Question hard drive stops writing after a while

Mar 17, 2020
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i have an 8TB seagate hard drive which, after being tasked to transfer several GBs of files, grinds to a halt and the writing speed drops to 2-3 MBs. i have run a test to check for bad sectors and nothing came up as damaged. the hard drive has no problem reading for long periods of time, but it does when it comes to writing
 
Mar 17, 2020
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If it's only the writing speed that's affected it may be the source drive that's faulty.
if by source drive you mean the boot drive, then i don't think so. i have multiple drives in my system and the one acting up is a secondary drive. none of the other drives have this issue
 
Mar 17, 2020
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By "source drive" I mean the drive from which files were being transferred or copied.

If you suspect the destination drive (ie the 8TB Seagate drive) may be faulty you can test it with "SeaTools for Windows":


You can also test the source drive with it as SeaTools can test any make of HDD.
all indications point towards the destination drive being at fault
i have tested the drive with seagate's tools with the results saying the drive is working fine, additionally i made a bootable usb with their tools and chose the setting which tries to fix any bad sectors it finds. it run for around 16 hours in order to be completed
the main issue is that there is obviously something wrong with the drive, but any program i test it with says it's working properly
 
Is the 8 TB drive in question an internal drive? (you might try both a different SATA pwr and SATA data cable, as well as a different port on the mainboard, just to rule those out...; if an external USB drive, some alleged USB 3.0 spec drives' circuitry overheats at those speeds in sustained use, leading to anemic throttling, try a USB 2.0 spec port, which , although slower, will not throttle as drastically and end up faster overall transfer of large collection of data
 
Mar 17, 2020
11
0
10
0
Is the 8 TB drive in question an internal drive? (you might try both a different SATA pwr and SATA data cable, as well as a different port on the mainboard, just to rule those out...; if an external USB drive, some alleged USB 3.0 spec drives' circuitry overheats at those speeds in sustained use, leading to anemic throttling, try a USB 2.0 spec port, which , although slower, will not throttle as drastically and end up faster overall transfer of large collection of data
it's an internal drive
i switched both sata cables and ports but to no avail
i'd think it would be a physical problem if made ticking noises, but it doesn't
 

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