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Question Hello Fellow Gamers.

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
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My graphics card is worse than i even imagined. I checked User Benchmark finally and its just awful. Right now, I use an NVIDIA GeForce GT 730 and it really explains why almost nothing runs well on my pc (if Amnesia the Dark Descent is running at 55 fps i know its just crap). I just upgraded my CPU to an Intel i5-8400 which is nice, but with a bad graphics card i really can't make it anywhere. What compatible upgrades can i get from the price range of $100-$200? https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/25605204
 
What compatible upgrades can i get from the price range of $100-$200?
At the top-end of that range, you could get a GTX 1660, though currently I only see a couple models for $200 or less, both with a single fan cooler. It might be worth stretching that a bit to the dual-fan model listed by ArchitSahu, which might run a little quieter under load. Or to a 1660 SUPER, which should be around 10-15% faster than the non-SUPER models.

GTX 1660 / 1660 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=439,450

Below that, the GTX 1650 SUPER, RX 5500 XT or RX 580 might be worth considering, as on average they should typically perform only around 15% or so behind that card in most demanding games. The lowest-performing card I would consider within that price range would be an RX 570, which typically performs another 15% or so behind those other cards, but can often be found at a lower price point. The RX 580 is the most power-hungry of these cards under load, and puts out the most heat, which might be worth considering, particularly if you have a lower-end power supply in your system.

GTX 1650 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=476

RX 5500 XT: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=478

RX 580: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=391

RX 570: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=392

Edit: Oh, and compared to a GT 730, even an RX 570 can be upward of 8 times as fast in graphically-demanding games, so any of these cards would be a massive upgrade over what you have.
 
Last edited:

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
At the top-end of that range, you could get a GTX 1660, though currently I only see a couple models for $200 or less, both with a single fan cooler. It might be worth stretching that a bit to the dual-fan model listed by ArchitSahu, which might run a little quieter under load. Or to a 1660 SUPER, which should be around 10-15% faster than the non-SUPER models.

GTX 1660 / 1660 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=439,450

Below that, the GTX 1650 SUPER, RX 5500 XT or RX 580 might be worth considering, as on average they should typically perform only around 15% or so behind that card in most demanding games. The lowest-performing card I would consider within that price range would be an RX 570, which typically performs another 15% or so behind those other cards, but can often be found at a lower price point. The RX 580 is the most power-hungry of these cards under load, and puts out the most heat, which might be worth considering, particularly if you have a lower-end power supply in your system.

GTX 1650 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=476

RX 5500 XT: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=478

RX 580: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=391

RX 570: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=392

Edit: Oh, and compared to a GT 730, even an RX 570 can be upward of 8 times as fast in graphically-demanding games, so any of these cards would be a massive upgrade over what you have.
Thank you very much, however I have some limitations I have just discovered in my upgrade selection. Due to the pre-built nature of my machine, the power supply is enclosed in what seems like a irremovable metal plate, which means any gpu connections aren't possible, as the one i have now runs without external power. So i've done some quick research on upgrades available without external power connections, and it seems the GTX 1650 is the most recommended option. What do you think?
 

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
At the top-end of that range, you could get a GTX 1660, though currently I only see a couple models for $200 or less, both with a single fan cooler. It might be worth stretching that a bit to the dual-fan model listed by ArchitSahu, which might run a little quieter under load. Or to a 1660 SUPER, which should be around 10-15% faster than the non-SUPER models.

GTX 1660 / 1660 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=439,450

Below that, the GTX 1650 SUPER, RX 5500 XT or RX 580 might be worth considering, as on average they should typically perform only around 15% or so behind that card in most demanding games. The lowest-performing card I would consider within that price range would be an RX 570, which typically performs another 15% or so behind those other cards, but can often be found at a lower price point. The RX 580 is the most power-hungry of these cards under load, and puts out the most heat, which might be worth considering, particularly if you have a lower-end power supply in your system.

GTX 1650 SUPER: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=476

RX 5500 XT: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=478

RX 580: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=391

RX 570: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#sort=price&c=392

Edit: Oh, and compared to a GT 730, even an RX 570 can be upward of 8 times as fast in graphically-demanding games, so any of these cards would be a massive upgrade over what you have.
Also keep in mind my PSU only has 220 watts so i am VERY limited, i hear a 1650 may not be the best idea.
 
Yeah, I believe that may currently be the fastest card available with models that don't require external power. If the PSU were not a concern, it doesn't make much sense at this point, seeing as a 1650 SUPER typically costs just a little more for around 30% more performance, but that card also draws more power. The 1650 (non-super) performs behind the RX 570 as well, but that card can draw more than twice as much power under load. A 1650 will still offer multiple times the performance of what you have, of course, and should be capable of running just about any current game at 1080p, provided you are willing to lower settings in demanding titles.

As for the power requirements of a 1650, I suspect you should be able to get away with that 220 watt PSU, assuming the motherboard can supply enough power through the PCIe slot. A 1650 only draws around 70 watts under load, and the other components in your system probably won't push total power draw from the PSU to over 200 watts while gaming. Just make sure it's a version of the card without a power connector though, as some require them. And of course, make sure it physically fits in your case, if it's a small case.

I do suspect the PSU is probably replaceable though, otherwise it would be difficult for the manufacturer to do warranty repairs on the system. Are you saying it's hidden behind a metal shroud? What case is this, or model of PC if you don't know the specific case? Perhaps a photo of the "irremovable metal plate" could be helpful. Have you checked if the right-panel on the opposite side of the case might be removable to access the PSU?
 

