Question Hard Drive locking up computer

Bond679

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I lost 3 normal hard drives when replacing a power supply. All three normal drives I had in the computer stopped functioning g but the two SSD's continued to work. Testing the drives in other computers confirmed they did not work.
I bought a PCB for one replaced the board and reconnected it to my computer. Now when I power the pc up, I can feel/hear that hard drive functioning, however the computer just goes to a black screen, not even moving to where I can enter bios.
When unplugged, the computer boots as normal.

I am at a loss and any help would be appreciated.
 

punkncat

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There could be a lot of things at play for cause, but the outcome is quite likely to be loss of data without expensive professional services.

Their failure could be an aspect of the previous PSU, assuming its replacement is due to damage.
If this was a modular power supply, if you re-used the cables from one to the other could have caused damage.

HDD are very susceptible to shock, and especially so if running. If you put the case down hard, dropped a drive, even caused a heavy shock pulling cables loose could have damaged them. SSD are not susceptible to shock, even when running.
 

Lafong

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Not sure about your complaint.

What are you "at a loss" about?

You say moving all 3 hard drives to another PC confirmed "they did not work".

Why can't that be true....for whatever reason? You don't think it is true?

Is the problem that the data on them is highly important and you want to recover it?

Do you have any particular reason to think the drives are repairable/recoverable...given that you replaced the PCB on one of them and that your tests in another PC confirmed "they did not work"?
 

Bond679

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The drive in question is a Samsung HD103UJ. To clarify, This is the one I swapped out with a new PCB hoping it would function. It is also the one that when plugged into power and SATA, makes the computer not boot.

USAFRet, yes, you called it, I stuck the new modular PSU in and kept the old cables (not the MB ones) so I probably deserved it.
When I fired up the PSU for the first time I heard a barely audible pop and knew I had screwed up. I incorrectly thought that I could give a test with the old cables before running all the new ones.
All three of my 'normal' drives ceased to function. Now I am trying to repair the most important one.

Thanks Guys
 

USAFRet

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The drive in question is a Samsung HD103UJ. To clarify, This is the one I swapped out with a new PCB hoping it would function. It is also the one that when plugged into power and SATA, makes the computer not boot.

USAFRet, yes, you called it, I stuck the new modular PSU in and kept the old cables (not the MB ones) so I probably deserved it.
When I fired up the PSU for the first time I heard a barely audible pop and knew I had screwed up. I incorrectly thought that I could give a test with the old cables before running all the new ones.
All three of my 'normal' drives ceased to function. Now I am trying to repair the most important one.

Thanks Guys
Modular PSU cables are NOT, repeat NOT, universal.

Cables from PSU A do not go with PSU B.

The damage was done with that first pop.
There is apparently a fuse involved with this, but I do not know the specifics.

@fzakbar may be of assistance.
Do nothing with any PCB until you hear from him.
 

Bond679

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USAFRet, gotcha. Holding for @fzakbar
One question I have is that when the drive was initially non-functional and plugged into the computer, the computer would boot and simply not recognize the drive.
NOW after replacing the pcb, when plugging the drive in it makes noise like it is functional but locks the computer up and will not allow it to boot.
I was wondering what might cause that circumstance?
 

USAFRet

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USAFRet, gotcha. Holding for @fzakbar
One question I have is that when the drive was initially non-functional and plugged into the computer, the computer would boot and simply not recognize the drive.
NOW after replacing the pcb, when plugging the drive in it makes noise like it is functional but locks the computer up and will not allow it to boot.
I was wondering what might cause that circumstance?
Changing the PCB also changed that blown fuse. Thereby allowing at least an initial spinup.

But, with some drives, PCBs are not interchangeable. Even among the same make/model.
Some may have different BIOS, or the BIOS chip may need to be transplanted from old to new.
 
The most likely problem is that the 5V TVS diode is shorted and the 5V "fuse" (zero-ohm resistor) is open. You need to measure their resistances on the 200 ohms range of a multimeter.

http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/HDD/HD103UJ_TVS.jpg

TVS Diode FAQ:
http://www.hddoracle.com/viewtopic.php?f=100&t=86

I'm a bit concerned about the possibility of internal damage, for example a damaged preamp on the headstack. Alternatively, if your replacement PCB did not come from the same model with the same firmware version, then that may explain why the BIOS stalls during the POST.
 

Bond679

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fzabkar, I ordered the same model PCB but did not understand to get one with the correct firmware. The two main chips (which I assume are the BIOS) on the boards have slightly different numbers.

Must admit I don't really remember the last time I checked a diode but I gave it my best shot..

The 12VTVS measures .654 when placing red away from the power source and open when placed near.
The 5VTVS shows .000 and makes a noise when measured from both directions.
The 5V fuse measures .123 both directions.

I hope I have done that correctly and it makes sense.
 
Your 5V diode is shorted, so you need to remove it. You can use flush cutters to do this if you're not handy with a soldering iron.

The fuse should read 0.0 ohms on the 200 ohms scale of the meter. It appears to be open. You can replace it with a 2 amp fuse, or you can simply flow a blob of solder over it.

If there is no other damage, your drive should work without the diode, but it will no longer be protected from overvoltages. If you wish to replace the diode, you can use an SMAJ5.0A.

The preamp inside the drive is powered from a +5V and a -5V supply. You can test the resistances between ground and each of these supplies by measuring the resistances of each of the 4 vertically facing capacitors between the 2 rows of 10 pins just above the square 1R2 coil at the mid RHS of this photo:

https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/Hc08d14845d0747dfad1abb9a3106a43eV/BF41-00185B-Hard-Drive-PCB-Logic-Circuit-Board-for-Samsung-HD753LJ.jpg

I expect that the resistances should be at least 100 ohms. You should leave the PCB on the drive when performing these measurements.

I would also measure the voltages at the pins of your SATA connector to confirm that the PSU is working properly.

https://pinoutguide.com/Power/sata-power_pinout.shtml
 

Bond679

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Fzabkar, so I can 'bridge' across that diode for temporary functionality (with the caveat being there will be no overvoltage protection) if there are no other problems with the drive?
 

Bond679

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Well sir I will be free again mid next week and will make my best attempt.
Regardless of if I succeed or fail I must say you lot have been beyond helpful and I thank you for spending your time to help me.
Ill let y'all know how it goes!
 

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