Question Help needed: Accidentally used hand sanitizer w/moisturizer wipes used on PC parts...

May 17, 2022
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I am in the middle of transferring parts as well as upgrading what was an HP Omen 25L. To clarify, this was all done with the PC disassembled and in the individual components and still is.*

The ingredients are 70% ethyl alcohol, and then the sketchy stuff: Aqua, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Glycerin, Propylene Glycol, Tocopheryl Acetate

Was using the wipes on the mobo, RAM, SSD's and GPU as I had concerns about debris and dust and the liquid did go into some ports as I cleaned.

Any ideas on how I can clean up any possible residue, would the lovely aloe etc pose a hazard to the components? I went ahead and used actual, medical grade 70% IPA after the bemusement and horror of realizing what I had done to clean most of the components and left to air dry.

Thank-you all in-advance for any and all information and advice you can offer!


- If needed, here is my rationale for why I used alcohol to clean my PC...

- PC sits in a fairly dusty area and despite vacuuming nearby there was hair stubble my shaver after plugging it in to charge nearby.

- HP's QC seems a bit lacking. Several screws were over-tightened with stripped paint and screws for the optional AIO mount did not fit. Thus they created a fair bit of metallic shavings/debris that landed on my SSD's and 2070 Super card.

- Figured that IPA would be the best bet as it evaporates quickly and a damp cloth along with canned air duster would help remove any bits of dust, stubble and paint, metal debris.
 
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Remove CMOS battery and disconnect from power. You can then flush with 90% isopropyl alcohol or a non-residue electrical contact cleaner. Then set it in front of a fan for a week. It'll probably dry a lot faster but that's what I always do when I wet any board with alcohol.

Actually, when degunking really old PCB. I soak with alcohol. Scrub with a toothbrush. Then flush rinse with water. Sometimes a couple times. Before and after a recap. Although I speed up drying by hitting them with my reflow station at 100C.

You just need to disconnect all power sources. Including the battery. It isn't water that kills electronics. It's the short circuit.
 
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May 17, 2022
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Hey, thanks for the reply... Sorry for responding late I wanted to see if there would be more replies.

I'll definitely give it a good cleaning - got some 99% IPA and plenty of cotton swabs and paper towels.


Remove CMOS battery and disconnect from power. You can then flush with 90% isopropyl alcohol or a non-residue electrical contact cleaner. Then set it in front of a fan for a week. It'll probably dry a lot faster but that's what I always do when I wet any board with alcohol.

Actually, when degunking really old PCB. I soak with alcohol. Scrub with a toothbrush. Then flush rinse with water. Sometimes a couple times. Before and after a recap. Although I speed up drying by hitting them with my reflow station at 100C.

You just need to disconnect all power sources. Including the battery. It isn't water that kills electronics. It's the short circuit.
 

punkncat

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Most modern brake cleaners are now made mostly of Acetone and is fine to clean all those parts with. I looked up CRC specifically and it's Acetone, CO2 as propellant and a small bit of Toulene.

For reference check TechYesCity on YouTube for the "Tech Yes lovin". He even uses a hypersonic bath on parts. Soap and water under the spout, etc. In the case that you use something conductive you have to blow it out really well and dry well. Often seen him use a spray very akin to WD40 for help with that aspect.
 
The issue with liquids and electronics is that corrosion is almost immediate, flushing with iso is good because it displaces the liquid and dries quickly without leaving residue, although 70% is probably too low.
Leaving a board to dry is useless because you are just letting the corrosion happen, you have to clean up the board immediately and if you do you can also power it up immediately.

This one is about phones but the same principles apply.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UU5T0GOmfvE
 
Most modern brake cleaners are now made mostly of Acetone and is fine to clean all those parts with. I looked up CRC specifically and it's Acetone, CO2 as propellant and a small bit of Toulene.

For reference check TechYesCity on YouTube for the "Tech Yes lovin". He even uses a hypersonic bath on parts. Soap and water under the spout, etc. In the case that you use something conductive you have to blow it out really well and dry well. Often seen him use a spray very akin to WD40 for help with that aspect.
Acetone can dissolve plastic and insulating paint on MBs and other parts. It's OK for metal though.
 
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