Question Hard Drive spins after PCB replacement but is not recognized

Jan 16, 2020
6
0
10
0
So after a faulty PSU killed my hard drive a couple of years ago, I knew it was a PCB failure, I recently ordered a matching PCB and replaced the BIOS chip. As the hard drive spun I was excited for it to open, but it never did. It shows up on device manager but the gives error code 10, it also doesn’t show up as a formattable storage. Any idea on what else to do?
 
Jan 16, 2020
6
0
10
0
It's a Toshiba MK7559GSXF, after using an ohmmeter to check the PCB, I realized that there's a blown Fuse on the original PCB rather than a TVS diode. Would you think that it would be a good idea to transfer the BIOS chip back to the original pcb along with the fuse?
Also it is not detected by data recovery programs
 
Toshiba's drives have bad protection. It could be that the preamp on the headstack is damaged. In any case, there would be no point in returning the ROM to the original PCB.

BTW, you must not damage the ROM. I know of no-one who can recover your data in such cases.

One thing you could do as an investigative measure is to bridge the fuse on the damaged board, after confirming that there are no shorts to ground at this point. Don't bother replacing the "BIOS" -- just measure the voltages between ground and each of the L3 and L2 coils. I expect that you'll find +3.3V and +1.2V. If so, then this means that the motor controller (IC301) most probably survived.
 
That could be right. My numbers were only a guess based on the approximate age of the drive.

The Vcore voltage in today's hardware is now around 1.0V and the Vio voltage went from 3.3V to 2.5V, and is now at 1.8V. In fact I think that the SDRAM IC is a 2.5V part, so that would be consistent with your measurements.

I still don't think there is any point in returning the ROM to the original board, but I could be wrong.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS