Question help dont know whats wrong

Jul 5, 2019
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Okay so the problem is that i bought my self a gaming computer last Christmas but unfortunatly it isn’t working properly.

The matter is that often when I turn the pc on or off its going straight to the bsod (blue screen of death) mode and the counter never goes above 0 so I have to reboot it my self... also when I open some games or close them it happens asweel also rarely when I am in game but it happens.
that keep happening up to around a mounth. but after a certain amount of time the pc wont start windows and keep saying using auto repair until i get mad and just reinstall everything but that doesnt last for ever because only a few days after it start slowly with a few bsod a day and keeps comming more often as i use the pc more frequently...

my specs
Gpu : Asus gaming geforce gtx trio x
cpu: intel Gore i7 9700 k
Ram: corsair vengeance Pro 3200 MHz 2x8gb
motherboard: Asus mpg z390
Psu: corsair hx 750 platinum
m2 ssd: corsair mp 510 960 gb
Cooling
4-5 x corsair ll140 rgb
And a gammaxx gr AS CPU Cooper

I dont really know whats going on so i would apreciate any form for help that could get me to a perminet solution other than just buying a new bc this pc cost me 2.5 euro so i really dont wanna trash it after only a half year
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

So even after clean installs, the problem gradually gets worse?
Do you have the ability to boot into Windows at the moment? If so, it may be worth downloading HD Sentinel and verifying the integrity of your storage drive to ensure it's not faulty.
It may also be worth running memtest to verify the memory is faulting first.
 
Jul 5, 2019
16
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Welcome to the forums my friend!

So even after clean installs, the problem gradually gets worse?
Do you have the ability to boot into Windows at the moment? If so, it may be worth downloading HD Sentinel and verifying the integrity of your storage drive to ensure it's not faulty.
It may also be worth running memtest to verify the memory is faulting first.
unfortunatly i need to reinstall as of right now so i would really apreciate if you know how i could boot windows without the need of a reinstall ?
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
unfortunatly i need to reinstall as of right now so i would really apreciate if you know how i could boot windows without the need of a reinstall ?
If you cannot access windows, then you can run memtest without it. It is on a bootable USB. You just need to download it from another PC.
If you cannot access windows at all, then there is not much else you can do unless you created a bootable OS to run from.
 
Jul 5, 2019
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If you cannot access windows, then you can run memtest without it. It is on a bootable USB. You just need to download it from another PC.
If you cannot access windows at all, then there is not much else you can do unless you created a bootable OS to run from.
okay so i godt access to my computer but what is a memtest? and how do i do one?
 
Jul 5, 2019
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Agreed.

OP if you can run HD sentinel as stated above, it will at least indicate if anything is obviously wrong.
https://www.hdsentinel.com/
I wil do after the memory test but don’t think it will fix this because I had an normal ssd from my old counputer which I at the start was running with my new parts and but when I did go to the control panel my old cpu was appearing as if it was thatcpu I had now don’t know why but then I got the new m2 and That fixes the problem with the wrong cpu appearing but it still made bsod and stuff like that
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Memtest does test CPU caches as well, but doesn't necessarily distinguish as such, they look like memory addresses referenced to me and even then, memory errors can cause CPU errors.

I cannot see the image overly clearly on my device, but this appears to be a memory error.
CPU errors are much rarer too.

Memtest does not distinguish between CPU and Memory errors, it just tests and produces errors. It isn't actually stating that the CPU is the faulting item in the image above.

Please be aware that not all errors reported by MemTest86 are due to bad memory. The test implicitly tests the CPU, L1 and L2 caches as well as the motherboard. It is impossible for the test to determine what causes the failure to occur. However, most failures will be due to a problem with memory module. When it is not, the only option is to replace parts until the failure is corrected.
 
Jul 5, 2019
16
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Memtest does test CPU caches as well, but doesn't necessarily distinguish as such, they look like memory addresses referenced to me and even then, memory errors can cause CPU errors.

