[SOLVED] HDD Died, Windows Struggles Now.

CDDogg

Honorable
Aug 20, 2015
252
3
10,815
19
So a few months back one of my internal HDDs started having issues, and it eventually died. It wasn't my C: drive so it dying posed no obvious threat to my OS.

So I disconnected it, recovered anything important that I could, and since then I haven't replaced it (I have 2 other HDDs so it's not an issue).

I wasn't running it in an array of any kind, and I don't believe I have any software that needed to read anything off of it.

However, since I disconnected it, Startup and Windows File Exploration has been terribly slow. I have a 1TB SSD as my C: drive, so usually everything would go relatively quickly, but it's really been struggling since that drive began having problems.

Currently it takes about a minute to startup completely (very unusual, I used to be able to expect it to startup completely in a matter of seconds). Even when it does startup and I log in, it takes another solid minute for Windows Explorer to start working properly. Occasionally throughout the day Windows Explorer will get stuck in a crashing loop, sometimes lasting as long as 10 minutes. and if I edit/save a file anywhere, Windows Explorer will stop responding for another solid few minutes.

My guess is that a registry somewhere is still expecting to see that drive active, and I'm sure it's a vital part of some file check Windows Explorer is doing.

Has anyone else experienced this kind of issue, is there a semi-standard way to fix this kind of thing?
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
It sounds like the drive was connected when you installed Windows. Part of the Windows installation was written there (even though your specified the C Drive). Now that the drive is gone, Windows is having issues.

Best thing you can do now is to back up your data, remove the extra drives, leaving only the SSD connected, and performing a clean install of Windows.

-Wolf sends
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
It sounds like the drive was connected when you installed Windows. Part of the Windows installation was written there (even though your specified the C Drive). Now that the drive is gone, Windows is having issues.

Best thing you can do now is to back up your data, remove the extra drives, leaving only the SSD connected, and performing a clean install of Windows.

-Wolf sends
 

CDDogg

Honorable
Aug 20, 2015
252
3
10,815
19
Ah yes, that checks out.

It was connected during my windows installation, I was just hoping there was a better solution given how often HDDs die randomly.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS