Question help swapping Nvidia GeForce 8600 GT for Radeon 2600 Pro

Sep 5, 2022
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My Nvidia GeForce 8600 GT card is showing VRAM artifacts so im going to swap it with a Radeon 2600 Pro from my old computer.
I read before this can be tricky and you dont want Nvidia drivers present when you install Radeon or vice-versa.
My computer is a HP Pavilion m9250f

i watched this video and it seems very easy.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Wu6NaaSBFk


When i remove my Nvidia current driver from Add Remove Programs then reboot, Windows automatically reinstalls the default driver that came with the computer for the Nvidia 8600. I have a Windows recovery on my system that doesnt need a disc, its on the computer. . Running DDU will remove that default Nvidia driver but if i want to uninstall the new Radeon driver in the future, after running DDU again and rebooting, will Windows reinstall the default Nvidia driver again?

Also, my current BIOS has PCI as the default video adapter but my card is Nvidia GeForce 8600 GT and that is PCI Express 16.
Why is the BIOS Set on PCI? and if i change it to PCI Express 16 will the computer boot up correctly?
Im going to change it to PCI Express 16 when i install the Radeon 2600 Pro im just baffeled how and why its set on PCI.
Since its set on PCI now, will i get better performance out of my existing Nvidia 8600 by switching it to PCI Express 16?
Im thinking that might be the reason my existing Nvidia card isnt perfoming correctly.
 
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The whole thing about "Windows freaks out over two video card drivers" puzzles me, especially considering that Windows since at least 95 can handle two video cards just fine. If you wanted to use a Voodoo 3D card, you needed a 2D card too, so that's two video cards that Windows needs to juggle. If you wanted multiple monitors back then, you likely needed two video cards, and typically you'd get a cheap one just for the outputs. And even more recently, we have laptops that run a combination of Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA GPUs just fine. And the last time I had an Intel PC I used the iGPU's output for additional monitors.

Anyway, this all to say you don't need to do anything. Sure it's a good idea anyway to uninstall the previous graphics card's drivers, but it doesn't matter if you swap video cards with them still installed. Drivers have ID numbers that's supposed to match up with ID numbers that the hardware reports. If they don't match, then either Windows will use a generic driver (which it has for video output) or not allow usage of the hardware until a driver is supplied.

Regarding the BIOS thing, you already had a topic on this: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/whats-wrong-with-my-graphics-and-is-bios-set-wrong-for-my-graphics-card.3778933. But I don't think it matters because the computer is smart enough to figure out that if there isn't a card in the PCI slot, go try something else. That option likely exists on the off chance you have multiple video cards installed and you want to mark one for the computer to use as the primary one so BIOS can output video to something. It does nothing to performance or anything.
 
Sep 5, 2022
87
1
45
2
The whole thing about "Windows freaks out over two video card drivers" puzzles me, especially considering that Windows since at least 95 can handle two video cards just fine. If you wanted to use a Voodoo 3D card, you needed a 2D card too, so that's two video cards that Windows needs to juggle. If you wanted multiple monitors back then, you likely needed two video cards, and typically you'd get a cheap one just for the outputs. And even more recently, we have laptops that run a combination of Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA GPUs just fine. And the last time I had an Intel PC I used the iGPU's output for additional monitors.

Anyway, this all to say you don't need to do anything. Sure it's a good idea anyway to uninstall the previous graphics card's drivers, but it doesn't matter if you swap video cards with them still installed. Drivers have ID numbers that's supposed to match up with ID numbers that the hardware reports. If they don't match, then either Windows will use a generic driver (which it has for video output) or not allow usage of the hardware until a driver is supplied.

Regarding the BIOS thing, you already had a topic on this: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/whats-wrong-with-my-graphics-and-is-bios-set-wrong-for-my-graphics-card.3778933. But I don't think it matters because the computer is smart enough to figure out that if there isn't a card in the PCI slot, go try something else. That option likely exists on the off chance you have multiple video cards installed and you want to mark one for the computer to use as the primary one so BIOS can output video to something. It does nothing to performance or anything.
thank you.
I forgot about the other topic. i been having alot of problems and questions lately im losing track and sleep.
 

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