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
Yeah, I believe that may currently be the fastest card available with models that don't require external power. If the PSU were not a concern, it doesn't make much sense at this point, seeing as a 1650 SUPER typically costs just a little more for around 30% more performance, but that card also draws more power. The 1650 (non-super) performs behind the RX 570 as well, but that card can draw more than twice as much power under load. A 1650 will still offer multiple times the performance of what you have, of course, and should be capable of running just about any current game at 1080p, provided you are willing to lower settings in demanding titles.

As for the power requirements of a 1650, I suspect you should be able to get away with that 220 watt PSU, assuming the motherboard can supply enough power through the PCIe slot. A 1650 only draws around 70 watts under load, and the other components in your system probably won't push total power draw from the PSU to over 200 watts while gaming. Just make sure it's a version of the card without a power connector though, as some require them. And of course, make sure it physically fits in your case, if it's a small case.

I do suspect the PSU is probably replaceable though, otherwise it would be difficult for the manufacturer to do warranty repairs on the system. Are you saying it's hidden behind a metal shroud? What case is this, or model of PC if you don't know the specific case? Perhaps a photo of the "irremovable metal plate" could be helpful. Have you checked if the right-panel on the opposite side of the case might be removable to access the PSU?
I was able to unscrew the PSU from the case and open it up to see the fan, but only that. I checked through the fan and didn't see any connections for a gpu, or in that matter any way to make additional connections. I believe an upgrade in PSU would be the only option if i really wanted to do that, but the case seems modeled to this PSU, as it locks in in a very specific way. I'll crack it open in the morning and take a picture to give an idea what im working with.

Here's the link to the model:
https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/desktops-and-all-in-ones/thinkcentre/m-series-towers/ThinkCentre-M720t/p/11TC1MDM72T
 

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
Yeah, I believe that may currently be the fastest card available with models that don't require external power. If the PSU were not a concern, it doesn't make much sense at this point, seeing as a 1650 SUPER typically costs just a little more for around 30% more performance, but that card also draws more power. The 1650 (non-super) performs behind the RX 570 as well, but that card can draw more than twice as much power under load. A 1650 will still offer multiple times the performance of what you have, of course, and should be capable of running just about any current game at 1080p, provided you are willing to lower settings in demanding titles.

As for the power requirements of a 1650, I suspect you should be able to get away with that 220 watt PSU, assuming the motherboard can supply enough power through the PCIe slot. A 1650 only draws around 70 watts under load, and the other components in your system probably won't push total power draw from the PSU to over 200 watts while gaming. Just make sure it's a version of the card without a power connector though, as some require them. And of course, make sure it physically fits in your case, if it's a small case.

I do suspect the PSU is probably replaceable though, otherwise it would be difficult for the manufacturer to do warranty repairs on the system. Are you saying it's hidden behind a metal shroud? What case is this, or model of PC if you don't know the specific case? Perhaps a photo of the "irremovable metal plate" could be helpful. Have you checked if the right-panel on the opposite side of the case might be removable to access the PSU?
This is what I'm looking for, right?
https://www.newegg.com/msi-geforce-gtx-1650-gtx-1650-4gt-lp-oc/p/N82E16814137480?item=N82E16814137480&source=region&nm_mc=knc-googleadwords-pc&cm_mmc=knc-googleadwords-pc-_-pla-_-video+card+-+nvidia-_-N82E16814137480&gclid=Cj0KCQjw09HzBRDrARIsAG60GP-qDV-s01_eoBBenVjcLkC5po2sLa8xioG9JyDdpMl9PnFU6zwvpMsaAjwIEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
You won't be running any type of gaming card on that 220 watt power supply reliably. Your wattage rating is under ideal conditions, without really accounting for temperature or any other power loss due to efficiency. You can try a low power gaming card but don't be surprised if you get crashes or lock-ups.

Outside of selling your system and getting one made for upgrades, you can measure the area around the power supply and the power supply and see what is on the market that will fit in the spot. They make SFX size small power supplies for small systems that may fit. You may need to do some modding of the case to make a replacement. You also need to check the power connections on the system to see if they are standard ATX one, if not you will need to see if they make adapters for your model.

The reality is that before buying something you need to do some research to make sure what you get is what you want and will be good for your use. Many home and office systems are not designed with upgrades in mind so use custom shapes and connectors and weaker power supplies.
 
This is what I'm looking for, right?
If your case has room for the thickness of the cooler (the card is two PCIe slots thick) it may work. Does your PC's case use a thin (small form-factor) design?

Knowing more information about what computer hardware you have could be helpful. And if it's a specific model of prebuilt system, one could search online to see if others have had success upgrading to a card with similar power draw. It's likely that a graphics card with a 75 watt TDP should run on a 220 watt PSU, though that could depend a bit on things like the other hardware in the system, and the quality of the PSU.
 

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
If your case has room for the thickness of the cooler (the card is two PCIe slots thick) it may work. Does your PC's case use a thin (small form-factor) design?

Knowing more information about what computer hardware you have could be helpful. And if it's a specific model of prebuilt system, one could search online to see if others have had success upgrading to a card with similar power draw. It's likely that a graphics card with a 75 watt TDP should run on a 220 watt PSU, though that could depend a bit on things like the other hardware in the system, and the quality of the PSU.
Others on the store page claim that it ran fine with around a 200w PSU, and i did measurements inside the case and it will physically fit.
 

dfreeman22

Prominent
Mar 3, 2019
32
1
535
0
If your case has room for the thickness of the cooler (the card is two PCIe slots thick) it may work. Does your PC's case use a thin (small form-factor) design?

Knowing more information about what computer hardware you have could be helpful. And if it's a specific model of prebuilt system, one could search online to see if others have had success upgrading to a card with similar power draw. It's likely that a graphics card with a 75 watt TDP should run on a 220 watt PSU, though that could depend a bit on things like the other hardware in the system, and the quality of the PSU.
Others online also claim that the upgrade worked fine for their pre-built systems.
 

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