HDD Decrypting Cannot be Enforced by U.S. Prosecutors

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This is worded just so incorrectly from a legal standpoint. Just awful.
 

SpadeM

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Had there been proof that the defendant obtained child pornography, he could have been forced to provide the decrypted data.
What is the definition of force in this case? I doubt it's water boarding :p but then again it is America ...
 

juncture

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[citation][nom]fish1932989[/nom]This is worded just so incorrectly from a legal standpoint. Just awful.[/citation]Yeah, people can actually understand it now.
 

COLGeek

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[citation][nom]fish1932989[/nom]This is worded just so incorrectly from a legal standpoint. Just awful.[/citation]
For better wording, read the PDF linked as the source of the article.

This is an interesting case. It seems odd that the govt didn't clone his HDDs and decrypt (various means to do so including brute force).
 
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You dont need 'proof' of childporn on the hard drive. That is not the court's standard among other things..

 

memadmax

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The canadians had the same issue regarding a guy that had a "boot up password" on his laptop....

They couldn't force him to give up his password, so he managed to get out of it.

The same goes with this.

They can't force you to give up your password.
 

memadmax

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Also, any form of "bruteforce" is still a 5 year endeavor, even with the most powerful supercomputers doing the number crunching.... this puts it past the "statute of limitations"....

Until they get a computer that can do several trillion tries a second, that is also widely available, you are safe on bruteforce. But by then, I suppose they would find a more secure means of encrypting data.
 

rozz

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[citation][nom]COLGeek[/nom]For better wording, read the PDF linked as the source of the article. This is an interesting case. It seems odd that the govt didn't clone his HDDs and decrypt (various means to do so including brute force).[/citation]
Yeah Brute force wont get them anywhere. You're talking tens if not hundreds of years with a simple 128bit encrypted drive.

And that's with tons of GPUs cracking at it..

Curious.. did they try "12345" as the password?
 

captjack5169

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[citation][nom]rozz[/nom]Yeah Brute force wont get them anywhere. You're talking tens if not hundreds of years with a simple 128bit encrypted drive.And that's with tons of GPUs cracking at it.. Curious.. did they try "12345" as the password?[/citation]

This +1 I chuckled
 

rozz

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[citation][nom]memadmax[/nom]Also, any form of "bruteforce" is still a 5 year endeavor, even with the most powerful supercomputers doing the number crunching.... this puts it past the "statute of limitations"....Until they get a computer that can do several trillion tries a second, that is also widely available, you are safe on bruteforce. But by then, I suppose they would find a more secure means of encrypting data.[/citation]
ENCRYPT ALL DRIVES WITH 512BIT QUICK BEFORE GOVERNMENT INVENTS QUANTUM COMPUTING!
 

COLGeek

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I will only say this in regard to cracking these passwords. They can certainly be cracked with the proper tools in far less time than you might think. This might even be a good topic for Tom's to look into.

The bottom line, don't feel too secure with these tools. What math can put together, math can take apart. Think about it.....
 

memadmax

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I want to add something to my "laptop password" rationale....

If you add a "boot up password" to any system.... yea sure, they could take the hard drive out and try to get into the contents thru another system...

But, this has its drawbacks: The system, in its original form, would be compromised. This opens up the defense to such things as "what if they planted data on the hard drive after it was removed from the original system" and so on and so forth...
 

COLGeek

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Strike one for citizens rights and the Constitution.
Scumbag lawyers. cops and judges, especially pigs, I mean cops, are liars of the worse kind. They all hang out together and have drinks, this includes politicians too.
Anger issues? Not exactly a great addition to the discussion.
 

drwho1

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This is interesting...
But at the same time, If I suspect of someone has child porn, I would probably would try to find other ways to get the facts straight before arrest him in the first place.

Maybe a simple court order to "sniff" on his computers should have been enough.
(predators would simply not stop doing what they do) and they could have tracked his "whereabouts" online, that would be proof enough to get access to his dirty drive.

OR proof that they were wrong and move along...
 

gm0n3y

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I still don't understand how 'I forgot my password' isn't a valid defence. Sure it's perjury, but there is no way to prove it and if you're already storing child porn you probably aren't too concerned with breaking the law.
 

upgrade_1977

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Right, just like they can't search your car, or come into your home without a reason. But as we are seeing in many video's on the internet, those rights a broken all the time by government and police. Just saying..
 

rozz

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[citation][nom]COLGeek[/nom]I will only say this in regard to cracking these passwords. They can certainly be cracked with the proper tools in far less time than you might think. This might even be a good topic for Tom's to look into.The bottom line, don't feel too secure with these tools. What math can put together, math can take apart. Think about it.....[/citation]
Not necessarily.. Even with Microsoft's Bitlocker, it is nearly impossible to decrypt an entire drive with 128bit encryption. Especially if you add a diffuser to your encryption, there is no possibly way to figure out the encryption. Once you think you start to get the encryption.. diffuser just messes you all up again. Kinda fascinating reading into it a little. Sure there are "spoofs" you can do like pulling the dram out while it's still hot and getting the algorithm off it, but that's not practical. Math may of put it together.. but you have to understand the math to take it back apart.
 
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You know if it was so easy to brute force attack encryption none of our internet business deals would be safe from banking to online shopping. You can bet that if the US government can attack encryption so can hackers in China and Russia.
 

captjack5169

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[citation][nom]rozz[/nom]Not necessarily.. Even with Microsoft's Bitlocker, it is nearly impossible to decrypt an entire drive with 128bit encryption. Especially if you add a diffuser to your encryption, there is no possibly way to figure out the encryption. Once you think you start to get the encryption.. diffuser just messes you all up again. Kinda fascinating reading into it a little. Sure there are "spoofs" you can do like pulling the dram out while it's still hot and getting the algorithm off it, but that's not practical. Math may of put it together.. but you have to understand the math to take it back apart.[/citation][citation][nom]COLGeek[/nom]I will only say this in regard to cracking these passwords. They can certainly be cracked with the proper tools in far less time than you might think. This might even be a good topic for Tom's to look into.The bottom line, don't feel too secure with these tools. What math can put together, math can take apart. Think about it.....[/citation]

Ok I have thought about about and you need to research you what you are suggesting, because I am pretty sure you have not thought about it. Depending on what encryption software and method you are using and the length of the password, we can start talking in milleniums right now. Its not easy. If it was no would bother encrypting and I for one would be out of a job. So if you have some ease method for breaking say AES encryption I would love a citation because we are all going to want to know how you did it.
 

captjack5169

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[citation][nom]drwho1[/nom]This is interesting...But at the same time, If I suspect of someone has child porn, I would probably would try to find other ways to get the facts straight before arrest him in the first place.Maybe a simple court order to "sniff" on his computers should have been enough.(predators would simply not stop doing what they do) and they could have tracked his "whereabouts" online, that would be proof enough to get access to his dirty drive.OR proof that they were wrong and move along...[/citation] I totally agree the plan would be more successful to catch him or her while they are at home and the computer is on and unencrypted.
 
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