[SOLVED] Help in Diagnosing Start Up Issues

1pitch1spot

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My son built my computer in 2013 six years ago this month. I run Windows 7 Professional. Key components include:
  • ASROCK Z77 PRO4 1155 ATX motherboard
  • Intel Core I5-3570K CPU
  • Samsung E 128GB SSD 840 PRO-2.5S
  • Toshiba TOS 3.5" 1TB 7200 HDD
Funding it and letting him build it was negotiated in lieu of letting him go to Panama City for spring break. So there's a parenting tip for you LOL.

Anyway, the system runs really well once it gets up and going in the morning. But that is the problem. It crashes and reboots 3 to 4 times each morning before it finally stabilizes and then will run for the rest of the day. Sometimes Firefox will crash as well. I did check all the firmware versions with the ASROCK website and everything looks up to date.

I am a retired IT professional but not a system builder so I am looking for some general advice on how to proceed with diagnosing these issues so that I can put them to bed once and for all. Also, I am not a gamer or into overclocking or anything like that. Can someone point me in the right direction and help set me off on my journey?

I should mention (because I think my issues might be graphics related) that I do run dual Acer monitors one connected with DVI and the other HDMI. Also this update fails to install:

Intel Corporation Graphics Adapter WDDM1.0, Graphics Adapter WDDM1.1, Graphics Adapter WDDM1.2, Graphics Adapter WDDM1.3 software update released in August, 2015​
Last but not least, I know I need to move to Windows 10. I am thinking I should fix these issues first before upgrading. And being a bit of a purest, should I do a fresh install of Windows 10 ... or will I be OK overlaying it. I have resisted Windows 10 up until now but my son is telling me I am crazy not to upgrade.

Thank you in advance for all of your help.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
First suggestion is to open the case and ensure that all connections, card seatings, jumpers, etc. are all fully and firmly in place. May look and initially feel seated but just a little gentle pressure may fully seat a connection.

Second, look in Event Viewer for error codes and warnings just before the crashes and reboots. Very likely to find some clue therein that will identify the culprit.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
A full, fresh Windows 10 install is likely the best way to go. Since it's something you really should do anyway, you can also eliminate any software source for these issues before moving onto hardware causes.

There really is no reason to move at this point, with Windows 7 well into end-of-life. I prefer Windows 7's start menu better, but there are apps that are free or just a few bucks (I use Start10), which give you the older style menus but let you still access Windows 10 menus when you need to.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
First suggestion is to open the case and ensure that all connections, card seatings, jumpers, etc. are all fully and firmly in place. May look and initially feel seated but just a little gentle pressure may fully seat a connection.

Second, look in Event Viewer for error codes and warnings just before the crashes and reboots. Very likely to find some clue therein that will identify the culprit.
 

1pitch1spot

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Feb 28, 2015
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First suggestion is to open the case and ensure that all connections, card seatings, jumpers, etc. are all fully and firmly in place. May look and initially feel seated but just a little gentle pressure may fully seat a connection.

Second, look in Event Viewer for error codes and warnings just before the crashes and reboots. Very likely to find some clue therein that will identify the culprit.
Thank you. This is the kind of information/education I am looking for. Never looked at Event Viewer before. Just checked but don't see very much in there. I will open the case and make sure everything is seated. Great suggestion for starters. Will report back later. Thank you.
 

1pitch1spot

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A full, fresh Windows 10 install is likely the best way to go. Since it's something you really should do anyway, you can also eliminate any software source for these issues before moving onto hardware causes.

There really is no reason to move at this point, with Windows 7 well into end-of-life. I prefer Windows 7's start menu better, but there are apps that are free or just a few bucks (I use Start10), which give you the older style menus but let you still access Windows 10 menus when you need to.
Thank you. I was thinking too that maybe getting the Windows 10 upgrade behind me is a place to start. Do you recommend a fresh install or going through the update process?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Thank you. I was thinking too that maybe getting the Windows 10 upgrade behind me is a place to start. Do you recommend a fresh install or going through the update process?
I'd try to do the upgrade just to get moved over to Windows 10 and then do a fresh, full install after. Some people have reported still getting granted a free upgrade. Just make sure it's associated with a Microsoft account.
 

1pitch1spot

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UPDATE: Just rebooted (did not have chance to open case). Crashed during power up. All I see in Event Viewer under Critical is an error called Kernal-Power with Event ID of 41. I do have a crap ton of these now that I notice. Also this from "Windows has recovered from an unexpected shutdown" ...

Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.256.48
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: 1a
BCP1: 0000000000003452
BCP2: 0000000014FA1000
BCP3: FFFFF700010CC798
BCP4: 0000000000000000
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 256_1
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Those errors may be from you having to shut off to recover.

Look in Reliability History/Monitor. For more information:

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/windows-7-reliability-monitor/

Would be remiss if I did not ask about the PSU. Make, model, wattage, age, condition? If six years old it may no longer be up to handling the current power requirements.

Some component inside may be working/cracking loose and only maintains connectivity after the internals have all really warmed up and expanded.
 

1pitch1spot

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Those errors may be from you having to shut off to recover.

Look in Reliability History/Monitor. For more information:

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/windows-7-reliability-monitor/

Would be remiss if I did not ask about the PSU. Make, model, wattage, age, condition? If six years old it may no longer be up to handling the current power requirements.

Some component inside may be working/cracking loose and only maintains connectivity after the internals have all really warmed up and expanded.
Timely question since I have cabinet open. PSU is Thermaltake TR2 600W ATX 12V 2.3 P/N TR-600.

So just now it booted to the login screen with the generic flower icon, not mine. I could enter my password but nothing else would work. ENTER did not work or clicking on the arrow ... it just stayed there ... and then rebooted after about a minute.

Will look into Reliability/History Monitor next.

I'm embarrassed to ask this but where is the SSD? Is that on the motherboard? I've never tinkered with a box that has an SSD.
 

1pitch1spot

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Well I am certainly learning some things, i.e. Reliability Monitor. The Reliability Monitor is showing much of what I am seeing. I don't think I can insert a screen grab here, right?
 

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