 70 to 65 fps.
 

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
86
9
1,565
13
Well I've been running overwatch at 115+ fps (for low and ultra graphics same fps) for many years now so Im pretty sure that's not true. Rust is more tricky demanding but it is usually on 70 to 65 fps.
I mean that it can't run these games at 200fps that you want, but if you are ok with the fps you are getting then go for it.The build is fine overall.
 
The main thing which comes to mind is VRMs.

On a cheap/poor motherboard, the VRMs may not be able to supply the consistent power delivery for some CPUs which will in turn cause a fluctuation in performance. If a VRM doesn't get enough cooling (part air flow issue, part quality issue) then it can throttle performance as well. At least from my understanding.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
you mean expensive mobo gives u more fps?
In some cases, and depending on how you look at it, yes.

A motherboard with better VRMs is less likely to throttle under heavy loads, which means a better board, under some circumstances, may give you better FPS because the cheap board may be throttling under those loads and throttling causes a serious drop in performance.

A better board means cleaner power, almost always. Cleaner power usually translates some way or another into higher efficiency and better performance.

A higher quality motherboard will have better capacitor selection, and higher quality capacitors pretty much always results in a higher level of stability. The more stable the platform or configuration is, the smoother things will be and generally speaking you will likely see a bit more performance as well.

Also, factory programmed boost behaviors, or overclocking success, will definitely be impacted by the quality of the board both in terms of power delivery, stability and potential for thermal throttling.

These are all things that can affect performance, and other things such as which network controllers are used on a given board, which storage controllers are used, WHETHER or not secondary storage controllers (Which are often not nearly as good, and thus much cheaper, as the primary controllers) are used and the actual trace design and layout of the board itself can have a very direct impact on the performance of every component, not just the CPU, memory and graphics, but also storage drives, network speeds, audio (And audio problems, especially on some cheap audio chipsets, can ruin an otherwise good board), etc.

There is a reason why tech sites comparatively review motherboards and present benchmarks. Using the exact same memory, CPU, graphics cards and storage devices, with the only thing that is different being the motherboard, there are clear differences in what kind of performance you see on one board versus another so it's ludicrous to ever believe that all boards are created equal in terms of how things will perform.

https://www.hardwarezone.com.sg/feature-intel-z390-motherboard-shootout-which-flagship-board-should-you-get/benchmark-performance-3
 
Nov 17, 2019
25
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In some cases, and depending on how you look at it, yes.

A motherboard with better VRMs is less likely to throttle under heavy loads, which means a better board, under some circumstances, may give you better FPS because the cheap board may be throttling under those loads and throttling causes a serious drop in performance.

A better board means cleaner power, almost always. Cleaner power usually translates some way or another into higher efficiency and better performance.

A higher quality motherboard will have better capacitor selection, and higher quality capacitors pretty much always results in a higher level of stability. The more stable the platform or configuration is, the smoother things will be and generally speaking you will likely see a bit more performance as well.

Also, factory programmed boost behaviors, or overclocking success, will definitely be impacted by the quality of the board both in terms of power delivery, stability and potential for thermal throttling.

These are all things that can affect performance, and other things such as which network controllers are used on a given board, which storage controllers are used, WHETHER or not secondary storage controllers (Which are often not nearly as good, and thus much cheaper, as the primary controllers) are used and the actual trace design and layout of the board itself can have a very direct impact on the performance of every component, not just the CPU, memory and graphics, but also storage drives, network speeds, audio (And audio problems, especially on some cheap audio chipsets, can ruin an otherwise good board), etc.

There is a reason why tech sites comparatively review motherboards and present benchmarks. Using the exact same memory, CPU, graphics cards and storage devices, with the only thing that is different being the motherboard, there are clear differences in what kind of performance you see on one board versus another so it's ludicrous to ever believe that all boards are created equal in terms of how things will perform.

https://www.hardwarezone.com.sg/feature-intel-z390-motherboard-shootout-which-flagship-board-should-you-get/benchmark-performance-3
what if i won't be overclocking and only use 2400 speed ram


it says it doesn't affect performance (except ram speed)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
A large part of the performance on Ryzen comes from the factory boost behavior OR from PBO/2, if you choose to use that on platforms that support it. But even for the stock boost behavior, which has nothing to do with overclocking, it can be a factor. Now, that being said, the point wasn't that YOUR upgrade would realistically benefit from a higher end type board, just that IN GENERAL the motherboard DOES make a difference especially if a high end CPU and memory configuration is being used.

For your 2200G upgrade, I'd probably just stick to an entry level board UNLESS you plan to AGAIN upgrade the CPU at some point in which case THEN it makes little sense to go with a cheap board now that is not going to be a good foundation for that next step later. In that case, go with at least a middling tiered B450 in the 100 dollar range, like the Tomahawk. In fact, for almost anybody building on Ryzen right now, it's almost a waste to do anything less than that if it's to be a gaming system.
 
Reactions: ThilakRoX

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