Help Needed - Updating AMD Ryzen 5 Chipset Drivers

a_seymour

Reputable
Dec 2, 2014
29
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4,530
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Hi All,

Decided to give my MOBO and chipset an update today.

Downloaded and installed the latest chipset drivers listed on my motherboard manufacturer's website (MSI B350 PC Mate).

I noticed however these were not the latest drivers, so I had a look at AMD's website and downloaded the latest, and proceeded to install them.

However upon install there has been zero confirmation pop up as seems usual, nor any sign that it has completed successfully.

When I now attempt to run the updater, it either doesn't launch or I receive an error stating another instance is running.

I'm wanting to know what chipset is actually installed, or whether there's anything I can do to clean up whatever I have installed.

Apologies if I seem a little uneducated, been quite a while since I've used this forum.

Cheers :)
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
The chipset on your board is a B350 chipset. Are you sure you tinkered with only the chipset drivers? You could try and see if you have any BIOS updates pending for your board after checking which version you're currently on. If you do try to install the latest chipset drivers off of AMD's support site, you will be able to proceed unless you're on the current version at which point it'll ask you if you want to move forward.
 


Check those important drivers thusly:

Open Device Manager... in Cortana search type 'Device Manager'... then System Devices. Right click on each entry 'AMD GPIO...., AMD PCI, AMD SMBus' and then 'Update Driver', then 'Search Automatically.....'. It will check against the latest registered driver and tell you if you're good to go.

do the same for 'Universial Serial Bus controllers', 'AMD USB 3.0....' and 'AMD USB 3.1...'.

do the same for 'IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers', 'Standard SATA AHCI...'

Ryzen processors and Promontory chipsets have been out long enough that by this point Microsoft is serving up stable and reliable system drivers that are more than likely going to be WHQL and should play nicely with advanced security features.

Video drivers, LAN/WiFi, audio etc. are different. While you CAN use that same process to keep the Windows default drivers up to date, to get the full control with additional utilities and applications they frequently come with you need to install mfr's driver package.

Clean up after Windows' installs is pretty easy: type 'Disk Cleanup' in Cortana, select the system drive (C: usually) and follow the instructions. Aside from the obvious (the downloaded file you initiated the install from) other installs can be problematic. Most drivers now place a complete set of install files at a storage point (for AMD drivers, in the AMD folder at the root of C: drive on my system) where they can be re-installed from. You can clean that up, but then you've kind of negated whatever value they offered. Still: for AMD video cards there's a 'driver update of the month' and those old install files linger there forever.

Many others (especially those from the motherboard mfr) will install a bunch of bloatware even if you're careful to watch for 'install Chrome' traps. Best way way to get rid of that is go through the Apps folder (type 'Apps' in Cortana), identify those crazy things you don't explicitly recall installing, right click and select UNINSTALL.


 

a_seymour

Reputable
Dec 2, 2014
29
0
4,530
0
Check those important drivers thusly:

Open Device Manager... in Cortana search type 'Device Manager'... then System Devices. Right click on each entry 'AMD GPIO...., AMD PCI, AMD SMBus' and then 'Update Driver', then 'Search Automatically.....'. It will check against the latest registered driver and tell you if you're good to go.

do the same for 'Universial Serial Bus controllers', 'AMD USB 3.0....' and 'AMD USB 3.1...'.

do the same for 'IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers', 'Standard SATA AHCI...'

Ryzen processors and Promontory chipsets have been out long enough that by this point Microsoft is serving up stable and reliable system drivers that are more than likely going to be WHQL and should play nicely with advanced security features.

Video drivers, LAN/WiFi, audio etc. are different. While you CAN use that same process to keep the Windows default drivers up to date, to get the full control with additional utilities and applications they frequently come with you need to install mfr's driver package.

Clean up after Windows' installs is pretty easy: type 'Disk Cleanup' in Cortana, select the system drive (C: usually) and follow the instructions. Aside from the obvious (the downloaded file you initiated the install from) other installs can be problematic. Most drivers now place a complete set of install files at a storage point (for AMD drivers, in the AMD folder at the root of C: drive on my system) where they can be re-installed from. You can clean that up, but then you've kind of negated whatever value they offered. Still: for AMD video cards there's a 'driver update of the month' and those old install files linger there forever.

Many others (especially those from the motherboard mfr) will install a bunch of bloatware even if you're careful to watch for 'install Chrome' traps. Best way way to get rid of that is go through the Apps folder (type 'Apps' in Cortana), identify those crazy things you don't explicitly recall installing, right click and select UNINSTALL.
Thanks for the helpful information, run through all of that as described! :)

Did notice AMD's folder sitting on my C drive. In theory would I be able to delete that folder and then re-run the installer I was using without issue?

I was originally concerned that the folder would have anything important in there not to be touched without a proper uninstall process.

Cheers again :)
 


I've done that before without issues. I would only suggest it for driver packages you know are old and have been updated already just to be safe. If you look into the folder you'll find expanded install files for AMD video cards (if you have one) and for chipset drivers (if you've done discrete installs of them) as well as some other packages. The reason I would avoid deleting the currently installed driver folder is that is a store used to repair the driver installation.

I also wouldn't suggest updating chipset drivers unless you know there is something to be gained from it. Especially if you've done the 'update driver' thing in Device Manager above.

Unless, of course, you like the challenge of chasing down problems that my pop up if things go pear shaped :)

BTW...BEFORE you start playing with ANY of this stuff create a restore point in System Restore. It works wonders to go back to an earlier time, before a driver install got fudged up.

 

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