Question Help my new ASUS ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING buil won't start.

Jul 10, 2019
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My build is with following new parts:

Fractal Design Core 2500 - Case - Miditower
ASUS ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING Motherboard
AMD Ryzen 5 2600 with Wraith Stealth Stock cooler.
Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-2666 C16 BK DC - 16GB
ASUS GeForce RTX 2060 Phoenix - 6GB GDDR6 RAM
Samsung 970 EVO Plus SSD M.2 2280 - 1TB
Seagate BarraCuda 3.5" ST2000DM008 HDD - 2 TB
TP-Link Archer T6E - AC1300 WIFI-card
2x Arctic P12 PWM PST - case fan
Cooler Master Elite V3 600W

The following happens:

1) Power on the powersupply.
  • Light on the USB 2.0 keyboard gives a short blink.
  • Rgb light on the i/o-shield on the motherboard lights up.
  • White light on the GeForce card by the power connection lights up.
2) Power up the PC with the front panel powerbutton
  • Can hear sound from the HDD for a short while.
  • All fans start up (CPU, GPU, 2xCase-fan powered by motherboard, 2xCase-fan powered by powersupply)
  • No light from Onboard Q-led that should display error found.
  • Don't have case speaker so I can't hear Bios beep.
  • No light on keyboard (NumKey lights up when used on my old computer).
  • Tried 2 different monitors (Hdmi/displayport connected to graphicscard not i/o on motherboard). No signal from pc.
  • PC don't power down when I press the power button for more than 4 seconds.
Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
 
Jul 10, 2019
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PSU would be a joke. The supplier contacted me and said there was 1 item they could not deliver.
That was the PSU, they suggested this CM Elite as a replacement. It was a bit more expensive than my order, but they would give it to me for the same price.
I accepteted to get the total order delivered.

Even so, I have hardly anything connected to the PC yet, 600W is way over what is needed, can the PSU really be that bad?

From the replies (stickypost, and answer) I will start with the memorysticks and CMOS.
Since the board don't show Q-led warning I am fearing the CPU.

Most likely I can have made an error with the case connctors (all black cables with only a tiny arrow) But from what I read this should have made other symptoms.

Thanks for the help so far.
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
Even so, I have hardly anything connected to the PC yet, 600W is way over what is needed, can the PSU really be that bad?
Yes it can. Unfortunately the PSU industry is flooded with units of poor quality, because it fits a budget.
It concerns me that your one before it was even cheaper!

Cheap PSUs = Cheap Components = Risk to your rig.
It really has very little to do with the overall wattage, especially considering it's not just the overall wattage that powers your main components, and anything can cause a PSU to become damaged, not just how much power is being used, but the stability for example.

The PSU is the one thing to not go cheap on.


You can tell a lot about the quality of a PSU by it's warranty.

Anything 3 years and less is concerning and I would probably never touch myself.
Anything 5 years and less is decent enough, but sometimes questionable.
Then you'll have some of the best that can be around 7 to 10+ years.

For example most Seasonics come with 10 or 12 years warranty. Because they arguably are the best. And their units are fantastic quality. For example:
  • Corsair VS (poor quality) = 3 years
  • EVGA B1 series (E.g. 450B - poor quality) = 3 years
  • Corsair RM (decent quality) = 5 years
  • Seasonic Focus Plus (great quality) = 10 years
  • Corsair AXi (great quality) = 10 years.
  • The elite series offer 1 to 3 years! Awful.
here is a post I did a while ago about someone who wanted a cheap PSU but didn't quite believe the "poor quality" elements!
If you don't have the money now, save up.

Honestly, as much as it might be a pain, we don't recommend more expensive PSUs because we want you to spend more money or for "FPS".
You really do need to spend more. Cheap PSUs use lower grade OEM manufacturers and use cheap components which risk the safety of your other components. And the last thing you should skrimp on, is the component that literally provides direct power to your entire system.

View: https://youtu.be/vY27LkiEROg


If a PSU blows and takes out other components (which Cheap PSUs often do) - any warranty you have will not cover the rest of your components.
Honestly you can spend 30 euros now, and potentially run the risk of this happening, or save for a bit, and pay for a PSU knowing it comes with a better warranty and protects the rest of your PC should worst case happens. We have a common saying:

Despite whatever money you save on a cheap PSU now, it will cost you more when it fails later
You can get a cheap PSU if you want, but you do so at your own risk. We say so because the last thing we would want is for you to pay this money anyway, for it to damage other components, getting a good quality PSU means you can rest knowing the PSU should work for the next few years without issue. And it really does pay to save and get a good quality unit.

So in reality, it is up to you my friend, but if you really care about your components, save and get a good quality unit and you won't regret it!

 
Jul 10, 2019
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I don't disagree with what you say about PSU's.
I just pointed out the irony of going from a sould out sale of what probably was a better PSU,
and ending up with a supposedly better PCU, which I later discovered was higher priced there than with the competitors.

So what you are saying is that the PSU deliver so little that it just gets the fans to spin, and the HDD to start spinning, but not to get the GPU to start up?

I tried with a single Memory module, and tested it in all 4 sockets.
I tried the Cmos reset
I reconnected all the front panel connectors.

I dont see how i can check the processor, I watched youtube videos of alignment of the CPU, and doublechecked the arrows, and the CPU more or less "slid" into place,
so I did not damage any pins.

I found an old MSI NX8600GT GPU, If I find a DVI cable I will try that to take away "all" power consumption from the PSU.
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
I don't disagree with what you say about PSU's.
I just pointed out the irony of going from a sould out sale of what probably was a better PSU,
and ending up with a supposedly better PCU, which I later discovered was higher priced there than with the competitors.

So what you are saying is that the PSU deliver so little that it just gets the fans to spin, and the HDD to start spinning, but not to get the GPU to start up?

I tried with a single Memory module, and tested it in all 4 sockets.
I tried the Cmos reset
I reconnected all the front panel connectors.

I dont see how i can check the processor, I watched youtube videos of alignment of the CPU, and doublechecked the arrows, and the CPU more or less "slid" into place,
so I did not damage any pins.

I found an old MSI NX8600GT GPU, If I find a DVI cable I will try that to take away "all" power consumption from the PSU.
Oh yeah I wasn't suggesting you disagreed, just thought i'd post it for your consideration.

Well it's not just about how much power it delivers, but also how that power is regulated or stabilised. Because your PSU obviously has different rails which powers differents parts of the PC. If any of the rails act oddly, it can cause issues, but main issue tends to be from your 12V rail as it supplies power to the most critical parts.

So for example, the PSU may start normally, then when the GPU comes under load and draws more power, a poor quality PSU can do many things, one if which is not supply the correct power, or even if might supply it, then it might have some "ripple" - and simply even fluctuate to say, 11.1V, which can be enough to shut down the whole PC or cause the GPU to crash.

Just an example.

Try another GPU and see if the issue persists, the other GPU might not have the same power requirements, so it's not a like for like test, but it can certainly help indicate what the problem might be.
 

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