I cannot see the image overly clearly on my device, but this appears to be a memory error.
CPU errors are much rarer too.
Okay but the text says “test: 7 address: 1c3f9aed4 Expected: FFFFFFFE Actual: FFEFFFFE CPU 1” so therefore i just thought it was a cpu error?
 

gn842a

Respectable
Oct 10, 2016
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I've got my OS running on an M.2 NVMe and I must say I am a little skeptical about it. Your system description says "cooling" but it doesn't really say how the cooling is going on. If you have CPU cooling that is of course a great thing to have but it seems to me these M.2s are vulnerable to over-heating. This being the situation--perhaps I am overstepping in this view--I would think that you might want to review how well ventilated your case is.

Because BSOD and sudden shut downs while operating feels like thermal issues to me. It doesn't have to be in the CPU. I was getting spontaneous shut downs on my old build because the power supply was overheating. I discovered upon inspection that even though I had kept the case meticulously clean, I had forgotten the fan intake on the bottom of the case! The psu's intake was really clogged with dust. So it was overheating and shutting down. That was a very noob error on my part. I blew that case out twice a year. Just never thought to tilt it over and look at the bottom.

Anyhow you might consider a standard 500 gig SSD loaded with the OS in a Bay off the motherboard. It is true you lose the advantage of PCIe but at least you'll still be in the game.

What is really difficult to assess in these situations is the components. We want to assume that everything is OK and some one factor is contributing to the problem, but as is clear, you could be having a CPU issue, an M.2 issue, or a PSU issue. You might consider going to Newegg.com with a list of the components in your build and reading the ratings very carefully, particularly ratings for any component that is getting less than 90% approval rate (add 4 and 5 star ratings together). In these situations it pays to read some of the very detailed posts put up by people who, at least in some cases, know what they're talking about. Sometimes yo can get a helpful hint.

Many of those people are here too so you're in the right place. But I'm thinking you should try to identify the weak component.

The other thing that you might consider doing--and I know this may seem excessive--is having two computers. I have been maintaining two desktops in this household since 2013 and it is very valuable to be able to evaluate components individually on a different system. There may be fancy diagnostic tools that will give better information but there is nothing more solid, as a help in diagnosis: My computer works upstairs, when I put this part in, it doesn't work, when I put the part that is upstairs in to the computer downstairs, the downstairs computer works. For some issues, however, particularly the mobo and cpu, this may not be helpful.

Greg N
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Okay but the text says “test: 7 address: 1c3f9aed4 Expected: FFFFFFFE Actual: FFEFFFFE CPU 1” so therefore i just thought it was a cpu error?
No, this is basically stipulating the actual address the CPU requested the memory controller to access.

Memtest cannot detect what component exactly caused the error. And ultimately, CPU failure is rare, memory failure is common, memtest is geared to find memory errors.

Anyone who ever encounters an error on memtest, it is memory modules 99.99% of the time.
Even overclocks can cause errors.
 
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Jul 5, 2019
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I've got my OS running on an M.2 NVMe and I must say I am a little skeptical about it. Your system description says "cooling" but it doesn't really say how the cooling is going on. If you have CPU cooling that is of course a great thing to have but it seems to me these M.2s are vulnerable to over-heating. This being the situation--perhaps I am overstepping in this view--I would think that you might want to review how well ventilated your case is.

Because BSOD and sudden shut downs while operating feels like thermal issues to me. It doesn't have to be in the CPU. I was getting spontaneous shut downs on my old build because the power supply was overheating. I discovered upon inspection that even though I had kept the case meticulously clean, I had forgotten the fan intake on the bottom of the case! The psu's intake was really clogged with dust. So it was overheating and shutting down. That was a very noob error on my part. I blew that case out twice a year. Just never thought to tilt it over and look at the bottom.

