[SOLVED] Having SSD problems, can't understand why my sata ports are getting rearranged

cloudropis_1

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My PC suddenly crashes giving me a "Reboot and select proper boot device" black screen, making me turn off the PC, access BIOS, find out the boot priority is all out of order, set it right again, reboot, system works great until the next crash. Started two days ago, happened once a day so far.
I have been running tests and I can conclude it's the SSD acting up. As I'm working towards getting a new one, the one thing that bothers me the most is that the disk labels are out of order.
For example, this is crystaldiskinfo's page:
View: https://imgur.com/a/wxD68Rw

It's listing them as E: C: D: when before the first crash they were were always ordered correctly as C: (SSD in question, system drive) D: E:. When I hover the mouse on them, the "disk x", which afaik are not related to the OS but to the sata ports on the mobo itself, have also been rearranged!
In other words, before the first crash it was C: disk 0, D: disk 1, E: disk 2, now it's E: disk 0, C: disk 1, D: disk 2, even though I haven't changed the sata ports on the mobo at all! Diskpart lists them like this too.
As I've mentioned, I'm getting a new SSD and reinstalling windows there, but now I'm a bit worried about this weird disk reordering, I don't wanna risk reinstalling windows on D: (personal data drive) because it's now seen as disk 0 or something like that.
 
Disk numbers don't matter.
For example, if you have windows 7 and windows 10 installed on the same computer, same physical disk on win7 can be disk 1 and disk 3 in win10.

Every time you connect additional disk, boot priority in BIOS can change. You have to verify boot priority settings every time a new disk is connected.

But if boot priority changes without adding a new disk, then perhaps BIOS battery has died and you need to change it.
 
Disk numbers don't matter.
For example, if you have windows 7 and windows 10 installed on the same computer, same physical disk on win7 can be disk 1 and disk 3 in win10.

Every time you connect additional disk, boot priority in BIOS can change. You have to verify boot priority settings every time a new disk is connected.

But if boot priority changes without adding a new disk, then perhaps BIOS battery has died and you need to change it.
 

cloudropis_1

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Disk numbers don't matter.
For example, if you have windows 7 and windows 10 installed on the same computer, same physical disk on win7 can be disk 1 and disk 3 in win10.

Every time you connect additional disk, boot priority in BIOS can change. You have to verify boot priority settings every time a new disk is connected.

But if boot priority changes without adding a new disk, then perhaps BIOS battery has died and you need to change it.
Mobo is pretty new, has like one year and a couple of months, is that still likely?
Is there a way to rearrange disk numbers for personal peace of mind, without making windows go crazy?
 
Mobo is pretty new, has like one year and a couple of months, is that still likely?
Is there a way to rearrange disk numbers for personal peace of mind, without making windows go crazy?
Unless you physically rearrange disks, disk numbers don't change but their letters can be changed in the OS.
Contemporary UEFI/ BIOS will automatically try to BOOT from first disk it finds boot sector or UEFI partition. If a disk is late to activate during post, bios will look for next disk to boot from.
Can you show a picture of your Disk Management ?
 

cloudropis_1

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Unless you physically rearrange disks, disk numbers don't change but their letters can be changed in the OS.
Contemporary UEFI/ BIOS will automatically try to BOOT from first disk it finds boot sector or UEFI partition. If a disk is late to activate during post, bios will look for next disk to boot from.
Can you show a picture of your Disk Management ?
Sorry I'm late
View: https://imgur.com/AdcoEL6

C: is the 120gb SSD OS drive. D: (1tb) and E: (2gb) are the personal data HDDs. As you can see, E: is seen as disk 0, when it should usually be disk 2 while C: is disk 0
 

cloudropis_1

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Only way you can change that is to change their connections to MB. I don't see a reason to have to do that though.
Curious to find out how it happened in the first place as I didn't touch the SATAs at all when it all went down
Either way, got new SSD, I'll just reinstall Windows and rearrange the other SATAs for pure comfortableness
 

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