Anyhow you might consider a standard 500 gig SSD loaded with the OS in a Bay off the motherboard. It is true you lose the advantage of PCIe but at least you'll still be in the game.

What is really difficult to assess in these situations is the components. We want to assume that everything is OK and some one factor is contributing to the problem, but as is clear, you could be having a CPU issue, an M.2 issue, or a PSU issue. You might consider going to Newegg.com with a list of the components in your build and reading the ratings very carefully, particularly ratings for any component that is getting less than 90% approval rate (add 4 and 5 star ratings together). In these situations it pays to read some of the very detailed posts put up by people who, at least in some cases, know what they're talking about. Sometimes yo can get a helpful hint.

Many of those people are here too so you're in the right place. But I'm thinking you should try to identify the weak component.

The other thing that you might consider doing--and I know this may seem excessive--is having two computers. I have been maintaining two desktops in this household since 2013 and it is very valuable to be able to evaluate components individually on a different system. There may be fancy diagnostic tools that will give better information but there is nothing more solid, as a help in diagnosis: My computer works upstairs, when I put this part in, it doesn't work, when I put the part that is upstairs in to the computer downstairs, the downstairs computer works. For some issues, however, particularly the mobo and cpu, this may not be helpful.

Greg N
I really don’t think it’s caused by overheating I have 5 140 f
I've got my OS running on an M.2 NVMe and I must say I am a little skeptical about it. Your system description says "cooling" but it doesn't really say how the cooling is going on. If you have CPU cooling that is of course a great thing to have but it seems to me these M.2s are vulnerable to over-heating. This being the situation--perhaps I am overstepping in this view--I would think that you might want to review how well ventilated your case is.

Because BSOD and sudden shut downs while operating feels like thermal issues to me. It doesn't have to be in the CPU. I was getting spontaneous shut downs on my old build because the power supply was overheating. I discovered upon inspection that even though I had kept the case meticulously clean, I had forgotten the fan intake on the bottom of the case! The psu's intake was really clogged with dust. So it was overheating and shutting down. That was a very noob error on my part. I blew that case out twice a year. Just never thought to tilt it over and look at the bottom.

Anyhow you might consider a standard 500 gig SSD loaded with the OS in a Bay off the motherboard. It is true you lose the advantage of PCIe but at least you'll still be in the game.

What is really difficult to assess in these situations is the components. We want to assume that everything is OK and some one factor is contributing to the problem, but as is clear, you could be having a CPU issue, an M.2 issue, or a PSU issue. You might consider going to Newegg.com with a list of the components in your build and reading the ratings very carefully, particularly ratings for any component that is getting less than 90% approval rate (add 4 and 5 star ratings together). In these situations it pays to read some of the very detailed posts put up by people who, at least in some cases, know what they're talking about. Sometimes yo can get a helpful hint.

Many of those people are here too so you're in the right place. But I'm thinking you should try to identify the weak component.

The other thing that you might consider doing--and I know this may seem excessive--is having two computers. I have been maintaining two desktops in this household since 2013 and it is very valuable to be able to evaluate components individually on a different system. There may be fancy diagnostic tools that will give better information but there is nothing more solid, as a help in diagnosis: My computer works upstairs, when I put this part in, it doesn't work, when I put the part that is upstairs in to the computer downstairs, the downstairs computer works. For some issues, however, particularly the mobo and cpu, this may not be helpful.

Greg N
i am really not sure about the overheating thing? when i look at the temperatures inside my case i never see anything over 60 degrees so i not sure thats the case ?
 
Jul 5, 2019
16
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10
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No, this is basically stipulating the actual address the CPU requested the memory controller to access.

Memtest cannot detect what component exactly caused the error. And ultimately, CPU failure is rare, memory failure is common, memtest is geared to find memory errors.

Anyone who ever encounters an error on memtest, it is memory modules 99.99% of the time.
Even overclocks can cause errors.
okay do you think i should tryout some new ram? i could protentially try those from my little brothers pc almost the same
 

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